The World is Flat!

Discussion in 'Med Business [ MD/MBA, DO/MBA, DDS/MBA ]' started by Andrew_Doan, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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    This is an AWESOME book and explains where business is going in the 21st Century. Hop on the train or get left behind! ;)

    The Internet is changing our world quickly. For instance, you and I are discussing business via the Internet. We've never met, but we are helping others brainstorm for ideas in this forum.

    If you haven't read this book, then I suggest you read it. It's AWESOME and this is where business is heading in the next Century.

    The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century by Thomas L. Friedman

    Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com
    Thomas L. Friedman is not so much a futurist, which he is sometimes called, as a presentist. His aim, in his new book, The World Is Flat, as in his earlier, influential Lexus and the Olive Tree, is not to give you a speculative preview of the wonders that are sure to come in your lifetime, but rather to get you caught up on the wonders that are already here. The world isn't going to be flat, it is flat, which gives Friedman's breathless narrative much of its urgency, and which also saves it from the Epcot-style polyester sheen that futurists--the optimistic ones at least--are inevitably prey to.

    What Friedman means by "flat" is "connected": the lowering of trade and political barriers and the exponential technical advances of the digital revolution have made it possible to do business, or almost anything else, instantaneously with billions of other people across the planet. This in itself should not be news to anyone. But the news that Friedman has to deliver is that just when we stopped paying attention to these developments--when the dot-com bust turned interest away from the business and technology pages and when 9/11 and the Iraq War turned all eyes toward the Middle East--is when they actually began to accelerate. Globalization 3.0, as he calls it, is driven not by major corporations or giant trade organizations like the World Bank, but by individuals: desktop freelancers and innovative startups all over the world (but especially in India and China) who can compete--and win--not just for low-wage manufacturing and information labor but, increasingly, for the highest-end research and design work as well. (He doesn't forget the "mutant supply chains" like Al-Qaeda that let the small act big in more destructive ways.) Friedman tells his eye-opening story with the catchy slogans and globe-hopping anecdotes that readers of his earlier books and his New York Times columns will know well, and also with a stern sort of optimism. He wants to tell you how exciting this new world is, but he also wants you to know you're going to be trampled if you don't keep up with it. His book is an excellent place to begin. --Tom Nissley

    Where Were You When the World Went Flat?


    Thomas L. Friedman's reporter's curiosity and his ability to recognize the patterns behind the most complex global developments have made him one of the most entertaining and authoritative sources for information about the wider world we live in, both as the foreign affairs columnist for the New York Times and as the author of landmark books like From Beirut to Jerusalem and The Lexus and the Olive Tree. They also make him an endlessly fascinating conversation partner, and we'd happily have peppered him with questions about The World Is Flat for hours. Read our interview to learn why there's almost no one from Washington, D.C., listed in the index of a book about the global economy, and what his one-plank platform for president would be. (Hint: his bumper stickers would say, "Can You Hear Me Now?")
    http://store.medrounds.org/shop.php?mode=Books&item=0374292884

    I got the book via Audible.com, and I LOVE IT!
     
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  2. Shredder

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    hey, im an audible user too, pretty cool. i love it, always finish my 2 books well before the renewal date. anyway if any of you sign up for it, put me as a referral, ill pay you! me and dr. doan can compete for your referral heheh. i too listened to The World is Flat months ago, it was a good and informative listen. its the only review i wrote on amazon that has 5/5 useful votes, im so proud.

    i think the medical tourism industry is a great example of a flattening world. i dont believe he touched on that at all, but i wonder if there are any books out there on it. lots of talk about india and china, definitely up and coming economies. i also listened to a book called China, Inc. that talked about china. friedman once wrote an analogy relating their economies to freeways...i cant find the exact quote but it was something like "indias capitalist freeway is bumpy right now (corruption, reforms, population) but in the distance it looks like it might be clear, and chinas freeway is big and broad right now but there is a bump looming in the distance (communisms future) that the car may or may not get past". incidentally, i think the books title is misleading, as i originally thought it was a history book and didnt take interest until i read reviews and looked past the cover, and saw it on the bestseller list. books are tempting to judge by covers, thats what marketing is all about

    say, hows myfundrazor doing in colleges? anybody i can talk to who has been successful in that realm?
     
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  3. MStewart

    MStewart Pre-Med
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    Actually Friedman is not quite right...The world is not quite flat. There are three big mountains (US, India, China), a lot of small hills (Japan, Saudi Arabia, England, Germany) and some ant hills. Only China, India, and the US have the manpower and education to maintain their status. But there are many climbers.

    If anything, globalization will decrease. As entrepenuership spreads, we'll see companies become more isolated within their own countries' markets.
     
  4. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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  5. Energon

    Energon Nobody Summons Megatron
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    This is a great book and I particularly like Tom Friedman. Yes, right now there are three big mountains, but it does not mean that this is some sort of a closed society; anyone can join in and that is the beauty of the flat world.
     
  6. Shredder

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    ive been reading some pat buchanan and hes against free trade. he advocates tariffs to generate maximum revenue, then commensurate reduction of domestic taxes. that way it seems to even out the dollars we pay overall, while at the same time fostering domestic workers and industries. its kind of convincing, the protectionist argument. ill see if i can find a decent link on it sometime. protectionism has been given a bad name at even the slightest mention of it, but apparently it has some merit. free trade sounds flowery in theory, but americans are losing jobs, the dollar is losing value, and foreigners are buying up our country--real estate, securities, bonds, companies. also it makes us more dependent on other countries, although they too are dependent on us. does america need to change course to avoid a 21st century that is dominated by china? global interdependence is something that hasnt happened historically...i guess thats the gist of friedmans book. but are there two sides to this issue?

    ha this is another audible book where i got this from--Where the Right Went Wrong
     
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