timtye78

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Ultimately it does not matter, but I thought I would see what current DO students/residents/attendings think about this.

I think the most comfortable route is the "Dr", but I think in the long run it would be better if the public sees more "DO" initials for better recognition.

Your thoughts?
 

docbill

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Well I don't see the difference.
It depends on what you normally do at your hospital.

I don't think patients care or notice. As long as you have the authority to help them.
 

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timtye78 said:
...I think in the long run it would be better if the public sees more "DO" initials for better recognition.

Your thoughts?
I don't think that the public ever sees Dr. they just see the whit coat.
 

jonb12997

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only because I was looking, but I saw a doctor on one of those TLC shows that had first last DO on his white coat. But I agree, I think most people just see the white coat
 

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timtye78 said:
Ultimately it does not matter, but I thought I would see what current DO students/residents/attendings think about this.

I think the most comfortable route is the "Dr", but I think in the long run it would be better if the public sees more "DO" initials for better recognition.

Your thoughts?
I'm putting D.O. on mine.

I wouldn't want people thinking I was a pharmacist, podiatrist or chiropractor.

(Not that there's anything wrong with that.)
 

JohnDO

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I thought I heard somewhere that some hospitals like it a certain way. I know the osteopathic physician I shadowed had First Last, D.O., which is probably what I will have unless hospital policy dictates otherwise.

Oddly, his hospital I.D. hung over the writing on his white coat, but it said the same thing.
 

InductionAgent

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Although not everyone is familiar with the DO degree, it is distinctly the degree of a physician. "Dr." can refer to many non-physicians - Ph.D. psychologists, basic scientists, Pharm.D.'s, etc, all of whom can wear a long white coat if they so desire.

Therefore, I plan to go with "my name, DO."
 

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i'm planning to put first/last/DO. if a patient asks me about it, it becomes an educational opportunity (as tim said - eventually better public recognition). patients will more likely judge you by your ability to communicate with them. they generally don't know a great deal about medical education and there is a huge information asymmetry between you and the patients (by this i mean that it's probably not easy for patients to tell how competent you are... unless you really screw up) but all this is a different topic (i ramble once again)
 

OSUdoc08

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TCOM-2006 said:
i'm planning to put first/last/DO. if a patient asks me about it, it becomes an educational opportunity (as tim said - eventually better public recognition). patients will more likely judge you by your ability to communicate with them. they generally don't know a great deal about medical education and there is a huge information asymmetry between you and the patients (by this i mean that it's probably not easy for patients to tell how competent you are... unless you really screw up) but all this is a different topic (i ramble once again)
Patients never ask.

When my white coat has medical student written up down and sideways, they always call me "Doctor."

Noone actually reads your white coat.
 

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OSUdoc08 said:
Patients never ask.

When my white coat has medical student written up down and sideways, they always call me "Doctor."

Noone actually reads your white coat.


Amazingly, if you're wearing the exact same coat but you're female approximately 1/3 of those patients will call you "nurse." :rolleyes:
 

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timtye78 said:
Ultimately it does not matter, but I thought I would see what current DO students/residents/attendings think about this.

I think the most comfortable route is the "Dr", but I think in the long run it would be better if the public sees more "DO" initials for better recognition.

Your thoughts?
I'm going to school to become a medical doctor with unlimited practice priviledges. I will enter a speciality where I will use no OMM in my practice. Like my Physics courses, my OMM classes during medical school will just be another "hoop" to jump through to get where I want to go.

I really have no interest in playing PR games that would force our reputations back down a road that takes them closer to their chiropractor-like roots.
 

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Buckeye(OH) said:
Physics courses are hardly a 'hoop'.
You are correct. Physics is more like an organ-grinder that the powers that be force us medical monkeys to play!
 

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You know what is kinda funny about it is that the AOA continually pushes us to say OMS and for residents and physicians to have -name, DO- on their coat. If you got the last issue of The DO magazine, there is a picture of our great AOA Pres., Dr. Thomas, in his office. His white coat reads Dr. Thomas, not -name, DO- Someone should write an editiorial about it to the JAOA.

Interesting huh.

NF
 
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timtye78

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Old_Mil said:
I'm going to school to become a medical doctor with unlimited practice priviledges. I will enter a speciality where I will use no OMM in my practice. Like my Physics courses, my OMM classes during medical school will just be another "hoop" to jump through to get where I want to go.

I really have no interest in playing PR games that would force our reputations back down a road that takes them closer to their chiropractor-like roots.

I am not interested in playing PR games either. I do not agree that putting DO is a negative smudge on our reps. I think even if patients don't read your white coat, attendings do. I have actually known of some MD interns snicker about DO's leaving DO off intentionally.
Leaving it off begs the question, honestly, "Are you embarrassed to be a DO?"

I am not anymore! I acheived what I consider the same residency I would have wanted even if I was an MD. I am going into a field in high demand and one that pays well. In fact, my income will be higher than many practicing MDs out there. I think RNs, PA-C, MDs alike all need to see good examples of DOs who are 1)good docs 2)not afraid to let it be known that they are DOs.

I think I would rather everyone know who and what I am and I will eventually make or break my career by my knowledge and skills. I would hope that by wearing the title, I would actually increase the awareness of our presence and our successes of acheiving acceptance into the so-called 'MD' world.
 

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I put D.O. on my coat, name tag, and all professional identifying information including lectures and academic talks. I happily explain what a DO is to anyone who asks. This rarely happens.
 

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Dr. Thomas of the AOA has "Dr. Thomas" on his white coat (see pics of him in our journals). I wonder why he doesn't have DO on his coat.

-J
 

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Proudly place "D.O." after your name on your white coat and name tag/ID card. You earned this degree through your hard work. It is your professional identity. Your professional conduct and quality of medical practice will speak for itself to your patients and other observers.

Often your practice specialty or hospital department will be placed under your name further identifying your professional activities, or it may just say "staff physician" or "house officer" depending on your current status.

The vast majority of people won't ask about your degree. If asked, I give a very short explanation of the D.O. degree and move on.

In almost all health care facilities where you practice, you will have been required to be credentialed to practice your specialty at that facility and will have been granted the "privileges" to practice at that facility. If the D.O. degree were a problem, you wouldn't be seeing patients at that facility.

I introduce myself to patients and their families as "Dr. Saxman" from the internal medicine service. The white coat and name tag identification speaks for itself.
 

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timtye78 said:
Ultimately it does not matter, but I thought I would see what current DO students/residents/attendings think about this.

I think the most comfortable route is the "Dr", but I think in the long run it would be better if the public sees more "DO" initials for better recognition.

Your thoughts?
Putting DO after your name is the only way to go, IMO. If you went to an osteopathic school, then you are a DO physician. Those are the letters of your credentials.

I can't see how anybody would be ashamed of something that is so friggin' hard to earn. It is one thing to question OMT or disagree with the politics of the AOA, but somebody that would try to hide that they were a DO should not have gone to an osteopathic school.
 

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I'm an allopathic student. There are a handful of DO's in the internal medicine residency where I am. Their coats say DO just like eveybody elses that say MD. You earned that DO, be proud of it! :thumbup:
 

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I put Dr...I don't even put my first name on my jacket...why? Because I am an EM resident and I don't particularly want my patients to know too much about me!
Doesn't really matter because my name tag has DO on it.

Really, this discussion is about preferences and insecurities. I prefer just prefer "DR".
 

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"...till I got dat "DO" tatted on my chest!"

...a little 2PAC reference. Actually, its "thug life" for those not a fan of hip hop. But I think it makes a good point. Since we, as DOs, are the thugs of medicine, straight out of ghetto medical school, we need to be proud of that shiznit. :laugh:

Actually, on a serious note... I dont think the question is so much about being proud or not being proud, its more about whether you feel like fielding questions about it. I am not so sure I really want the added headache throughout the day. Especially when the further I go along through school, I see how similiar DOs and MDs really are.

Seriously, how do you explain the difference in one big swooping statement, without completely making generalizations about every doctor one category or the other. Its difficult... unless you just say, we do OMT.
 

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I'd like a white coat that says Name, D.O. on the front, and then I'll have "DO's Kick @ss" stenciled into the back of it...Yeah, osteopathic pride! :smuggrin: :thumbup:

Old_Mil said:
...my OMM classes during medical school will just be another "hoop" to jump through to get where I want to go.
Welcome to the profession! It's always nice to see such passion and commitment. Sorry to hear about your low MCAT score. Just think, a few more points and you could have actually gotten in to an allopathic school. Golly, better luck getting an MD residency :luck: .

NS
 

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DrMom said:
Amazingly, if you're wearing the exact same coat but you're female approximately 1/3 of those patients will call you "nurse." :rolleyes:
Or my favorite, "secretary".
 

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Old_Mil said:
I'm going to school to become a medical doctor with unlimited practice priviledges. I will enter a speciality where I will use no OMM in my practice. Like my Physics courses, my OMM classes during medical school will just be another "hoop" to jump through to get where I want to go.

I really have no interest in playing PR games that would force our reputations back down a road that takes them closer to their chiropractor-like roots.
You sound bitter. Is Grandma giving you some grief over why you aren't going to be a "real doctor"?
 

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This thread is amusing as patients will be more interested in your ability to care for them than the name on your coat but here it goes anyway. Ethically, you should use the letters of your degree on your coat as that is the educational training you received to care for patients. You will learn this throughout your training. I will have DO after my name but doctor is who I am. You must be supportive of your training but also recognize who you are as a doctor. This is a fine line that everyone must walk. I have seen too many doctors in the real world that put Dr. in front of their name instead of DO after it and I think this is sad and shows low self esteem in the physician. Again let me reiterate, Patients are more interested in your ability to care for them than the 2 letters on your chest.
 

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Doc_Thks_JC said:
I have seen too many doctors in the real world that put Dr. in front of their name instead of DO after it and I think this is sad and shows low self esteem in the physician.
What is sad is that you make such ridiculous generalizations. I took the white coat that my residency handed me and it happened to say Dr. Bobo, not Bobo, DO.
 

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from DO-Online: http://do-online.osteotech.org/index.cfm?PageID=aoa_ethics

Part III - Osteopathic Identification

The following, in order of preference, are considered proper on practice stationery and office signs:

1. John Doe, DO
2. John Doe, Osteopathic Physician & Surgeon
3. John Doe, Doctor of Osteopathy

The following are not considered proper on practice stationery or office signs:

1. Dr. John Doe (this is considered improper even if the doctor signs his name "John Doe, DO"). The osteopathic identification should be printed.
2. Dr. John Doe, Specialist in Osteopathic Medicine. The term specialist should be avoided in this circumstance.
 

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bobo said:
What is sad is that you make such ridiculous generalizations. I took the white coat that my residency handed me and it happened to say Dr. Bobo, not Bobo, DO.
What if it had said, "Bobo, MD"?

Would you have it changed? Many would not.

Also, residency is a different issue than being in practice.
 

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medgrrl said:
from DO-Online: http://do-online.osteotech.org/index.cfm?PageID=aoa_ethics

Part III - Osteopathic Identification

The following, in order of preference, are considered proper on practice stationery and office signs:

1. John Doe, DO
2. John Doe, Osteopathic Physician & Surgeon
3. John Doe, Doctor of Osteopathy

The following are not considered proper on practice stationery or office signs:

1. Dr. John Doe (this is considered improper even if the doctor signs his name "John Doe, DO"). The osteopathic identification should be printed.
2. Dr. John Doe, Specialist in Osteopathic Medicine. The term specialist should be avoided in this circumstance.
Dr.DOE is fine in my opinion.
I am not in the mood to change MS1, MS2... to OMS1 and OMS2.

The AOA changed the names to Osteopathic PHYSICIAN and Osteopathic MEDICAL schools. This was done to get closer to allopath now they want to distance themself.

As many have said before.. patients don't usually care. If they do then they are not that sick and should not be seeing a physician. heheeh
 

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I would like to beg a minor point.

Yes, M.D. and D.O. recipients are doctors.

But English PhD, Pharm D, Nursing Ph.D, Optomitrists, etc are also doctors.

Only M.D. and D.O. recipients are licensed physicians that can legally practice the full scope of traditional medicine and surgery.

Yes, Chiropractors and Naturopaths are doctors and physicians, but they have limitations to their scope of practice.

My own personal bias is to be identified as a physician. The term has a special meaning to me. I realize that the more common meaning of physician is doctor, but I wouldn't let a Doctor of Biological Anthropology do an arthroplasty on my hip.

I was going to make a point about barbers and surgeons, but I wil let that thought pass without incident.

Thank you SDN moderators for a fun forum.
 

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Gotta put D.O. on your coat unless it is standard to have Dr. (as in everyone else has Dr.). Some people may not care one way or the other but I think most who just put Dr. aren't very confident. I know that if a program issued me a coat that said Dr. and everyone else had MD, I would tell tham to take it back. I mean at some point you have to have some pride, not just for the profession, but for yourself. Just my point of view and I am no Mr. Osteopathy/OMM guru but come on. In the end I think you will define yourself by the way you practice and the friends you make.