1. The SDN iPhone App is back and free through November! Get it today and please post a review on the App Store!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice

Starting med school (finally), what do you wish you knew?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by medschoolohio, Jul 31, 2011.

  1. medschoolohio

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I know there are some older posts about this, but I wanted some new perspectives!

    I'm starting med school in 2 weeks or so. I was wondering if you could start med school over again what would you change? What's your best advice for someone starting med school? What do you wish you knew before you started?
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Jack is Back

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Messages:
    574
    Likes Received:
    7
    Success concept: There are no new fundamentals.

    The old threads have all the information you need.
     
  4. seelee

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes Received:
    31
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    1) Don't buy a single textbook except for Netter's and First Aid and don't ever buy a textbook new. (I have spent less than 200 dollars for all my med school textbooks and I am in 3rd year now.

    2) No matter what anyone says, you will never, EVER need your own opthalmo/otoscope.

    3) If your school records its lectures, then watch them at home at 2X speed. VLC is a free download and it gives a clearer 2X playback than quicktime.

    4) At the end of each day, look up the topics you studied in First Aid and give them a quick once over so that you can see what is high yield for the boards. It may or may not be high yield for the test (depending on how much of a dick your professor is) but it will help you to recognize what is and is not important early on.
     
  5. plsfoldthx

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Well I am starting med school after doing a BMS and the only thing that really caught me off guard is the sheer amount if details they expect you to just absorb and memorize. While concepts are important and you should know them, they don't really dedicate much lecture time trying to make sure you really get it because there is so much to learn. I am still kinda torn on how to study for the bulk of my classes because I'm a conceptual learner but find that sometimes its just more time efficient to just memorize than play around with conceptual scenarios in your head.
     
  6. OneTyme

    OneTyme Kickin' it ol' school
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    389
    Likes Received:
    42
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Medical Student
    In four weeks you are going to wish you hadn't asked this question and you spent the last two weeks of summer screwing off in the most epic of ways...
     
  7. bcat85

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,776
    Likes Received:
    42
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    1. To repeat the above, you will NEVER need your own otoscope/ophthalmoscope. Never.

    2. No one really spends as much time doing rectals and pelvics as they act like you will when they teach you in your schools clinical skills center. I seriously felt like I was up there all day.

    3. Don't do the whiff test. It'll be obvious from the door.

    4. Buy one set of books for 3rd year rotations and trade them around all year.

    5. Netters/Grants + First Aid + USMLEWorld is all you ever need for first and second year and Step I. Maybe Robbins. Maybe.

    6. Don't prestudy for anything. Seriously.

    7. Despite the sermons you will hear to the contrary, PBL is the most terrible thing I could ever imagine.
     
  8. irJanus

    irJanus Falling into a burning ring of fire
    Physician Faculty 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    709
    Likes Received:
    824
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Ill agree with everything except for PBL... if you're a non-trad student and have been out of classes, if you're self motivated, or if you're geared toward learning by doing... then PBL can be the most amazing learning pathway. You need to know how your learning style is geared.

    my advice for the OP...
    -hard work in the first 2 years generally = high step I score.
     
  9. mmmcdowe

    mmmcdowe Duke of minimal vowels
    Moderator Physician Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    9,686
    Likes Received:
    1,420
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Lol, after all most med students aren't very motivated ;). PBL success is extremely variable depending on the school, the students, and the preceptor.
     
  10. DoctwoB

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,632
    Likes Received:
    641
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    1. Completely true
    2. Depends 100% on your school. We absolutely need our oto/ophtho's and use them frequently.
    3. Or, if your school has a comprehensive syllabus, simply don't go to lecture. Try going. Try watching online. Try not going/not watching. Find what works for you.
    4. agreed.
     
  11. jlimback

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    1. I wish I'd have known how little grades matter the first two years :)

    2. My school had netters and a dissector down in the "dungeon" and almost all of our required texts either online or in the library. Moral here: wait the first couple weeks before going crazy buying books. You'll know right away what you absolutely have to buy, once classes start...and you'll probably find a 2nd year that you can buy them from for next to nothing.

    3. You can make it as fun or as miserable as you'd like. Suit yourself.
     
  12. Jack is Back

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Messages:
    574
    Likes Received:
    7
    Some books may be useful to buy, contrary to some statements above.

    I know some students who have found these books helpful:

    • BRS Physiology
    • Lippincott's Biochem
    • Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple
    • BRS Pathology or RR Pathlogy
    • Medium Robbins
    • Robbins Review Pathlogy Q's
    Also, First Aid Basic Sciences releases pretty soon which could be helpful.
     
  13. Fleur de Me

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    My best piece of advice- stay calm and cool, keep it all in perspective. Be efficient, you don't win any extra points by "spending" (ie. wasting) time sitting in the library for 12 hours everyday if you're not getting enough out of it.

    Seriously, remember that there is a lot of information and learn how to study it best for you.

    Do not pay attention to other people or let them stress you out.
     
  14. mvenus929

    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    6,657
    Likes Received:
    1,404
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    This, I think, is one of the hardest lessons to learn. Just because someone is spending all of their free time in the library doesn't mean you have to (law of diminishing returns). OTOH, if someone is going out and getting wasted every night and showing up to class drunk, that doesn't mean you should be doing that as well.

    Figure out what works best for you. By all means, listen to those who have tread the path before you, but don't take their words as gold.
     
  15. armybound

    armybound urologist.
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,778
    Likes Received:
    389
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Biggest thing is just to relax.

    You'll think you need a zillion books, but you don't.
    You'll think everyone else is studying so much more than you are, but they're not.
    You'll think you're going to fail, but you won't.
    You'll think you won't have time to do anything fun, but you will.

    Take the experience in. You're going to be one of privileged few people who get to see and do the things you're going to be doing. Your classmates are going to be some really cool people. Your lecturers and attendings are going to be awesome.
     
  16. AlexMorph

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    5,527
    Likes Received:
    18
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    There is no substitute for hard work
     
  17. MilkmanAl

    MilkmanAl Al the Ass Mod
    Physician 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Messages:
    12,032
    Likes Received:
    59
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    ...other than efficiency.

    I am/was all of those things and STRONGLY prefer a lecture-based system that allows me to skip class all the time and, you know, use that self-motivation. Required attendance in med school is crap, regardless of what kind of teaching system is used.

    Other than that, I second just about all the advice here. Don't blow your cash on an ophthalmoscope. Don't blow your cash on books. Don't freak out trying to study 25 hours a day. Enjoy yourself, and realize that failure is very unlikely.
     
  18. surftheiop

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,940
    Likes Received:
    27
    To people saying not to buy many/any books, don't you need to buy the medical interview/ physical exam books that they require for the MS1 clinical skills class or whatever they call it?
     
  19. irJanus

    irJanus Falling into a burning ring of fire
    Physician Faculty 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    709
    Likes Received:
    824
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    :shrug:
    you're right, but in different ways. It's an entirely different ball game when someone sets Robbins Patho in front of you, tells you to read p. 1-900 and then says, "see you in 5 weeks for a test that comprises 1/3 of your GPA for the semester" vs. a series of lecture slides and lectures highlighting the important HY points. That's more what I meant. That said, either way is equally challenging, just gotta go with how you're geared to learn. Self motivation isn't the same as motivation in general ;) ... Edit: and you're absolutely right, it very much depends on the school and how they run the program!

    also, :thumbup: to not letting others study methods/scores/ect get you anxious or down.
     
  20. armybound

    armybound urologist.
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,778
    Likes Received:
    389
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    honestly, not really. and besides, you still don't know if you'll be given them.
     
  21. surftheiop

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,940
    Likes Received:
    27
    They gave us a list of "Required Textbooks to buy before MS1"

    so Im guessing they arent planning on giving us anything free, but maybe I will get one from an upperclassmen or something
     
  22. armybound

    armybound urologist.
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,778
    Likes Received:
    389
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    that's what we've been saying. don't rush out so fast to buy stuff.

    we were required to buy Bates. they beat it into us over and over. I did read a little bit of Bates, twice, right before the midterm and right before the final... then I found a summary that a classmate had made, put Bates away, and read the notes instead.

    books are rarely ever absolutely necessary in med school, unless they want you to physically have the book in front of you in their presence at some point.
     
  23. SMCmedicine

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    This is really important. It's so hard to calm yourself down and just do your own thing. The sooner you can get into your own rhythm the sooner you will enjoy school.
     
  24. OpalOnyx

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    Messages:
    561
    Likes Received:
    2
    I love this. Looking back, I think the one pearl of wisdom I'd give myself as a MS1 is to be calm, stay calm, and to not make such a big deal out of everything. It's a marathon and not a sprint. Therefore the approach is totally different. Study and master information for the long haul. Always keep in mind that Step 1 lies ahead in 2 years and think of preclinical classes as a foundation, with purpose (and not just passing the next exam! although that too is important).

    Also, it's time to get out of the pre-med mindset of anxiety and uncertainty and constantly working to impress impress impress and show the world LOOK I REALLY WANNA BE A DOCTOR I PROMISE

    If I could go back, I wish I had a calmer first year. And realize that now that I'm in, until rotations begin, there's nothing I really have to do other than study and do well on exams. There's no one to impress and no one to prove anything to anymore. No extracurricular requirement. No need to stand out from classmates as "smartest" like back in pre-med. It's just grades from here on out for 2 years.
     
  25. Elbowstoopointy

    Elbowstoopointy U aware?

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2011
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    that the world is not all sunshine and rainbows

    [youtube]uASVzkrEKgs[/youtube]
     
  26. TheMan21

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Some people in here are saying that grades don't matter and that you don't need to impress anyone, but this isn't necessarily true. I'm betting that you don't know what specialty you want to pursue, and if you do, chances are good that you'll change your mind. If you decide later on that you want to go for a ROAD specialty or some other diffcult surgical specialty, you will wish that you had worried about your grades. Granted, they may not be as important as your Step I score, but when you're going up against other students with good Step I scores AND good grades, you need to make sure all areas of your application look good. You don't need to kill yourself studying but P=MD and other similar mentalities could limit your choices later on. Don't settle for mediocrity.
     
  27. futIDdoc

    futIDdoc Fighter of the Nightman
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    You're reputation is more important than your grades. (Although grades and board scores are important!)
    1. Never lie, tell the truth....always.
    2. Never speak ill of a resident, attending, or student in mixed company. Medicine is a VERY small community.
    3. Never make another student or intern look bad. Revenge will be swift and brutal.
    4. You are not special, so don't act like it. Be humble yet confident.
     
  28. Lil Mick

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    30
    Status:
    MD/PhD Student
    1) You need to study to do well in your classes, and studying does not consist of looking at your notes right before the exam...
    2) That being said, don't give up all of the things that make you happy--family, friends, hobbies... Unless you have your sights set on a really competitive residency, the extra two hours a day of work for an extra 5% isn't worth it.
    3) Sign up for small groups with the people from your class you know and like. It will make any 8-hour day of small groups so much less miserable if you can joke around with your friends during it.
     
  29. Shadowmoses

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2011
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    7
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I'm glad I'm not the only one who bought lots of books at first and then never use them after first semester. review books + Wikipedia + lecture notes seems to be enough for me.
     
  30. Substance

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,224
    Likes Received:
    189
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    0. The goal of medical school is to match well, not to graduate. The same way as the goal of your undergrad is to get into medical school, not to graduate.

    1. Anything that is "mandatory attendance" is useless- PBL, ethics sessions, special interest group lectures etc. Bring a book or mp3 player to pass the time.
    2. Don't be afraid to decline stupid research projects from staff if you are not interested or don't have an idea of what specialty you want to pursue.
    3. Don't spend any time focusing on projects or efforts related to primary care even if you're interested. You'll still match to primary care(though why you'd want to is beyond me) without it, but if you want to do ROAD etc it won't help you match. It's wasted time.
    4. Look the part - dress professionally, keep your hair trimmed, and walk tall.
    5. Don't get wrapped up in class drama. Keep a life outside of your class. Most of your classmates will be total losers anyway.
    6. Set goals to make you a strong candidate for the match: High step 1, AOA etc.
     
  31. VisionaryTics

    VisionaryTics SeƱor Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,912
    Likes Received:
    2,279
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Don't assume that someone else's study habits will work for you, even if they are doing well. Find your own rhythm in studying and class-going.

    This means (counter to SDN dogma):

    1. You may actually get something out of going to class. Don't assume you won't learn anything, and don't try to convince yourself that you get more out of listening to lectures later if you don't.
    2. You may actually get something out of textbooks.


    Basically, keep your mind open, find out what works for you, and don't be so stressed out that you desperately try to replicate all of your classmates' study habits.
     
  32. Jack is Back

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Messages:
    574
    Likes Received:
    7
    Enjoyed this post.
     
  33. Lbgem

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    This is something I will have to watch out for/work on. I usually complain to a close friend/co-worker about people I work with (i.e. person I worked with constantly f*s up experiments and blames other people for her mistakes). I just dislike working with this person. I'm cordial but that's about all I can muster.

    Thanks you guys for the helpful posts.
     
  34. yamaraja808

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Didn't enjoy that part.
     
  35. mvenus929

    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    6,657
    Likes Received:
    1,404
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    We were supposed to buy it, and they listed chapters that we were supposed to read, but only one person in my group did, and we manage fine on the interviewing and physical exam skills.

    Third year grades matter. If you're at a P/F school, as long as you pass, your preclinical grades make very little difference in the long run. And considering how much more you generally have to study to get those few extra points, many people will decide it's a much better use of their time to enjoy their lives.
     
  36. Lil Mick

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    30
    Status:
    MD/PhD Student
    Especially if your school doesn't keep track of class rank because it's P/F for preclinical and/or clinical years... Not worth the extra effort. Just rock step 1.
     
  37. Dr Gerrard

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,044
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    what if my school is honors/pass/fail for all of medical school

    to stay competitive, do i need to strive for honors the entire time, or is it just more important to get honors in third year?
     
  38. BlueElmo

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Messages:
    14,413
    Likes Received:
    23
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Before med school, I thought I was pretty smart. Afterwards, I realized I'm not that smart.
     
  39. Funky

    Funky This space is for sale
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,660
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    People will give you a million different pieces of advice and you need to figure out what works best for you and what doesn't.
     
  40. anbuitachi

    anbuitachi ASA Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,782
    Likes Received:
    1,116
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    :thumbup:
     
  41. Bumbl3b33

    Removed

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Is this a prevalent paradigm among medical students? If so, I think I might need to keep myself far, far away from my classmates. Not everyone wants a cushy lifestyle or specialty, homie.
     
  42. Mace1370

    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Messages:
    754
    Likes Received:
    71
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    1. If it's mandatory, then chances are it is a huge waste of time.
    2. There are a million resources out there. With a few exceptions (First Aid, USMLE World) you need to figure out what works for you. Look at your classmates' books, or go to the library and see if you can flip through a copy of a review book you are interested in there.
    3. Work hard and keep your doors open.
     
  43. Baron Samedi

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    196
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    You can't read everything so only read the best things.
     
  44. ejw5075

    ejw5075 Smile.
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    Messages:
    606
    Likes Received:
    32
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Not having a dress code does not mean you get to wear whatever you want, on or off campus.
     
  45. MeatTornado

    MeatTornado On Sabbatical
    Physician 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,822
    Likes Received:
    2,884
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    my advice is try your best not to be like this guy and if you see someone like this guy around stay as far away as possible.

    my response to the above list:
    0. the goal of med school is to learn medicine so you can be a competent doctor. everything else should fall into place (i hope, but so far it seems to be true)
    1. the ethics sessions are probably going to be more important in the long run. it's only my second month of rotations and we've already discusses a couple of ethical dilemmas with the attending. Having already thought about them and discussed them during the first two years was definitely important. In general there is a reason why you're being taught certain things so just be engaged rather than resistant because you don't know what's coming down the road.
    2. if you don't want to do something you should decline, yes
    3. the hostility in this "advice" is really strange. do whatever you enjoy doing.

    i don't regret getting involved in things outside of class during 1st and 2nd year. also i wish i had worried a bit less about grades first and second year. i was never in danger of failing anything yet i stressed out a bit too much (ended up honoring only two classes). now looking back i realize that none of that mattered once i got my step 1 score.
     
  46. thepoopologist

    thepoopologist Ph.D in Clinical Meconium
    Classifieds Approved 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    704
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I would withdraw from medical school.

    Given no choice but to start, I'd make friends with the smartest, least neurotic people in class.

    I wouldn't spend money on anything school related unless absolutely necessary. Don't buy books/equipment because people suggest that you do. Buy them when need them.
     
  47. lastcall

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,844
    Likes Received:
    2
    Maintain your relationships with non-medical friends and loved ones.
    Your classmates will soon drive you crazy around exam time. Stay away from those types. You'll soon know what I mean.
    G'luck.
     
  48. Lbgem

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I'd probably add stay away from forums during test/USMLE time as well. Can't tell you how many times I panicked cause of some schmuck on SDN with the 'world is going to end tomorrow if you don't do X...' attitude. I'm getting a thicker skin as time goes on though.
     
  49. ArcGurren

    ArcGurren only one will survive
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,920
    Likes Received:
    13
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Sigh.

    0. No. The goal of medical school is to make you a competent medical professional above all else, in addition to matching. I dislike this mindset very much. Just because one may want to match in, say, Ophthalmology, does not mean you disregard or make light of what you learn in all your rotations. Being a well-rounded doctor is incredibly important.

    1. Knowing your biomedical ethics is absolutely important. I've had to deal with more than one case involving child services, and there's definitely been times where confidentiality has been an issue. I've known people to royally F up something because they didn't understand the basics of their bioethics. Also, for the gunners out there, this is something you do need to know for Step 1, so don't make light of it. PBL sessions... this is a matter of opinion as I usually learned more about actual clinical medicine from PBL sessions than I did from listening to some moron lecture about Tay-sachs Disease.

    2 and 3. This is absolutely not true. I know someone who matched Urology and one of their projects was a community health awareness one. It helped open the doors for many other urology-related projects and it was brought up during interviews. Some research is always better than no research. And your general disdain for primary care is nasty and uncalled for, especially from a resident. There is such a thing as highly competitive Medicine or Peds or Med/Peds programs by the way... by comparison there are many ROAD programs, particularly in Anesthesia, which are very easy to match.

    4. Yeah, no. In 3rd year, dress professionally. In first and second year, you can go to class in scrubs and pajamas.

    5. This I partially agree with, but no, not everyone in your class is a "loser". Many are melodramatic idiots, yes, but there's always people you can find who understand/you get along with.

    6. If you don't get AOA it's not the end of the world. I am in the top quintile of my class and not a contender for AOA. I don't really care. Step 1 score on the other hand does make a pretty big difference but getting a relatively lower score will not rule you out of a specialty... it may make it harder but there are other ways to bolster your application (including 3rd year grades, research, LORs, audition rotations, etc.)

    Please, see through the horse crap, people who are reading through this thread. I have no desire to go into primary care personally but knocking people who do is pathetic.
     
  50. sylvanthus

    sylvanthus EM/IM/CC PGY-6
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    2,881
    Likes Received:
    598
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Ehhhh I don't know, you gave the politically correct version, he gave the real version. Depends on how you look at it. Of course we are here to learn medicine, but the real goal since we are going to learn it no matter what, is to match well.

    Also, I agree that the ethics sessions and that type of thing are worthless. You either are or are not ethical, I'm sorry, these sessions aren't going to change anything.
     
  51. sylvanthus

    sylvanthus EM/IM/CC PGY-6
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    2,881
    Likes Received:
    598
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]

    Is that not what the steps are for, to make sure we are competent? So this is the baseline, not the goal. Every medical student graduate should be competent. Therefore, the goal becomes matching into a decent program, not just being competent.

    As for the biomedical ethics part, you are citing personal examples, no need to say anything more about that.
     

Share This Page