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So I just calculated my GPA... Chances?

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by Jupman, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. Jupman

    2+ Year Member

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    I have been considering going into medicine for the past few years, but I have done nothing about it. I am two classes shy of getting my masters in civil engineering and I will completing it online this fall. After my undergraduate degree I got a job and hated it. I almost left the profession then, but I thought I would give it another chance. This job is 100 times better than my last job, but it's still not doing it for me. I have been working in the engineering field for 3 years or so. I don't hate my job and sometimes it's enjoyable, but I can't stop thinking about being a doctor.

    As of right now, I calculated my GPA using the AAMCAS gpa calculator for applications. I was bored so I figured, why not? It turns out that I have a 3.3sci gpa and a 3.25 non-sci gpa and an overall 3.28 gpa. Now I know this is low, I figure if I ace the remaining prereqs (which won't be easy), I should have an overall gpa around 3.3. I took chem 1 and 2 about 8 years ago or so, so I am planning on taking those again. Plus I have to take orgo 1&2 and bio1&2. Also, I have no ec's that would count towards med school apps. And of course I still have to take the MCAT after that.

    Do you think admission committees would look favorably of someone that changes degrees after getting their masters? I figure they won't like it because I seem like a risk. I need advice...
     
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  3. Jupman

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    The good thing is that I will continue to work while I pursue medical school. That way, just in case I don't get in, I have a back up plan. Just chaing the dream :)
     
  4. phltz

    7+ Year Member

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    Look at the low GPA nontrad success stories thread http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=675835. Your GPA is currently low, but nontrads do absolutely get into med schools with similar GPAs. People get into very good med schools with that kind of GPA.

    You should try to get some sort of clinical experience, whether it be volunteering at a local free clinic, shadowing a doctor, or what have you. Even if the adcoms weren't looking for this, it'd be a good idea for you to see a little bit more of medicine before diving in yourself.

    Academically, you aren't in terrible shape, but you still want to get all of your ducks in a row from here on out. Try to get As in all of your remaining prereqs, and be sure to overprepare for the MCAT. You have to prove that with your newfound interest in medicine comes a newfound motivation to kick ass in school.

    You seem worried that your masters degree will somehow count against you. At the vast majority of schools, especially at the better ones, it will be counted as an asset. Top schools want to put out MDs who will be leaders, trailblazers and innovators. A doctor with a thorough grounding in engineering is much more likely to do this.
     
  5. Jupman

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    Thank you for the advice. My master's GPA is high (3.9) and I have a great upward trend. I don't worry about having the master's degree, I worry about leaving the profession so shortly after recieving the masters. I feel that may be perceived as me wasting time and money.
     
  6. phltz

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    The thing to keep in mind is that most of the members of the admissions committee are doctors, and most doctors are chauvinists. If you tell them "When I was finishing my masters in , I realized that medicine is the best field ever and only that could make me happy," their response will be "Oh, of course." Also keep in mind that there are a ton of useful ways to apply engineering training to the practice of medicine. Your time and money isn't necessarily wasted.
     

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