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Dr.J.D

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My principals and teachers recommending that I graduate in 3 yrs because I basically have covered the required credits to graduate. I want to go into NYITCOM for their 7 yr program I have a good sat score.


Should I do it?
 

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Please do not graduate high school in 3 years to go to a 7 year DO program.
 
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Everybody pls respond ASAP
Lol, ASAP?

I'd say go for it if this is what you truly want out of your youth. However, it sounds like you have the smarts to take on undergrad and medical school within the normal timeline.

You may regret your decision in the future if you jump the gun now. A lot changes over the course of a few years.

Good luck!
 
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DKB15

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Everybody pls respond ASAP

Trust the process man. I know you are anxious and eager to start a new career. But really trust the process. Enjoy your last year of high school with friends. High school comes around once.
 
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Dr.J.D

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Thanks to everybody for responding
 

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Lol, ASAP?

I'd say go for it if this is what you truly want out of your youth. However, it sounds like you have the smarts to take on undergrad and medical school within the normal timeline.

You may regret your decision in the future if you jump the gun now. A lot changes over the course of a few years.

Good luck!
I'll definetly take your advice
Thank you so much.
 

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The real question is whether you will be mature enough to perform and learn at your maximum capabilities. Cutting a year off for a 7-year program in my opinion is pushing it, in my opinion. What you are suggesting is 2 years off, which essentially results in you going to med school when you're 20 (I assume that it's 3 UG and then 4 Med). Whether or not you feel mature enough to be able to truly succeed is for you to answer. I'd personally endorse enjoying high school - you never get it back.
 
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Dr.J.D

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The real question is whether you will be mature enough to perform and learn at your maximum capabilities. Cutting a year off for a 7-year program in my opinion is pushing it, in my opinion. What you are suggesting is 2 years off, which essentially results in you going to med school when you're 20 (I assume that it's 3 UG and then 4 Med). Whether or not you feel mature enough to be able to truly succeed is for you to answer. I'd personally endorse enjoying high school - you never get it back.
Yea that's pretty good advice. Do you think the program would accept me if I finished high school a year earlier?
 

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It really depends on the school's preferences and your performance. I'm not familiar with the program, so I can't say. There's a thread on CC about the stats and such. I assume that if you graduate early, your class ranking (if your school does that) might be wonky.
 

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Why NYITCOM? Why not apply to BS/MD programs as a highschool Senior along with the premed powerhouse undergrads? What ballpark is "good SAT"?
 

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It seems like you're dreaming of being a doctor ASAP, but since you're still young, there are some things to consider. If you do want to graduate high school in 3 years, great. But I would recommend taking that extra year and travel or do something that you love. It might seem like a big deal now, "wasting" a year, but I guarantee it won't matter if you become a doctor at age 25 or 26. What will be memorable is if you taking that time to explore the world or go and do some shadowing or volunteering to see if this is really something you can commit to for the rest of your life. I don't know too much about the combined BS/MD or BS/DO schools, but I do know that when you apply for med school (after graduating college) they want to see that you have been exposed to the medical field. You can't just get into med school with a good gpa and MCAT score, you need a lot of extracurricular activities. They want to see that you have other life experiences, hobbies, etc.

On a side note, I took some time off after I graduated college and traveled for almost a year (backpacking through some diff countries) before I started medical school. It was the best experience of my life and I would NEVER regret. I also took some of that time and did medical internships overseas, and I always got asked about that during my interviews! Med schools want to see that while you may love medicine, you also have a life outside of it and things you like to do so you don't burn out.

Also, don't go into medical schools having regrets! "I wish I had done that before med school"
Because after you start, you won't have time! It's a lot easier to take the time off now to travel or whatever you want to do after high school or college than after med school.
Don't feel so rushed! :)
 
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Dr.J.D

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Why NYITCOM? Why not apply to BS/MD programs as a highschool Senior along with the premed powerhouse undergrads? What ballpark is "good SAT"?
SAT score:
1300/1600

I don't think that's good enough for a BS/MD program
 

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It seems like you're dreaming of being a doctor ASAP, but since you're still young, there are some things to consider. If you do want to graduate high school in 3 years, great. But I would recommend taking that extra year and travel or do something that you love. It might seem like a big deal now, "wasting" a year, but I guarantee it won't matter if you become a doctor at age 25 or 26. What will be memorable is if you taking that time to explore the world or go and do some shadowing or volunteering to see if this is really something you can commit to for the rest of your life. I don't know too much about the combined BS/MD or BS/DO schools, but I do know that when you apply for med school (after graduating college) they want to see that you have been exposed to the medical field. You can't just get into med school with a good gpa and MCAT score, you need a lot of extracurricular activities. They want to see that you have other life experiences, hobbies, etc.

On a side note, I took some time off after I graduated college and traveled for almost a year (backpacking through some diff countries) before I started medical school. It was the best experience of my life and I would NEVER regret. I also took some of that time and did medical internships overseas, and I always got asked about that during my interviews! Med schools want to see that while you may love medicine, you also have a life outside of it and things you like to do so you don't burn out.

Also, don't go into medical schools having regrets! "I wish I had done that before med school"
Because after you start, you won't have time! It's a lot easier to take the time off now to travel or whatever you want to do after high school or college than after med school.
Don't feel so rushed! :)
Ok thank you so much that was some amazing advice ☺
 

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It's good enough to get into a decent undergrad and do well there! I would just be cautious of signing up for DO this early. It makes life much more difficult if you become interested in competitive specialties/locations. Don't do it just for the security of an early acceptance.
 

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Don't bind yourself to a BS/DO program right now. I would suggest going through college and doing the typical pre-med route. Also suggest going to a state school to minimize your financial debt when this is all said and done.
 

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I don't think there is anything wrong with graduating early if you know what you want to do. Besides in the Western countries, around the world, many people start medical school at age 18. A lot of these students end up working in the US and are just as successful and well-rounded as doctors here.You can still enjoy life along the process. Whether you graduate early or not, you're essentially still going to be either studying or working during those extra years. Finding the right balance is more important. I graduated college a year early and I have no regrets. Undergrad is mostly a waste of time if you are pre-med. About 1/5 of your classes are "pre-med requirements". The rest is filler classes for your major. I have always personally thought that you can condense undergrad to two years by getting rid of humanities and other random requirements.
 

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It seems like you're dreaming of being a doctor ASAP, but since you're still young, there are some things to consider. If you do want to graduate high school in 3 years, great. But I would recommend taking that extra year and travel or do something that you love. It might seem like a big deal now, "wasting" a year, but I guarantee it won't matter if you become a doctor at age 25 or 26. What will be memorable is if you taking that time to explore the world or go and do some shadowing or volunteering to see if this is really something you can commit to for the rest of your life. I don't know too much about the combined BS/MD or BS/DO schools, but I do know that when you apply for med school (after graduating college) they want to see that you have been exposed to the medical field. You can't just get into med school with a good gpa and MCAT score, you need a lot of extracurricular activities. They want to see that you have other life experiences, hobbies, etc.

On a side note, I took some time off after I graduated college and traveled for almost a year (backpacking through some diff countries) before I started medical school. It was the best experience of my life and I would NEVER regret. I also took some of that time and did medical internships overseas, and I always got asked about that during my interviews! Med schools want to see that while you may love medicine, you also have a life outside of it and things you like to do so you don't burn out.

Also, don't go into medical schools having regrets! "I wish I had done that before med school"
Because after you start, you won't have time! It's a lot easier to take the time off now to travel or whatever you want to do after high school or college than after med school.
Don't feel so rushed! :)
I agree with what you said but I think one reason people get burned out from studying is because the process is so long in the US.
 

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I am absolutely sure that I want to become a doctor and have worked in a clinic this whole year, so wouldn't it be better for me to go into the program that will guarantee me succeeding?
 

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I am absolutely sure that I want to become a doctor and have worked in a clinic this whole year, so wouldn't it be better for me to go into the program that will guarantee me succeeding?
As I fellow high-school student I'd personally go for it. However, I'd also advice you to take into consideration what those with more experience than either of us have to say.
 
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I am absolutely sure that I want to become a doctor and have worked in a clinic this whole year, so wouldn't it be better for me to go into the program that will guarantee me succeeding?
Do you know what KIND of doctor and where you want to practice? The answer to this is often no even for entering med students.
 
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I am absolutely sure that I want to become a doctor and have worked in a clinic this whole year, so wouldn't it be better for me to go into the program that will guarantee me succeeding?
What kind of doctor though?

And those linked programs don't "guarantee" anything. I knew a kid that did exactly what you want to do. He ended up with lackluster grades and a sub-20 MCAT, so they didn't take him. You still have to work your butt off to get in, so why not work your butt off to get into an MD program that opens up a lot more doors?
 
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Dr.J.D

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What kind of doctor though?

And those linked programs don't "guarantee" anything. I knew a kid that did exactly what you want to do. He ended up with lackluster grades and a sub-20 MCAT, so they didn't take him. You still have to work your butt off to get in, so why not work your butt off to get into an MD program that opens up a lot more doors?
Isn't DO the same thing as MD, what doors will open
Plus it's a 7 year program so I'll finish a year earlier
And reponding to your question about what Doctor I want to become, won't I get into the same residencies as a MD if I I go into the program?
 

Dr.J.D

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What kind of doctor though?

And those linked programs don't "guarantee" anything. I knew a kid that did exactly what you want to do. He ended up with lackluster grades and a sub-20 MCAT, so they didn't take him. You still have to work your butt off to get in, so why not work your butt off to get into an MD program that opens up a lot more doors?
And if I get into the "linked program" I could work my butt off as you said and maybe get an amazing mcat score and then go to an MD program even though now one has told me how MD is better than DO
 

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Isn't DO the same thing as MD, what doors will open
Plus it's a 7 year program so I'll finish a year earlier
And reponding to your question about what Doctor I want to become, won't I get into the same residencies as a MD if I I go into the program?
Some residencies are virtually impossible to get into as a DO moving forward- derm, plastics, neurosurg, rad onc, ENT, etc are basically off the table. A lot of academic positions and residencies are completely barred to you.
 

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Some residencies are virtually impossible to get into as a DO moving forward- derm, plastics, neurosurg, rad onc, ENT, etc are basically off the table. A lot of academic positions and residencies are completely barred to you.
Internal medicine then cardio fellowship
 

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Do you know what KIND of doctor and where you want to practice? The answer to this is often no even for entering med students.
Internal medicine then cardio fellowship in NY
 

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Internal medicine then cardio fellowship
It's doable, but much harder. And you should also keep in mind that your interests might change- cardiology is a very rough field, and a lot of people tend to be turned off by it as they go through training. So not only are you setting yourself up for a much more difficult time getting into cardiology, but also into every other specialty you might fall for. Don't do this, take it from someone who's made the mistake of trying to save a year (for different reasons) and all the people that have come before me- it isn't worth it most of the time.

You will have a very difficult time matching university IM in NY, particularly the city, as a DO, and an extremely difficult time matching cards, particularly in the city, coming out of the sorts of programs most DOs matriculate to in NY.
 

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It's doable, but much harder. And you should also keep in mind that your interests might change- cardiology is a very rough field, and a lot of people tend to be turned off by it as they go through training. So not only are you setting yourself up for a much more difficult time getting into cardiology, but also into every other specialty you might fall for. Don't do this, take it from someone who's made the mistake of trying to save a year (for different reasons) and all the people that have come before me- it isn't worth it most of the time.

You will have a very difficult time matching university IM in NY, particularly the city, as a DO, and an extremely difficult time matching cards, particularly in the city, coming out of the sorts of programs most DOs matriculate to in NY.
NYITCOM had a 100% match this year but obviously that changes. I want to know if I should try going into a BS/MD program or if I should graduate college in three years then go into med school if I decide not to go to NYITCOM.
I just really want to graduate right now and become a doctor in 7 yrs and match into a good residency anywhere in New York.
 
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NYITCOM had a 100% match this year but obviously that changes. I want to know if I should try going into a BS/MD program or if I should graduate college in three years then go into med school if I decide not to go to NYITCOM.
I just really want to graduate right now and become a doctor in 7 yrs and match into a good residency anywhere in New York.
Not all matches are equal. They may all be matching, but if you compare their list to any US MD school, you'll quickly note that the quality of their matches is substantially lacking. You will not match a good university IM program in NYC coming out of NYCOM, but you might be able to get something in Albany, Rochester, or Buffalo if you play your cards very well.

I would strongly encourage you to stop obsessing over one year saved that could substantially reduce the quality of your remaining 50 years or so on this planet. Most of the good university spots don't go to DOs, they go to MDs, that's just the way it is.
 

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I agree with what you said but I think one reason people get burned out from studying is because the process is so long in the US.
The process is long and short at the same time. It is long because we technically have "8 years" of pre-med (our bachelor's degree) and med school combined, whereas most overseas schools are 6 or so years. At the same time it is short because our first 4 years in university getting our bachelor's is pretty much just a waste of time, and we have to cram everything into the first two years of med school. We can major in anything we want in college and only have to take the specific pre-requisite courses, and we then have to learn EVERYTHING that we need to know in the first two years of med school, since the last two is going to be rotations in clinics and hospitals. So many people burn out because the amount of information that is crammed into the first two years is too much to handle. I'm so envious of people overseas lol, they don't have to apply twice either (once for college and once for med school).
 
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Law2Doc

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I agree with what you said but I think one reason people get burned out from studying is because the process is so long in the US.
Not so much. People get burned out because they zone in on premed way too early and don't take the time to see what other options might be out there. And they certainly don't get burned out because of the high school college end of it, they get burned out by the grueling end, which OP is actually trying to rush into earlier, before s/he is ready.

For someone already cutting high school short you definitely don't want to streamline things further. Med school goes much better for those who have taken the time to know themselves and have put a lot of the angst of high school and college behind them. In the US we intentionally have adopted a model of education that puts college between high school and med school precisely because there's a certain amount of maturation and seasoning that really helps people have the right mindset to be a doctor. Yes it sounds very Ferris Beuller but there's value in stopping to smell the roses and experience (college) life because you can't go back and it's an experience most of us build on in some ways.

Nontrads have been increasing in med school and the average age has been inching UP, not down. Postbac courses before med school are now quite common, at some places the norm. And that's understandable because medicine is very much about death, disease and helping people over very emotional times, and it's helpful if you've lived a little life before you undertake this journey. In short the slow contemplative path is the one that's being embraced over the rush to get on a fast track.

Sounds like the OP has the grades and SAT scores to get into a decent four year college. From there if you do well med school will still be there and you'll be better positioned if you change your mind. As for MD/DO I think it's bizarre that OP would ever want to make that decision now rather than see where s/he is in four years. (Or where osteopathy even is in four years, given the ongoing merger discussions). Four solid years in college and a top MCAT score and OP could potentially be looking at a school of his/her choosing (be it for prestige, cost, research goals), rather than settle for this streamlined but potentially less ideal option.

To lock into a shorter osteopathic path now sort of telegraphs that you don't want to or are afraid to work hard. You are in a rush to call yourself doctor fast, but don't want to spend the time working to actually control any aspects of your destiny, specialty, degree, school etc. This doesn't bode well for your success in this field which requires a lot of patience, fortitude and a willingness to roll up your sleeves and grind away. Maybe this is the kind of stuff you'll want that extra year of college to instil. This 7 year DO path IMHO is thus really a suckers play. You are saving a year but giving up who knows what opportunities. You may end up "a doctor" a year earlier but maybe not the kind you wanted. Osteo schools will still look at you in four years if you do decently and that's your goal. But right now the cards are in your favor to play out the hand and see your cards rather than fold early. Enjoy the college experience, see other options, season emotionally, do well academically and leave the med school commitments for later.
 
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The process is long and short at the same time. It is long because we technically have "8 years" of pre-med (our bachelor's degree) and med school combined, whereas most overseas schools are 6 or so years. At the same time it is short because our first 4 years in university getting our bachelor's is pretty much just a waste of time, and we have to cram everything into the first two years of med school. We can major in anything we want in college and only have to take the specific pre-requisite courses, and we then have to learn EVERYTHING that we need to know in the first two years of med school, since the last two is going to be rotations in clinics and hospitals. So many people burn out because the amount of information that is crammed into the first two years is too much to handle. I'm so envious of people overseas lol, they don't have to apply twice either (once for college and once for med school).
Exactly, I'm jealous of my relatives overseas who get to take actual classes relative to medicine and actually figure out if medicine is right for them while we waste time doing "pre-med" which is not a good preview of medicine. This is why medical schools now have more requirements such as shadowing, hands on experiences and the average matriculant age is going up. You wouldn't have to take a year off to figure out what you want if you started learning much of the basic medical curriculum early on.
 

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OP. I think I may be getting off topic. I personally don't think there is any harm in looking at 6-7 programs. Just make sure you are sure this is what you want to do and that you get as much shadowing as you can before you apply and during the process to develop a better understanding of the career path. I don't think that your maturity is significantly affected because you graduate a year or two earlier. If anything, you end up having to be more mature for your age because of it. That's what my personal experience is. Also, don't limit yourself to just DO accelerated programs. Look at other options as well.
 

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OP. I think I may be getting off topic. I personally don't think there is any harm in looking at 6-7 programs. Just make sure you are sure this is what you want to do and that you get as much shadowing as you can before you apply and during the process to develop a better understanding of the career path. I don't think that your maturity is significantly affected because you graduate a year or two earlier. If anything, you end up having to be more mature for your age because of it. That's what my personal experience is. Also, don't limit yourself to just DO accelerated programs. Look at other options as well.
Yea I am probably just gonna go to a good 4 year school then go to med school or look at MD accelerated schools.
I still have a year to decide so I will use it wisely
 

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Not so much. People get burned out because they zone in on premed way too early and don't take the time to see what other options might be out there. And they certainly don't get burned out because of the high school college end of it, they get burned out by the grueling end, which OP is actually trying to rush into earlier, before s/he is ready.

For someone already cutting high school short you definitely don't want to streamline things further. Med school goes much better for those who have taken the time to know themselves and have put a lot of the angst of high school and college behind them. In the US we intentionally have adopted a model of education that puts college between high school and med school precisely because there's a certain amount of maturation and seasoning that really helps people have the right mindset to be a doctor. Yes it sounds very Ferris Beuller but there's value in stopping to smell the roses and experience (college) life because you can't go back and it's an experience most of us build on in some ways.

Nontrads have been increasing in med school and the average age has been inching UP, not down. Postbac courses before med school are now quite common, at some places the norm. And that's understandable because medicine is very much about death, disease and helping people over very emotional times, and it's helpful if you've lived a little life before you undertake this journey. In short the slow contemplative path is the one that's being embraced over the rush to get on a fast track.

Sounds like the OP has the grades and SAT scores to get into a decent four year college. From there if you do well med school will still be there and you'll be better positioned if you change your mind. As for MD/DO I think it's bizarre that OP would ever want to make that decision now rather than see where s/he is in four years. (Or where osteopathy even is in four years, given the ongoing merger discussions). Four solid years in college and a top MCAT score and OP could potentially be looking at a school of his/her choosing (be it for prestige, cost, research goals), rather than settle for this streamlined but potentially less ideal option.

To lock into a shorter osteopathic path now sort of telegraphs that you don't want to or are afraid to work hard. You are in a rush to call yourself doctor fast, but don't want to spend the time working to actually control any aspects of your destiny, specialty, degree, school etc. This doesn't bode well for your success in this field which requires a lot of patience, fortitude and a willingness to roll up your sleeves and grind away. Maybe this is the kind of stuff you'll want that extra year of college to instil. This 7 year DO path IMHO is thus really a suckers play. You are saving a year but giving up who knows what opportunities. You may end up "a doctor" a year earlier but maybe not the kind you wanted. Osteo schools will still look at you in four years if you do decently and that's your goal. But right now the cards are in your favor to play out the hand and see your cards rather than fold early. Enjoy the college experience, see other options, season emotionally, do well academically and leave the med school commitments for later.
Ok I will definitely look into it more
You are a celebrity in this website so I think that I should listen to you.
 

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Ok I will definitely look into it more
You are a celebrity in this website so I think that I should listen to you.
Don't listen to me because you regard me as a celebrity - I'm not. But you can listen to me because I've been through college and med school and have a pretty good idea of what you are getting yourself into and the right way to go about it.
 
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Why? Some people here are saying don't do it but are not even telling me the reason. Smh
The reasons have already been well elaborated by others in this thread. Regardless of how it's done elsewhere in the world the idea of committing to medical training at 18 is a poor one, especially at the cost of a year of high school and with the goal of a specific IM subspecialty in a specific city--you're almost bound to end up disappointed.
 

Dr.J.D

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The reasons have already been well elaborated by others in this thread. Regardless of how it's done elsewhere in the world the idea of committing to medical training at 18 is a poor one, especially at the cost of a year of high school and with the goal of a specific IM subspecialty in a specific city--you're almost bound to end up disappointed.
I'm actually am not sure about what I want to do for residency but I know I want to do it in New York or Long Island or anywhere in a 1 hour radius. I actually have heard that dos have BETTER chances at getting into residencies because the fact they can take the COMLEX and the USMLE soo... Idk but I have to make up my mind now...
 

mcloaf

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I'm actually am not sure about what I want to do for residency but I know I want to do it in New York or Long Island or anywhere in a 1 hour radius. I actually have heard that dos have BETTER chances at getting into residencies because the fact they can take the COMLEX and the USMLE soo... Idk but I have to make up my mind now...
No, you've been misinformed. The more you post the more it becomes clear that you have very little understanding of how things work with regards to medical school and residency applications. This is exactly why you should wait and go through the process as a regular applicant once you've finished high school and done undergrad. You'll have a much better idea of what you want and how to get there with those intervening years of experience and maturity.
 
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efle

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Going DO will not improve your odds of a New York city area residency, just the opposite
 
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Dr.J.D

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Ok guys thanks everyone who offered their advice :)
 

Law2Doc

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.., I actually have heard that DOs have BETTER chances at getting into residencies because the fact they can take the COMLEX and the USMLE soo...
Um no. At the present date allopathic med school grads fare better in applying to ACGME residencies regardless of what tests a DO has taken. DOs have their own residencies but they are fewer and most osteo grads end up trying for something in the allo match. And if you decide you want something more competitive in the allo match you'll have a much harder road as a DO, in some fields it may still be near impossible. So basically you'll have funneled yourself into a fairly narrow range of potential residencies in order to save a year in what may be a 40+ year career. By contrast if you went to a good 4 year college and did well, you'd have many more choices of med schools and ultimately residencies.

By locking in now you are basically betting against yourself. And frankly if you don't have the faith in yourself for the college level, where a lot of people aren't premed and the competition is relatively weak, that's not going to serve you well going forward in this career when expectations get higher.
 

Mad Jack

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OP. I think I may be getting off topic. I personally don't think there is any harm in looking at 6-7 programs. Just make sure you are sure this is what you want to do and that you get as much shadowing as you can before you apply and during the process to develop a better understanding of the career path. I don't think that your maturity is significantly affected because you graduate a year or two earlier. If anything, you end up having to be more mature for your age because of it. That's what my personal experience is. Also, don't limit yourself to just DO accelerated programs. Look at other options as well.
Kek, people that take the super fast road are often far more emotionally stunted than those that go the normal route. There is no substitute for life experience, and it's a hard thing to make up when your peers are lightyears ahead of you and have little tolerance for your relative immaturity.
 
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