To send SLOE out or not?

Discussion in 'Emergency Medicine' started by Nilperosbutveg, Jan 11, 2017.

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  1. Nilperosbutveg

    Nilperosbutveg

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    I have only 1 SLOE as a part of my app. Despite this, I have received 16 or so interviews for EM. I've made the decision to only go on 11. I've gotten pretty great vibes from my interviewers thankfully (I think they like my scores, ECs, and I'm managing to not turn them off with my personality). My #1 told me they'd be lucky to have a resident like me and that I would be a great fit. Now I hope that didn't come off as bragging. I feel very blessed/lucky to be where I'm at, especially considering that I am just a lowly DO. I'm sharing this all so you better understand my situation.

    I recently received a 2nd SLOE just this past Monday. To play it safe, I sent this SLOE only to one program, a program I interviewed at on Tuesday. My mission was to find out whatever I could about the SLOE at my interview before sending it out to the rest of the programs I interviewed at.

    Unexpectedly, I didn't have to do any prying. The PD told me a little about it unsolicited. She said that overall it was a very positive SLOE. She said it stated I was enthusiastic for EM, had great differential diagnoses, got along with everyone and followed up on my patients very well. She did also divulge the only negative contents of the SLOE. I'm paraphrasing, but she said it stated that at times I could be timid, and that possibly I may lack confidence.

    SHOULD I SEND IT OUT? I know that's not such a huge negative comment, and that at least it's not saying I'm arrogant, but I feel like I will probably match at my #1 without it. I feel like it may just be an unnecessary risk to send it out. There is also the question of whether or not it will even make any difference this late in the game anyway. I've heard it could potentially alter my placement on a rank list though.

    I appreciate any help you can offer in resolving this dilemma of mine. So far I'm leaning towards not sending it out. Thanks for reading.
     
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  3. RustedFox

    RustedFox We're all stars now. In the GOAT RODEO. 7+ Year Member

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    Send it. Unless you're too timid.
     
    sally23, GTP, Lexdiamondz and 6 others like this.
  4. Nilperosbutveg

    Nilperosbutveg

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    Can you share why I should? Risk not really as big as maybe I'm making it out to be?
     
  5. racerwad

    racerwad 7+ Year Member

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    By being timid about sending an otherwise positive SLOE, you are only contributing to the assertion that you are timid.

    One of the hardest parts of EM is making decisions with limited info that others are going to judge through the retrospectroscope. It will help your longevity to develop some emotional resilience about things that are no longer in your control.
     
    Makati2008 likes this.
  6. Nilperosbutveg

    Nilperosbutveg

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    I am not a PD--I'm not sure how SLOE comments like that are perceived. Also, it is in my control whether to send it or not. I've come to SDN to gather some more info before making the decision. This isn't an ED or a resuscitation. I'm not really crunched for time. I'd rather you not try to teach me something but actually address the points I've brought up. Could you maybe speak to the risk that may be imaginary on my part, or perhaps speak to the effect a SLOE might have this late in the game?
     
  7. racerwad

    racerwad 7+ Year Member

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    The SLOE sounds positive. There isn't anything wrong with being timid/shy/introverted/scared ****less if you are able to make decisions when needed. That is what PDs are going to want to know when they review the SLOE and your app as a whole. Different programs have different cultures and expectations. If your dream program values people who are self-assured, then it might be seen as a negative. If your dream program values thoughtful, introspective people, then it would likely be seen as benign. In the end, you can't know how others are going to interpret it, you just have to decide what to do with the information given.

    The points you brought up in your OP that I am responding to: 1) were told in a formal eval you are have a lot of positive attributes and that you might lack confidence, 2) you lack the confidence to share said eval despite the positive feedback therein, 3) you came to SDN for external validation of a personal decision due to what I perceive as a lack of confidence. It is impossible to say if the risk is imaginary as we don't know where you interviewed at. As an example, if I knew you were interviewing at my program, I could tell you without a doubt what my PD would think of such a comment (fwiw - it would not be bad). Lacking that info, I gave you the best advice I could: share that hard-earned SLOE and its positive comments. Even this late in the season, ROLs are not necessarily set in stone and it would give you a good reason to reach out one last time to programs and provide one additional positive data point about why they should consider ranking you highly.
     
    Nilperosbutveg likes this.
  8. Nilperosbutveg

    Nilperosbutveg

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    Jan 11, 2017
    Ah, I hadn't thought about a lot of that. Thanks so much. Very helpful. I really appreciate it.
     
  9. racerwad

    racerwad 7+ Year Member

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    I know this is an anxiety provoking time and so is residency. It is much better to be someplace that values you for who you are even if that isn't your "dream" place. If the worst thing someone says about you is that you might be a little timid, that is pretty dang good. There appears to be a lot of empirical data based on the # of invites that suggest that you are quite desirable, so own it, or at least fake it until it feels real.

    Good luck.
     
  10. Nilperosbutveg

    Nilperosbutveg

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    Thank you again. I will keep that in mind.
     
  11. CliveStaples

    CliveStaples 5+ Year Member

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    Send it out. It's clearly mostly positive and it gives some insight into your personality - yes, it's possible that it can be construed as a negative, but remember that these are letters of EVALUATION, not RECOMMENDATION. Comments like the one you received are not going to stand out as a kiss of death.

    What may be the kiss of death is that many programs state that they need two SLOEs in order to have you application complete and ranked. Yes, you got interviews with just one, but it's entirely possible that not sending the second SLOE could keep you off of some rank lists.
     
    racerwad likes this.
  12. I've heard that programs can see you've done two EM rotations and actually expect a SLOE from each, so not sending one in makes it look like you are hiding something. I think that would be much worse than even a neutral SLOE.
     
  13. doggydog

    doggydog Woof.

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    They can't magically see anything. They know if you didn't submit a second SLOE if one of your SLOEs says it's your third rotation and you only have two SLOEs. They have no clue if you don't submit your last rotation's SLOE
     
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  14. Wouldn't they see two EM rotations on the transcript, and want to see two corresponding SLOEs? Not challenging you here, maybe my source on this is off?
     
  15. doggydog

    doggydog Woof.

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    If that's what it says on your transcript. My transcript says nothing about a second or third away rotation.
     
  16. Interesting, is that because your 2nd and 3rd away rotations were after you submitted ERAS? I think for the OP this is his first away and as someone mentioned there are programs that require 2 SLOEs.

    and wow, 4 EM rotations? I hope that does not become the new standard
     
  17. doggydog

    doggydog Woof.

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    It's just listed as a special project or something. Same as my research month.

    Haha no, I meant rotation. I did three.
     
    Willfrye027 likes this.
  18. tux4

    tux4

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    Many DO students are using every elective rotation to do EM rotations. So some people are doing like 6 subi's just to get the interviews at those places with a minimum 3 though.


    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile app
     
    SpacemanSpifff likes this.
  19. SpacemanSpifff

    SpacemanSpifff 5+ Year Member

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    Met an applicant on the trail who did 6 sub-i's. Woof.
     
  20. jessk2015

    jessk2015

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    Not to hijack the thread, but is there a way to find out which programs require 2 SLOES to rank? I'll only have 1 SLOE (will not be assigning my second because it was no bueno).
     
  21. CliveStaples

    CliveStaples 5+ Year Member

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    You're going to be best off going to the websites of every program you've interviewed at and see their page on information for applicants - this states their LOR requirement.

    Don't be surprised if many places say that they require 2 SLOEs and don't be afraid to assign them that second letter, even if you're not confident in it. You don't want to make yourself totally ineligible for being ranked just because you don't want to hurt your competitiveness. Many people have lackluster SLOEs and programs recognize that even people at or below average are very rankable and competitive applicants.
     
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