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Texas (TSBEP) Jurisprudence Exam Tips

Sterfry05

New Member
Jan 16, 2020
3
5
    I'm shocked a thread on the Texas Jurisprudence Exam doesn't exist. Did I just miss it? Although the pressure is greatly reduced compared to the EPPP, before I went to take the Jurisprudence Exam, I felt like I wanted some input/advice from others who had taken it. I hope this post is helpful to anyone else in search of tips for the Texas Jurisprudence Exam:

    WARNING (and my main motivator for posting this): on your final question the button that you previously used to save your answer to each question becomes the "submit exam" button. I hit it thinking I was saving my answer to #118 and instead I submitted my entire exam!! No warning box, no color change of the button, nothing...my exam was submitted and locked. Yikes!! I had made note of 5 questions that I wanted to go back and review (hunt longer for the word-for-word answer), but I couldn't! I panicked, clicked back a hundred times, yelped at the thought of having to pay for it again if I failed, and then got an email saying I'd passed. Phew. In the end, I didn't waste any more time hunting for info to confirm those answers, but submitting unintentionally is never ideal. Be warned! It's not a highly sophisticated platform so you can't navigate between questions easily and the submission button is sneaky on that last question!

    Other helpful info:
    1)The Jurisprudence Exam for licensing as a Psychologist is different than the Texas Medical Jurisprudence Exam. It may sound like a silly distinction to point out, but it was news to me when I figured it out.

    2) The exam is untimed (2 week completion window starting the day you register), you can take it over multiple sittings, it's 100+ questions (my version was 118) that include some demographic questions and experimental, non-scored items. 90% is the minimum passing score.

    3) Preparation method: none - except locating the various reference materials. I pulled up the Texas Adminstrative Code Title 22, Part 21 (Texas Board of Examiners of Psychologists) and the PDF of TSBEP Acts and Rules. I used cntrl/find, Google search, and scanning to locate keywords and answers.

    In my experience about 25% I could answer without using any references, 50% I used the reference materials to confirm my best guess, 25% of the questions I could narrow it down to a few good answers but had to really hunt to confirm the answer in the reference materials.

    I took the exam in about 5 hours over multiple sittings and passed with 94%.

    Good luck! Hope this helps and you've got this!
     
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    Justanothergrad

    Counseling Psychologist
    7+ Year Member
  • Mar 2, 2013
    2,145
    2,429
      tip #1 learn about being a school psychologist since it dominates the test

      tip#2 have multiple monitors to enable word for word checking.

      Id agree with your 25/50/25 estimate, lots of tiny details you need to literally check exact wording for (see #2). Otherwise, its not bad. More annoying and harder than other states I've taken them in. This one just takes time and is annoying. I passed in 4ish hours with a 95. It's a good thing the sunset clause kicked in to avoid the oral exam although the board is still backed up now because of COVID.
       
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      L.A.PSYD

      New Member
      2+ Year Member
      Mar 17, 2018
      3
      0
      1. Post Doc
        Thank you both so much! I plan on taking this exam in the next month or so. Do either of you Sterfry05 or Justanothergrad have any advise on applying to Texas Licensure for Psychologists from out-of-state? The process seems a bit daunting (i.e. Provisionally Lic. Psychologist vs. Lic. Psychologist). I will be moving my CA lic to TX and have the information needed for ASBBP Plus application nearly complete. Any tips on how to best stream-line the process, email vs. calling the TX board, time-frame to be obtain approval to take Jurisprudence exam and finally get licensed? Thank you so much! I appreciate all the help!
         

        mmksu

        New Member
        Aug 4, 2020
        1
        0
        1. Psychologist
          Hi,
          Thanks for the info. I'm also in the process of applyng for TX licensure (currently lic. in IL). I found the PLUS/ASPPB & TSBEP guidelines for application confusing (daunting as well). Paid multiple fees & submitted applications/uploaded materials for both. One instruction states submit PLUS/ASPPB info before application to board, another states TSBE will contact ASPPB about my application and a "specialist"' will be assigned? I completed via certified mail and over one week have yet to receive confirmation. Delays due to COVID? Also, someone mentioned the Oral Exam and sunset law/COVID, which I'm having trouble getting clarification on. Didn't see anything about oral exam in my prep materials. It appears there are not study materials. We're to simply reference or study state bylaws etc. Finally, I'm wondering if we should be aware of any updates with telehealth/COVID that may not be reflected in current materials, but we will be expected to know? Sorry for long post. Thanks in advance.
           

          bookwormpsych

          Full Member
          Feb 11, 2020
          108
          102
          1. Psychology Student
            Hi,
            Thanks for the info. I'm also in the process of applyng for TX licensure (currently lic. in IL). I found the PLUS/ASPPB & TSBEP guidelines for application confusing (daunting as well). Paid multiple fees & submitted applications/uploaded materials for both. One instruction states submit PLUS/ASPPB info before application to board, another states TSBE will contact ASPPB about my application and a "specialist"' will be assigned? I completed via certified mail and over one week have yet to receive confirmation. Delays due to COVID? Also, someone mentioned the Oral Exam and sunset law/COVID, which I'm having trouble getting clarification on. Didn't see anything about oral exam in my prep materials. It appears there are not study materials. We're to simply reference or study state bylaws etc. Finally, I'm wondering if we should be aware of any updates with telehealth/COVID that may not be reflected in current materials, but we will be expected to know? Sorry for long post. Thanks in advance.

            Right now the board is in the process of a huge database transition with other mental health boards in the state. That could have an impact on their response time. I applied for the master's level license and they were quick pretty much all steps of the way. All during COVID as well. I sent in my app and fees, they accepted within 2 weeks. I then applied to take the EPPP, they approved quickly. Same with the Jurisprudence.

            Regarding the telehealth info, I don't think they're being sneaky about that. I took the Jurisprudence about two weeks ago. All the materials I needed were the boards Acts and Rules, the Texas Administrative Code, and Google. It was a nit-picky exam but also straight forward. Everything they asked could be found with those three things.
             

            cem22

            Full Member
            2+ Year Member
            Dec 14, 2016
            18
            1
            1. Psychologist
              I am also applying through PLUS and currently licensed in another state, and I haven't found it to be very streamlined either. I started filling out the sections, but didn't get assigned a "licensing specialist" until maybe 7 days later. The Supplemental Form section at the bottom listed some forms as "optional." I interpreted this at face value and completed everything else. I was able to "Submit for ASPPB Review," but after a few weeks I inquired about my status and was told that they needed those forms that were listed as "Optional." I had those forms mailed from the respective sources and inquired again a few weeks later to see if they were received and they still have not been. Needless to say, it has been a process.

              Now it looks like the checklist for licensure is a little different after they did their database transition (which they also delayed making available after their Sept. 1st unveiling), adding to the confusion (i.e., Licensed Psychologist Checklist & Licensure Process vs. LP Issuance). I'm assuming the former is submitted first, which now doesn't require Internship and Postdoc Hours Verification forms until you submit for License Issuance, but it does request a Self-Query Report from the National Practitioner Database? Also, it requires proof of passage of the Jurisprudence Exam, which must be completed before applying (for before a provisional license?). Does that mean we don't have to have a provisional license in order to take the Jurisprudence Exam? I'm waiting a response from the board for clarification, but if anyone has found this information out or has interpreted this all differently - please share!
               

              Siyu

              Full Member
              Aug 9, 2019
              21
              3
              1. Pre-Psychology
                Right now the board is in the process of a huge database transition with other mental health boards in the state. That could have an impact on their response time. I applied for the master's level license and they were quick pretty much all steps of the way. All during COVID as well. I sent in my app and fees, they accepted within 2 weeks. I then applied to take the EPPP, they approved quickly. Same with the Jurisprudence.

                Regarding the telehealth info, I don't think they're being sneaky about that. I took the Jurisprudence about two weeks ago. All the materials I needed were the boards Acts and Rules, the Texas Administrative Code, and Google. It was a nit-picky exam but also straight forward. Everything they asked could be found with those three things.

                I am at the master level in Psych, going to take EPPP next month. Do have any advice?
                 

                bookwormpsych

                Full Member
                Feb 11, 2020
                108
                102
                1. Psychology Student
                  I am at the master level in Psych, going to take EPPP next month. Do have any advice?


                  Advice for taking the EPPP or just general Texas application things?

                  I can do both lol.
                  EPPP advice: I'm probably not the best person to ask. I did everything the wrong way. I didn't study an extended time, and even took a month break of studying when my test was moved from April to June when COVID hit. But, somehow, it worked out. I used PrepJet services, which were awesome and concise. I also did not take breaks during the test, that would've caused me to panic knowing my time was still ticking when I got up. Also, had to wear a mask the whole time - took my glasses off because they fogged up which caused me to be partially blind. But, my biggest thing was paying attention to what my body was saying - i.e., sweatiness, increased heart rate, etc. When I noticed those things I just reminded myself that I can only do my best and hat it's just a dumb test. I tried not thinking about the fact that my license relied on the test. When I became frustrated, I would stare at the ceiling until my head cleared. For me, it was anxiety management. But everyone's experience is different. Just remind yourself that the test does not define who you are.


                  Texas application things: Be patient. They're going through a lot, however, are still timely in doing things. I took the jurisprudence and was issued a license approximately 10 days later. (still haven't got my actual fancy license in the mail, but it was posted to the TBSEP website with my license number).
                   

                  Siyu

                  Full Member
                  Aug 9, 2019
                  21
                  3
                  1. Pre-Psychology
                    Advice for taking the EPPP or just general Texas application things?

                    I can do both lol.
                    EPPP advice: I'm probably not the best person to ask. I did everything the wrong way. I didn't study an extended time, and even took a month break of studying when my test was moved from April to June when COVID hit. But, somehow, it worked out. I used PrepJet services, which were awesome and concise. I also did not take breaks during the test, that would've caused me to panic knowing my time was still ticking when I got up. Also, had to wear a mask the whole time - took my glasses off because they fogged up which caused me to be partially blind. But, my biggest thing was paying attention to what my body was saying - i.e., sweatiness, increased heart rate, etc. When I noticed those things I just reminded myself that I can only do my best and hat it's just a dumb test. I tried not thinking about the fact that my license relied on the test. When I became frustrated, I would stare at the ceiling until my head cleared. For me, it was anxiety management. But everyone's experience is different. Just remind yourself that the test does not define who you are.


                    Texas application things: Be patient. They're going through a lot, however, are still timely in doing things. I took the jurisprudence and was issued a license approximately 10 days later. (still haven't got my actual fancy license in the mail, but it was posted to the TBSEP website with my license number).
                    Thank you so much for replying me here.

                    I have prepared EPPP for an extended time, I think. Whenever I feel I am ready, I realize there are so many blank spots I haven't acknolweged about. I have submitted my test application. I use Psychprep to prepare my exam, but my score isn't improving enough to help me gain confidence. I am a kind of panic. I don't know if I should focus on testing questions, or on the study materials.
                     

                    madpsych78

                    Full Member
                    7+ Year Member
                    Aug 16, 2011
                    61
                    29
                    1. Psychology Student
                      I need to comment. I just took the EPPP and Jurisprudence. I passed the EPPP on July 1st; I passed the Jurisprudence on September 7th (Labor Day).

                      My experience is different from others in that I had way more problems passing the Jurisprudence than the EPPP. Yes, I prepared for the EPPP for several months using Psychprep, but I was at least able to pass it with flying colors on the first try (score of 633).

                      I failed the Jurisprudence on my first two attempts. The first time I earned an 84 and the second time I earned an 85 (you need a 90 to pass). Yes, it is open book/open resource, but I was initially under the impression that there was only a two-hour window to complete the exam online. Yes, you have 14 days from the date of registration to complete the exam, but the exam time I thought was two hours. It was NEVER made clear (and still not clear to me) whether it was two hours in one sitting, or two hours cumulative.

                      I took the Jurisprudence the first two times in spring of 2019. I waited over a year to take it the third time (I'm in a two-year post doc and I was required to pass my exams by January of 2021). I took it earlier this month as I said and passed with a 91. I still finished within a two-hour window because I just didn't know any better.

                      I think the factors that helped me pass it the third time were 1) taking the EPPP first, as there is some overlap with ethics; and 2) really outlining where things were in the resources I had, so that I could look them up really quickly. I had the Psychologist's Licensing Act, but also the Texas Law and the Practice of Psychology (12th edition). I had the Table of Contents of the Psychologist's Licensing Act printed out (but not the entire Act as it is like 180 pages long), so then I could use the Table of Contents to guide me to where I needed to look up the information in my PDF of the Psychologist's Licensing Act. There was some overlap between the Psychologist's Licensing Act and the Texas Law book so I notated where there was overlap.

                      Now. Here's the deal. As has already been stated in this thread, the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists (TSBEP) is being subsumed into the Texas Behavioral Health Executive Council (TBHEC), which is not only comprised of psychologists but other licensed mental health providers in Texas. Since I took the EPPP before the transition, the ASPPB automatically sent my scores to the then-TSBEP. The TSBEP then let me know that the EPPP score was received and that I passed. When I took the Jurisprudence the third time after the transition, I received an email from Darryl Spinks indicating that I passed the Jurisprudence, and my exact score was also provided. However, TBHEC is not automatically notified that I passed. I had to forward that email to Monica Fiero (she's the licensing specialist for psychologists in Texas), and she said to allow 20 business days for the processing of my score and for my license to be issued. (I'm not sure whether that also changed for the EPPP since I took it before the transition.)

                      Monica Fiero then said that I will receive written correspondence as to the next steps that I have to take in order to become fully licensed. But, it is important to know that under the TBHEC, there is no longer a separate application for a Provisionally Licensed Psychologist, which is what I had completed and submitted pre-TBHEC. Once the license is issued, I would be considered a "Licensed Psychologist with Provisional Status," and I would imagine that I would merely have to submit documentation showing evidence that I have completed at least the minimum hours of supervised experiences (both internship and post doc). Hopefully the next steps will indicate where I can submit said information as well as the timeline I have for doing so.
                       

                      Siyu

                      Full Member
                      Aug 9, 2019
                      21
                      3
                      1. Pre-Psychology
                        I need to comment. I just took the EPPP and Jurisprudence. I passed the EPPP on July 1st; I passed the Jurisprudence on September 7th (Labor Day).

                        My experience is different from others in that I had way more problems passing Jurisprudence than the EPPP. Yes, I prepared for the EPPP for several months using Psychprep, but I was at least able to pass it with flying colors on the first try (score of 633).

                        I failed the Jurisprudence on my first two attempts. The first time I earned an 84 and the second time I earned an 85 (you need a 90 to pass). Yes, it is open book/open resource, but I was initially under the impression that there was only a two-hour window to complete the exam online. Yes, you have 14 days from the date of registration to complete the exam, but the exam time I thought was two hours. It was NEVER made clear (and still not clear to me) whether it was two hours in one sitting, or two hours cumulative.

                        I took the Jurisprudence the first two times in spring of 2019. I waited over a year to take it the third time (I'm in a two-year post doc and I was required to pass my exams by January of 2021). I took it earlier this month as I said and passed with a 91. I still finished within a two-hour window because I just didn't know any better.

                        I think the factors that helped me pass it the third time were 1) taking the EPPP first, as there is some overlap with ethics; and 2) really outlining where things were in the resources I had, so that I could look them up really quickly. I had the Psychologist's Licensing Act, but also the Texas Law and the Practice of Psychology (12th edition). I had the Table of Contents of the Psychologist's Licensing Act printed out (but not the entire Act as it is like 180 pages long), so then I could use the Table of Contents to guide me to where I needed to look up the information in my PDF of the Psychologist's Licensing Act. There was some overlap between the Psychologist's Licensing Act and the Texas Law book so I notated where there was overlap.

                        Now. Here's the deal. As has already been stated in this thread, the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists (TSBEP) is being subsumed into the Texas Behavioral Health Executive Council (TBHEC), which is not only comprised of psychologists but other licensed mental health providers in Texas. Since I took the EPPP before the transition, the ASPPB automatically sent my scores to the then-TSBEP. The TSBEP then let me know that the EPPP score was received and that I passed. When I took the Jurisprudence the third time after the transition, I received an email from Darryl Spinks indicating that I passed the Jurisprudence, and my exact score was also provided. However, TBHEC is not automatically notified that I passed. I had to forward that email to Monica Fiero (she's the licensing specialist for psychologists in Texas), and she said to allow 20 business days for the processing of my score and for my license to be issued. (I'm not sure whether that also changed for the EPPP since I took it before the transition.)

                        Monica Fiero then said that I will receive written correspondence as to the next steps that I have to take in order to become fully licensed. But, it is important to know that under the TBHEC, there is no longer a separate application for a Provisionally Licensed Psychologist, which is what I had completed and submitted pre-TBHEC. Once the license is issued, I would be considered a "Licensed Psychologist with Provisional Status," and I would imagine that I would merely have to submit documentation showing evidence that I have completed at least the minimum hours of supervised experiences (both internship and post doc). Hopefully the next steps will indicate where I can submit said information as well as the timeline I have for doing so.
                        I know the majority of your experience you shared here is about Jurisprudence Test, but I still want to ask your experience of studying EPPP. I used the Psychprep as well. How do you feel about the exam? Does the Psychprep do a good job on covering the knowledge in the EPPP?
                        I have scheduled my exam in 10/30, i am kind of nervous.
                         

                        Siyu

                        Full Member
                        Aug 9, 2019
                        21
                        3
                        1. Pre-Psychology
                          I need to comment. I just took the EPPP and Jurisprudence. I passed the EPPP on July 1st; I passed the Jurisprudence on September 7th (Labor Day).

                          My experience is different from others in that I had way more problems passing the Jurisprudence than the EPPP. Yes, I prepared for the EPPP for several months using Psychprep, but I was at least able to pass it with flying colors on the first try (score of 633).

                          I failed the Jurisprudence on my first two attempts. The first time I earned an 84 and the second time I earned an 85 (you need a 90 to pass). Yes, it is open book/open resource, but I was initially under the impression that there was only a two-hour window to complete the exam online. Yes, you have 14 days from the date of registration to complete the exam, but the exam time I thought was two hours. It was NEVER made clear (and still not clear to me) whether it was two hours in one sitting, or two hours cumulative.

                          I took the Jurisprudence the first two times in spring of 2019. I waited over a year to take it the third time (I'm in a two-year post doc and I was required to pass my exams by January of 2021). I took it earlier this month as I said and passed with a 91. I still finished within a two-hour window because I just didn't know any better.

                          I think the factors that helped me pass it the third time were 1) taking the EPPP first, as there is some overlap with ethics; and 2) really outlining where things were in the resources I had, so that I could look them up really quickly. I had the Psychologist's Licensing Act, but also the Texas Law and the Practice of Psychology (12th edition). I had the Table of Contents of the Psychologist's Licensing Act printed out (but not the entire Act as it is like 180 pages long), so then I could use the Table of Contents to guide me to where I needed to look up the information in my PDF of the Psychologist's Licensing Act. There was some overlap between the Psychologist's Licensing Act and the Texas Law book so I notated where there was overlap.

                          Now. Here's the deal. As has already been stated in this thread, the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists (TSBEP) is being subsumed into the Texas Behavioral Health Executive Council (TBHEC), which is not only comprised of psychologists but other licensed mental health providers in Texas. Since I took the EPPP before the transition, the ASPPB automatically sent my scores to the then-TSBEP. The TSBEP then let me know that the EPPP score was received and that I passed. When I took the Jurisprudence the third time after the transition, I received an email from Darryl Spinks indicating that I passed the Jurisprudence, and my exact score was also provided. However, TBHEC is not automatically notified that I passed. I had to forward that email to Monica Fiero (she's the licensing specialist for psychologists in Texas), and she said to allow 20 business days for the processing of my score and for my license to be issued. (I'm not sure whether that also changed for the EPPP since I took it before the transition.)

                          Monica Fiero then said that I will receive written correspondence as to the next steps that I have to take in order to become fully licensed. But, it is important to know that under the TBHEC, there is no longer a separate application for a Provisionally Licensed Psychologist, which is what I had completed and submitted pre-TBHEC. Once the license is issued, I would be considered a "Licensed Psychologist with Provisional Status," and I would imagine that I would merely have to submit documentation showing evidence that I have completed at least the minimum hours of supervised experiences (both internship and post doc). Hopefully the next steps will indicate where I can submit said information as well as the timeline I have for doing so.
                          Also, did you take any PEPPP or PEPPPO to prepare the EPPP?
                           
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                          cem22

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                          Dec 14, 2016
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                          1
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                            madpsych78

                            Full Member
                            7+ Year Member
                            Aug 16, 2011
                            61
                            29
                            1. Psychology Student
                              I didn't take PEPPP or PEPPPO to prepare for the EPPP. I think the benefit for taking the PEPPP in particular may be for getting a sense of the testing environment.

                              As far as studying for the EPPP goes, I will admit that the pandemic really helped me to make sure I put in the hours, as my other post doc duties took a dip temporarily. If there was one thing I could have done differently with Psych Prep, it would have been to also purchase the audio as I think that would have been a nice supplement to the reading materials and the practice tests. But I believe that the practice tests were immensely helpful.

                              I think that Psych Prep did a good job at covering the content areas that are on the EPPP, but it is important to note that you're not going to know absolutely everything on the EPPP. There will always be some items that will seem new. Thus, it is really important to know and learn how to approach multiple-choice items. Language is important, and if you can eliminate some of the answer choices, then your chances of identifying the correct answer goes up.
                               

                              Siyu

                              Full Member
                              Aug 9, 2019
                              21
                              3
                              1. Pre-Psychology
                                I am working on the Texas Jurisprudence Test now. I have made two attempts now, and both failed at 85%. It is harder than I thought it was. What are the strategies to pass it? I don't want to spend extra money on it anymore.
                                 

                                Brody_Busker

                                New Member
                                Nov 15, 2020
                                1
                                0
                                1. Non-Student
                                  I am working on the Texas Jurisprudence Test now. I have made two attempts now, and both failed at 85%. It is harder than I thought it was. What are the strategies to pass it? I don't want to spend extra money on it anymore.

                                  Honestly, I think it's pure luck. I've made 4 attempts and always failed between 84-89%, I'm going for the LPA. I've studied any and all relevant laws they claim you should and still the same result. Their "analysis", that they charge $50 for, is a complete joke as it's just an email telling you how many questions you missed under what areas. In my second to last attempt, I missed 23 out of 108 (without the demographic items) and STILL failed with an 85. It's LSSP heavy, which makes no sense because each exam is made out to seem as though it's tailored to that specific license (LPA, LSSP, etc). Why are they asking me questions about licenses that are irrelevant to my objective? Their code is convoluted and contradictory, you can't even find relevant information in the code with some of the questions so you have to google them. For a state that's pretty crooked in most things, they sure are a stickler for ethics.

                                  The strategy is basically the same as it is with the EPPP: picking the best wrong answer and hope for the best.
                                   

                                  L.A.PSYD

                                  New Member
                                  2+ Year Member
                                  Mar 17, 2018
                                  3
                                  0
                                  1. Post Doc
                                    Hi,
                                    Thanks for the info. I'm also in the process of applyng for TX licensure (currently lic. in IL). I found the PLUS/ASPPB & TSBEP guidelines for application confusing (daunting as well). Paid multiple fees & submitted applications/uploaded materials for both. One instruction states submit PLUS/ASPPB info before application to board, another states TSBE will contact ASPPB about my application and a "specialist"' will be assigned? I completed via certified mail and over one week have yet to receive confirmation. Delays due to COVID? Also, someone mentioned the Oral Exam and sunset law/COVID, which I'm having trouble getting clarification on. Didn't see anything about oral exam in my prep materials. It appears there are not study materials. We're to simply reference or study state bylaws etc. Finally, I'm wondering if we should be aware of any updates with telehealth/COVID that may not be reflected in current materials, but we will be expected to know? Sorry for long post. Thanks in advance.
                                    Hi there! As mentioned, I am in a similar boat; transferring my psych license from CA to TX. I finally had my PLUS application confirmed and completed by the ASPPB rep. after waiting months for CA to finally send over licensure verification. Then, PLUS sent me an email, copying TSBEP, indicating I can take the Jurisprudence and then apply for licensure though TSBEP. I am just curious if you had to resubmit all of the docs again to TSBEP, like your transcripts, EPPP scores. I thought that was why I paid for ASPPB for their services? So they could streamline these docs to TSBEP? I am concerned since it took so long for the transcripts and other docs to be sent originally that this will just further delay the process. I have yet to hear back from TSBEP after sending them a pretty extensive email with my inquiries, and it seems like things are really backed up over there with COVID and upcoming holidays. More importantly, I am not even sure what application I need to submit. Would it be the License Issuance (LP license), Request for OR Licensed Psychologist, Application for? Seems like the Licensed Psych Application is a bit redundant to everything that I had submitted to PLUS yet the License Issuance also has some of the same documents that I completed. Any help on this matter would be more than appreciated! Big Thanks in advance.
                                     

                                    MAGWOOD

                                    New Member
                                    Jun 26, 2021
                                    1
                                    0
                                      I'm shocked a thread on the Texas Jurisprudence Exam doesn't exist. Did I just miss it? Although the pressure is greatly reduced compared to the EPPP, before I went to take the Jurisprudence Exam, I felt like I wanted some input/advice from others who had taken it. I hope this post is helpful to anyone else in search of tips for the Texas Jurisprudence Exam:

                                      WARNING (and my main motivator for posting this): on your final question the button that you previously used to save your answer to each question becomes the "submit exam" button. I hit it thinking I was saving my answer to #118 and instead I submitted my entire exam!! No warning box, no color change of the button, nothing...my exam was submitted and locked. Yikes!! I had made note of 5 questions that I wanted to go back and review (hunt longer for the word-for-word answer), but I couldn't! I panicked, clicked back a hundred times, yelped at the thought of having to pay for it again if I failed, and then got an email saying I'd passed. Phew. In the end, I didn't waste any more time hunting for info to confirm those answers, but submitting unintentionally is never ideal. Be warned! It's not a highly sophisticated platform so you can't navigate between questions easily and the submission button is sneaky on that last question!

                                      Other helpful info:
                                      1)The Jurisprudence Exam for licensing as a Psychologist is different than the Texas Medical Jurisprudence Exam. It may sound like a silly distinction to point out, but it was news to me when I figured it out.

                                      2) The exam is untimed (2 week completion window starting the day you register), you can take it over multiple sittings, it's 100+ questions (my version was 118) that include some demographic questions and experimental, non-scored items. 90% is the minimum passing score.

                                      3) Preparation method: none - except locating the various reference materials. I pulled up the Texas Adminstrative Code Title 22, Part 21 (Texas Board of Examiners of Psychologists) and the PDF of TSBEP Acts and Rules. I used cntrl/find, Google search, and scanning to locate keywords and answers.

                                      In my experience about 25% I could answer without using any references, 50% I used the reference materials to confirm my best guess, 25% of the questions I could narrow it down to a few good answers but had to really hunt to confirm the answer in the reference materials.

                                      I took the exam in about 5 hours over multiple sittings and passed with 94%.

                                      Good luck! Hope this helps and you've got this!
                                      any other tips. I could not find several questions and I found a lot of the material in what you suggested but still did not get a 90. I went over the exam twice before submitting.
                                       

                                      psycat708

                                      New Member
                                      Feb 5, 2021
                                      8
                                      0
                                      1. Psychology Student
                                        I took the TX jurisprudence a few years ago for my LSSP license (same test for all licenses under TSBEP as far as I know). I definitely agree with the previous advice about having all of the resources up and ready and using Ctrl F. I'll add that it's important to keep in mind that the test is looking for the legal answer, not the best practice answer. I know a few people who were tripped up because they answered based on what they would actually do (which may be above and beyond the law), not what the law specifically requires. Also, I found it helpful to use the full two weeks and so that I could review my answers on different days and with a fresh head. That may be a personal preference. Good luck and hang in there! It's a tough one, you're not alone!
                                         
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