SOAP and Match Lists

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greentealeaves

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Is there any way to figure out how many people went through the SOAP or unmatched from a given match list. Take WashU's 2019 match list for example, 6 people are listed under transitional. Does that mean 6 people had to SOAP this year? Is there any way to figure out how many people did have to SOAP?

WashU 2019 Match List: Latest Match Results | Medical Student Admissions

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I guess the best approximation would be to count the number of people who matched advanced positions, subtract that from the total number of prelim and TY matches, and you'd have an idea. It wouldn't be perfect, but it would probably be close.

Of course that wouldn't account for anyone who SOAPed into a categorical or advanced position and/or went partially matched. Also it wouldn't account for people who went unmatched in their chosen field and matched in their backup, which most would also consider a pretty bad outcome. It also wouldn't account for people who went completely unmatched and did not SOAP and will either be reapplying or doing something else with their lives.

Edit: in case you don't know what advanced means, fields like ophtho, urology, derm, pm&r, rad onc, DR don't start until PGY-2 so require a preliminary medicine or surgery (or transitional) year.
 
It's impossible, because programs list successful SOAPs as matches, even if into a different field.

My program had something like 8 people not match their chosen fields and SOAP into IM last year. It counted them all as IM matches. The only way people learned about it was word of mouth.

If you successfully SOAP, you get a match day envelope like everyone else. If you're secretive enough, I imagine no one would be the wiser that you didn't initially match.
 
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Is there any way to figure out how many people went through the SOAP or unmatched from a given match list. Take WashU's 2019 match list for example, 6 people are listed under transitional. Does that mean 6 people had to SOAP this year? Is there any way to figure out how many people did have to SOAP?

WashU 2019 Match List: Latest Match Results | Medical Student Admissions
Many/most ophthalmology, dermatology, pathology, anesthesiology, Rad-Onc, PM&R, Neurology and radiology programs start during the PGY-2 year. This means students that match those positions need to find something to do during their PGY-1 year - a Transitional year (more desired as it has more electives built into its schedule so interns in that program can spend some time in their field of choice), or a preliminary medicine or a preliminary surgery spot (you do an intern year is medicine/surgery respectively) before going into your specialty

In theory if you count more preliminary spots than advanced positions, then you may get an idea of how many people did not match into their desired field. But no, you really cannot figure out how many people SOAPed just by looking at a match list because people who SOAP into a categorical spot are going to look just like any other match spot
 
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I don't understand why you premeds are so obsessed with match lists and who does and does not match. It's really a fools errand and a useless time wasting endeavor. And don't give me the "it will help me decide which school to go to" nonsense because people go unmatched all the time from every school. Most of all you will never have access to this information as the schools will never release it since it makes them look bad knowing all these premeds slobbering over their match lists. You absolutely have NO IDEA why someone fails to match. Is it grades? Is it poor clinical reviews? Poor interviewer? Applied to too few programs? Applied with a weak application for their specific field? Applied to a super competitive specialty? Applied to a select geographically restricted area due to personal reasons? I mean the list goes on.

Focus on yourself and try to do the best you can wherever you are. Find mentors that can optimize your application and knows what the field you want is looking for. Will this guarantee a match? NO. This is just how things are. So instead of worrying about things you can't change, focus on the things you actually have control over like minizing debt and going to a place you'll be happy at.
 
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Is there any way to figure out how many people went through the SOAP or unmatched from a given match list. Take WashU's 2019 match list for example, 6 people are listed under transitional. Does that mean 6 people had to SOAP this year? Is there any way to figure out how many people did have to SOAP?

WashU 2019 Match List: Latest Match Results | Medical Student Admissions

TY years are usually highly competitive actually, especially cushy programs like the one in Scripps Mercy that the WashU students matched (average steps>250). I doubt those people had to SOAP.
 
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TY years are usually highly competitive actually, especially cushy programs like the one in Scripps Mercy that the WashU students matched (average steps>250). I doubt those people had to SOAP.


Personal experience. Phenomenal interns year after year. Not just book smart but fantastic interpersonal skills. Much better than I was at their stage of training. About half the slots are reserved for UCSD anesthesia but the rest have typically matched PGY-2 for derm/radiology/ophtho.
 
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Literally no way to know. In addition to the above mentioned reasons when someone failed to even SOAP, they might just be left off the list entirely or be listed under "research" or "business."
 
You absolutely have NO IDEA why someone fails to match.
50% of the people who fail to match were discussed at their school's promotions committee - i.e. had serious red flags prior to even starting the residency app process.
 
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50% of the people who fail to match were discussed at their school's promotions committee - i.e. had serious red flags prior to even starting the residency app process.


I would not be surprised that there would be red flags along the way of someone who failed to match either due to academic or personality/professionalism issues.
 
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