Tissue Donation

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by 2003, May 5, 1999.

  1. 2003

    2003 Senior Member

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    I am curious about everyone's opinion of tissue donation (skin, bone, eyes, heart valves, and saphenous veins). I know many people who are willing to donate organs but not tissues. I personally say that if I die I hope every useable little bit of me is taken to help the living.
     
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  3. VM

    VM Senior Member

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    2003, I would also donate my tissues, I don't see why some people would donate their organs and not these other tissues. On a side note, would you donate your body to be a cadaver? I wouldn't.

    [This message has been edited by VM (edited May 06, 1999).]
     
  4. edgar

    edgar Senior Member

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    Guys,

    I'd donate my organs and tissues, but would also nix the idea of being a cadaver.

    EDGAR
     
  5. OldManDave

    OldManDave Fossil Bouncer Emeritus
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    My wife and I have an agreement...anything they want, they can have. As for being a cadaver for some med student to prod around in....I dunno, I'll have to ponder on that one a while.

    ------------------
    'Old Man Dave'
    KCOM, Class of '03
     
  6. ReneeWB

    ReneeWB Senior Member

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    Just curious about why previous posters said they wouldn't want to be a donated cadaver. I am listed as an organ/tissue donor and don't personally have a problem with being donated as a cadaver. Perhaps I haven't thought about all the negatives. Enlighten me, please. [​IMG]

    Renee
     
  7. NickCVM

    NickCVM Senior Member

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    I was wondering if the people who give their bodies to science new that their biological rests would be used for dissection in med schools around the country? I assume that most of them do - maybe some are volunteered from the morgues (homeless people who have no family.. hmm). [​IMG] what an exciting subject to talk about..
    --Nicolas--
    WesternU'03

    PS: I'm a donor - all usable organs/tissues.
    I encourage everybody to have their donor card with them at ALL times.
     
  8. OldManDave

    OldManDave Fossil Bouncer Emeritus
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    Having had extensive exposure to transplantations/organ harvest services through my 9 years caring for critically ill children is the impetus behind my desire to donate any tissues/organs they desire. I would rather help the immediately living to survive.

    On the other hand, it would seem at least an equivalent investment to allow a med student to learn from 'hacking' me up. Thinking of it in that context yields new empathy for my rat subjects who participated in my senior research project.

    If they could find no need for my parts [transplantation...], it would be OK with me to become a med cadaver. Although, I would certainly prefer them to harvest me. To be honest, I'm dead...I'm obviously thru with my body...they can do what they wish with it.

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    'Old Man Dave'
    KCOM, Class of '03


    [This message has been edited by OldManDave (edited May 08, 1999).]
     
  9. sean

    sean Senior Member

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    I'm all for tissue donation; please use what is left after I am gone. The cadaver topic is interesting. Working with cadavers should be a sobering moment for all med students. I think it is appropriate to recognize that the cadaver you are working on was once a living human being. A sense of respect should always be shown to anyone who thought a student worthy of the opportunity to learn that the donated their body as a cadaver. I have had various exeriences with cadavers and invariably there are a few people who joke around with their subject. THERE IS NO NEED TO GIVE A CADAVER A PET NAME. It is our responsibility to make sure that this kind of disrespect never happens, so that possible future donors will not feel that their remains may be desecrated. If those who will benefit most, (ie us), are reluctant to become cadavers for future med students, how can we expect others to do so for us. A silent word of thanks to the person who thought highly enough of our chosen profession to donate their earthly remains would be an appropriate gesture. I will now get off my soap box and turn over the floor for comment.
     
  10. sean

    sean Senior Member

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    I'm all for tissue donation; please use what is left after I am gone. The cadaver topic is interesting. Working with cadavers should be a sobering moment for all med students. I think it is appropriate to recognize that the cadaver you are working on was once a living human being. A sense of respect should always be shown to anyone who thought a student worthy of the opportunity to learn that the donated their body as a cadaver. I have had various exeriences with cadavers and invariably there are a few people who joke around with their subject. THERE IS NO NEED TO GIVE A CADAVER A PET NAME. It is our responsibility to make sure that this kind of disrespect never happens, so that possible future donors will not feel that their remains may be desecrated. If those who will benefit most, (ie us), are reluctant to become cadavers for future med students, how can we expect others to do so for us. A silent word of thanks to the person who thought highly enough of our chosen profession to donate their earthly remains would be an appropriate gesture. I will now get off my soap box and turn over the floor for comment.
     
  11. OldManDave

    OldManDave Fossil Bouncer Emeritus
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    A point well made Sean

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    'Old Man Dave'
    KCOM, Class of '03
     
  12. VM

    VM Senior Member

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    I agree Sean. Just today, one of my doctor in-laws was joking about how they joked around about the cadavers in GA. I know its just for fun, but this kind of makes our point. My wife would not want my physical remains treated with this lack of dignity, and neither would I with hers. We should bear this in mind when we are in Gross Anatomy.
     
  13. mevannorden

    mevannorden Member

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    I guess I don't care what happens to my body after I'm gone. I'd rather be "harvested", so to speak, but if that's not possible, cadaver lab is fine. As far as recognizing that our subject was once a living human being, that's a bit difficult. If I looked at my cadaver as a person, I would have a terribly hard time cutting on him. I for one had to forget he was human so I could dissect. Of course, that by no means justifies treating the body with disrespect.
     

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