Torn in my Decision: NYCPM vs. TouroCom MBS linkage Versus Stonybrook MBS

MedKid8399

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Just accepted to TOUROCOM linkage program which links to its Osteopath school, as well as Stonybrook Masters of biomedical sciences, and NYCPM. I have several years of research experiences at NYU Winthrop, 3 publications, many hours shadowing doctors, volunteer experiences, and a year scribing with an orthopedic surgeon. I went to Tufts University. My GPA took an upward trend at Tufts University, and finished with 3.1 science and 3.3 cumulative GPA (I know, very mediocre, which is why an MBS would help me out). My last 4 semesters at Tufts, I received honors with 3.6 GPA. But this is because i got my **** together, did not have baseball anymore, went out less, and started studying with he right group of people. I even pulled off an A in Orgo once I knew what I was doing. I got my priorities together and started studying for tests way ahead of time.

I I know that Stonybrook on its own would be an MBS, while Touro offers a linkage into its DO given I achieve a 3.4 GPA in the masters, and then I am already accepted into NYCPM in which I would just start right away in Harlem this fall.

I want to preface by saying that, I understand I must choose the field that would make me happy and best match my skillset. However, I have come to crossroads in which I have been accepted into all 3 of these programs and I am unsure in which way to proceed. It's best to listen to my gut, but I have some mentors telling me one thing while others say to go to the other school. I shadowed a hematologist, pediatrician, and scribed with an orthopedic surgeon for an entire year. I enjoy interacting with patients, but also highly enjoy hands-on procedures and technology.

I believe I would enjoy the hands-on and bio-mechanical aspect of being a podiatrist, with the opportunity to perform surgery and join a private practice or a hospital. I'd say about 2 of 4 podiatrists I spoke with mentioned that unless you are 100% on narrowing down your field to foot and ankle, apply to DO or Med school. However, they said they enjoyed their careers and wouldn’t have changed it if they could go back. I know that there would be specialties I would enjoy in med school too, such as PM and R, family medicine, sports medicine...

Finances:
I don't like to make decisions just based on finances, but NYCPM would cost about 150,000, and TOUROCOM plus the masters would be about 400,000 +
Stonybrook is a state school and the price would be fantastic.
I'd take out loans to help with payments, and parents may help to cover half of the expenses. Hopefully, by either working in family medicine or by living frugally, it would not be a problem paying this off.

Hours per week:
I have heard from some that podiatry can offer a nice work-life balance, although I assume hours would be longer with more surgeries performed, especially in a busy orthopedic practice. Furthermore, I have heard being a physician overall means being accepting of potentially long hours. Is anyone able to speak on this?


TLDR:
Should I go to NYCPM this fall in Harlem, go to a Stonybrook program and use the masters to enter MD/DO school, or go to the TOUROCOM linkage program, which guarantees acceptance with 3.4 GPA. And can anyone speak on surgical privileges of podiatrists, as well as starting salary as a surgeon once podiatry residency is complete? What made you choose podiatry over MD/DO school? Thanks for any input on this.
 
D

deleted1003403

This is such a big life decision it’ll be hard to get an answer on a forum. I don’t know much about the other programs. As far as pod salary it’s all over the place. Most residents seem to get screwed right out of residency making $100-$120k or so. But the field is what you make of it. And some pods are killing it. If you don’t know for sure I’d take another year off. Don’t rush this decision
 
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DexterMorganSK

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Just accepted to TOUROCOM linkage program which links to its Osteopath school, as well as Stonybrook Masters of biomedical sciences, and NYCPM. I have several years of research experiences at NYU Winthrop, 3 publications, many hours shadowing doctors, volunteer experiences, and a year scribing with an orthopedic surgeon. I went to Tufts University. My GPA took an upward trend at Tufts University, and finished with 3.1 science and 3.3 cumulative GPA (I know, very mediocre, which is why an MBS would help me out). My last 4 semesters at Tufts, I received honors with 3.6 GPA. But this is because i got my **** together, did not have baseball anymore, went out less, and started studying with he right group of people. I even pulled off an A in Orgo once I knew what I was doing. I got my priorities together and started studying for tests way ahead of time.

I I know that Stonybrook on its own would be an MBS, while Touro offers a linkage into its DO given I achieve a 3.4 GPA in the masters, and then I am already accepted into NYCPM in which I would just start right away in Harlem this fall.

I want to preface by saying that, I understand I must choose the field that would make me happy and best match my skillset. However, I have come to crossroads in which I have been accepted into all 3 of these programs and I am unsure in which way to proceed. It's best to listen to my gut, but I have some mentors telling me one thing while others say to go to the other school. I shadowed a hematologist, pediatrician, and scribed with an orthopedic surgeon for an entire year. I enjoy interacting with patients, but also highly enjoy hands-on procedures and technology.

I believe I would enjoy the hands-on and bio-mechanical aspect of being a podiatrist, with the opportunity to perform surgery and join a private practice or a hospital. I'd say about 2 of 4 podiatrists I spoke with mentioned that unless you are 100% on narrowing down your field to foot and ankle, apply to DO or Med school. However, they said they enjoyed their careers and wouldn’t have changed it if they could go back. I know that there would be specialties I would enjoy in med school too, such as PM and R, family medicine, sports medicine...

Finances:
I don't like to make decisions just based on finances, but NYCPM would cost about 150,000, and TOUROCOM plus the masters would be about 400,000 +
Stonybrook is a state school and the price would be fantastic.
I'd take out loans to help with payments, and parents may help to cover half of the expenses. Hopefully, by either working in family medicine or by living frugally, it would not be a problem paying this off.

Hours per week:
I have heard from some that podiatry can offer a nice work-life balance, although I assume hours would be longer with more surgeries performed, especially in a busy orthopedic practice. Furthermore, I have heard being a physician overall means being accepting of potentially long hours. Is anyone able to speak on this?


TLDR:
Should I go to NYCPM this fall in Harlem, go to a Stonybrook program and use the masters to enter MD/DO school, or go to the TOUROCOM linkage program, which guarantees acceptance with 3.4 GPA. And can anyone speak on surgical privileges of podiatrists, as well as starting salary as a surgeon once podiatry residency is complete? What made you choose podiatry over MD/DO school? Thanks for any input on this.

Since the residency is surgical, you are expected to incorporate it into your work. Many decide surgery is not for them or are not good at it so they only do the medicinal aspect of Podiatry (and do fine financially).

We just had a salary-related thread so you can read that here: Salary

I personally think you shouldn't jump on NYCPM just because they took you in, instead, maybe defer your acceptance, take the MCAT and see things go from there.
As you may read around here, classes at pod programs are all virtual at this point so that will follow into the fall, another reason to not start right away.
NYCPM is owned by Touro College now but I wouldn't recommend doing the Touro's masters program because of their high tuition and lower acceptance stats into the DO program. If you want to become a DO then at least apply to an MBS that is affiliated with the DO school and grants admissions/interviews with a higher % rate like that of VCOM.

Podiatry is a great and diverse field that opens many doors and while getting in is easier, making out from the program is another story. And because you will be taking many standardized exams in the future in either profession, I highly suggest taking the MCAT first.
 
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PTPuser

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OK, YMMV so please take this with a grain of salt, it's internet.

So... I did a "linkage" master like the ones you mentioned above. They had a ridiculous GPA requirement much higher than what you listed and to make the story short, I didn't meet the requirement probably due to my own merit and the fact that it was meant to weed out.

I'll be starting Pod school this fall and I am more than grateful for the opportunity and I think most of the incoming students like myself feel that way because this is another chance for us to be physician and practice medicine and surgery.

So...should you take that plunge? That's entirely up to you...

I was not in the same cross road as you were but if I was in this position, what I would ask myself is can I be happy as a podiatrist?

Because right now, you have a guarantee acceptance. You go to NYCPM, you're going to be a doctor. No questions asked, no headache in the admission process to get into school.

Now, if you go to the Master program, you might kill it or you might sink...You kill it and you're going to be MD/DO. You sink, and now it might affect your GPA even more and risking showing school a downward trend.

Is that something you're willing to risk?
 
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MedKid8399

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Since the residency is surgical, you are expected to incorporate it into your work. Many decide surgery is not for them or are not good at it so they only do the medicinal aspect of Podiatry (and do fine financially).

We just had a salary-related thread so you can read that here: Salary

I personally think you shouldn't jump on NYCPM just because they took you in, instead, maybe defer your acceptance, take the MCAT and see things go from there.
As you may read around here, classes at pod programs are all virtual at this point so that will follow into the fall, another reason to not start right away.
NYCPM is owned by Touro College now but I wouldn't recommend doing the Touro's masters program because of their high tuition and lower acceptance stats into the DO program. If you want to become a DO then at least apply to an MBS that is affiliated with the DO school and grants admissions/interviews with a higher % rate like that of VCOM.

Podiatry is a great and diverse field that opens many doors and while getting in is easier, making out from the program is another story. And because you will be taking many standardized exams in the future in either profession, I highly suggest taking the MCAT first.

Thank you. I’m very new so was unaware of the cross posting. I won’t do it in the future.
 
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zNoodlez

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Just accepted to TOUROCOM linkage program which links to its Osteopath school, as well as Stonybrook Masters of biomedical sciences, and NYCPM. I have several years of research experiences at NYU Winthrop, 3 publications, many hours shadowing doctors, volunteer experiences, and a year scribing with an orthopedic surgeon. I went to Tufts University. My GPA took an upward trend at Tufts University, and finished with 3.1 science and 3.3 cumulative GPA (I know, very mediocre, which is why an MBS would help me out). My last 4 semesters at Tufts, I received honors with 3.6 GPA. But this is because i got my **** together, did not have baseball anymore, went out less, and started studying with he right group of people. I even pulled off an A in Orgo once I knew what I was doing. I got my priorities together and started studying for tests way ahead of time.

I I know that Stonybrook on its own would be an MBS, while Touro offers a linkage into its DO given I achieve a 3.4 GPA in the masters, and then I am already accepted into NYCPM in which I would just start right away in Harlem this fall.

I want to preface by saying that, I understand I must choose the field that would make me happy and best match my skillset. However, I have come to crossroads in which I have been accepted into all 3 of these programs and I am unsure in which way to proceed. It's best to listen to my gut, but I have some mentors telling me one thing while others say to go to the other school. I shadowed a hematologist, pediatrician, and scribed with an orthopedic surgeon for an entire year. I enjoy interacting with patients, but also highly enjoy hands-on procedures and technology.

I believe I would enjoy the hands-on and bio-mechanical aspect of being a podiatrist, with the opportunity to perform surgery and join a private practice or a hospital. I'd say about 2 of 4 podiatrists I spoke with mentioned that unless you are 100% on narrowing down your field to foot and ankle, apply to DO or Med school. However, they said they enjoyed their careers and wouldn’t have changed it if they could go back. I know that there would be specialties I would enjoy in med school too, such as PM and R, family medicine, sports medicine...

Finances:
I don't like to make decisions just based on finances, but NYCPM would cost about 150,000, and TOUROCOM plus the masters would be about 400,000 +
Stonybrook is a state school and the price would be fantastic.
I'd take out loans to help with payments, and parents may help to cover half of the expenses. Hopefully, by either working in family medicine or by living frugally, it would not be a problem paying this off.

Hours per week:
I have heard from some that podiatry can offer a nice work-life balance, although I assume hours would be longer with more surgeries performed, especially in a busy orthopedic practice. Furthermore, I have heard being a physician overall means being accepting of potentially long hours. Is anyone able to speak on this?


TLDR:
Should I go to NYCPM this fall in Harlem, go to a Stonybrook program and use the masters to enter MD/DO school, or go to the TOUROCOM linkage program, which guarantees acceptance with 3.4 GPA. And can anyone speak on surgical privileges of podiatrists, as well as starting salary as a surgeon once podiatry residency is complete? What made you choose podiatry over MD/DO school? Thanks for any input on this.
Have you taken the MCAT yet?
 
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DexterMorganSK

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Now, if you go to the Master program, you might kill it or you might sink...You kill it and you're going to be MD/DO. You sink, and now it might affect your GPA even more and risking showing school a downward trend.

Is that something you're willing to risk?

That's a great point. Those that make it out from the SMPs do well, but those who do not are closing all the doors.
 
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PTPuser

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That's a great point. Those that make it out from the SMPs do well, but those who do not are closing all the doors.

I did ok in my SMP, but it showed a downward trend. It came up on all my interview. I was pretty certain that I wasn't gonna make it in anywhere cause I had a decent undergrad GPA but lower SMP GPA.

I don't regret going to the SMP cause it was what I wanted at the time. I can't blame anyone but myself. But I wish I took the advice of SDN when they say that SMP are not meant to be a saving grace. It is baptism by fire and there is no support but yourself. They're not in the business to make sure everyone get into their school.

Had I know what I know now, I would've saved myself $50K and go for podiatry.

OP, I saw your other thread. You didn't take the MCAT yet. YOU NEED TO TAKE THE MCAT. All of the recommendation from everyone so far means nothing without an MCAT. You might not even need any of this stress if you have the MCAT.
 
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de Ribas

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I would take MCAT first. If you have high MCAT, I don't see why you can't apply straight to DO or even DPM programs without SMP.

I think average GPA for DO schools is still like 3.4. It means there are a ton of accepted people with less than 3.4. There are documents showing breakdown of GPAs and MCAT scores for DO applicants and matriculants. I think 3.1 sGPA and 3.3 cGPA is good enough for at least half of DO schools, provided you will have above average MCAT. You won't be able to be selective, but you will get interviews.

So, you have to take MCAT first. I don't see a reason to go to SMP without MCAT. Even if you do well in SMP and won't clear 498-500 for MCAT, you wasted that money and time for SMP.

The way I understand it, SMP works for students who have exhausted undergrad options to raise GPA just by taking additional classes. Doing very well in SMP, kinda overrides their overall undergrad GPA to some extent. So, if one has 3.3 GPA and has taken many courses already, taking additional courses won't do much to their overall GPA. Doing SMP that resembles medical school curriculum and load and getting like 3.7, shows you can handle the load and redirects attention from your low uGPA. It does not replace low MCAT score. 3.7 GPA at SMP will not replace 495 score or lower. Keep that in mind. So I would first see your MCAT potential, before committing to SMP.
 
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DexterMorganSK

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Is that tuition or full cost of attendance? TOUROCOM's 400k cost is ridiculous. I never knew a program could cost so much! Sheesh...

It might be a bit less but that range is very typical of dental programs like NYU dental is close to 100K per year. :eek:
 
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call1800doctorb

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Just accepted to TOUROCOM linkage program which links to its Osteopath school, as well as Stonybrook Masters of biomedical sciences, and NYCPM. I have several years of research experiences at NYU Winthrop, 3 publications, many hours shadowing doctors, volunteer experiences, and a year scribing with an orthopedic surgeon. I went to Tufts University. My GPA took an upward trend at Tufts University, and finished with 3.1 science and 3.3 cumulative GPA (I know, very mediocre, which is why an MBS would help me out). My last 4 semesters at Tufts, I received honors with 3.6 GPA. But this is because i got my **** together, did not have baseball anymore, went out less, and started studying with he right group of people. I even pulled off an A in Orgo once I knew what I was doing. I got my priorities together and started studying for tests way ahead of time.

I I know that Stonybrook on its own would be an MBS, while Touro offers a linkage into its DO given I achieve a 3.4 GPA in the masters, and then I am already accepted into NYCPM in which I would just start right away in Harlem this fall.

I want to preface by saying that, I understand I must choose the field that would make me happy and best match my skillset. However, I have come to crossroads in which I have been accepted into all 3 of these programs and I am unsure in which way to proceed. It's best to listen to my gut, but I have some mentors telling me one thing while others say to go to the other school. I shadowed a hematologist, pediatrician, and scribed with an orthopedic surgeon for an entire year. I enjoy interacting with patients, but also highly enjoy hands-on procedures and technology.

I believe I would enjoy the hands-on and bio-mechanical aspect of being a podiatrist, with the opportunity to perform surgery and join a private practice or a hospital. I'd say about 2 of 4 podiatrists I spoke with mentioned that unless you are 100% on narrowing down your field to foot and ankle, apply to DO or Med school. However, they said they enjoyed their careers and wouldn’t have changed it if they could go back. I know that there would be specialties I would enjoy in med school too, such as PM and R, family medicine, sports medicine...

Finances:
I don't like to make decisions just based on finances, but NYCPM would cost about 150,000, and TOUROCOM plus the masters would be about 400,000 +
Stonybrook is a state school and the price would be fantastic.
I'd take out loans to help with payments, and parents may help to cover half of the expenses. Hopefully, by either working in family medicine or by living frugally, it would not be a problem paying this off.

Hours per week:
I have heard from some that podiatry can offer a nice work-life balance, although I assume hours would be longer with more surgeries performed, especially in a busy orthopedic practice. Furthermore, I have heard being a physician overall means being accepting of potentially long hours. Is anyone able to speak on this?


TLDR:
Should I go to NYCPM this fall in Harlem, go to a Stonybrook program and use the masters to enter MD/DO school, or go to the TOUROCOM linkage program, which guarantees acceptance with 3.4 GPA. And can anyone speak on surgical privileges of podiatrists, as well as starting salary as a surgeon once podiatry residency is complete? What made you choose podiatry over MD/DO school? Thanks for any input on this.

A good MCAT will increase your options. Take the MCAT and study hard for it. Podiatry is a great field and I’m happy but it’s not the same as being an MD/DO. Also keep the amount of debt you will take on in mind. It’s important to keep your debt low.
 

tiger1409

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I wouldn't do Touro masters for reasons described above. Every year, there are few students at NYCPM who come from Touro MBS because they didn't get in DO there. From what they (who are very bright students) tell me, it's extremely difficult because they only take a certain number of students from masters and everyone wants in. These kinds of programs are total money grab imo
 
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Reverdin green

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I am in the best position to answer this as I did Touro’s masters and currently 3rd year at NYCPM
I got into the DO program but I discovered Podiatry during the program and chose it over DO.
Now for the masters, it is graded based on standard deviation. If the average is 80 and standard deviation is 15 then 95+ is A and 85 to 94 A-. So basically you always have to score above average and standard deviation to get an A. There was one exam you literally needed 99 or 100 to get an A. You take same classes and exams as the DO students.
I wanted surgery and I realized as a DO it would be an uphill battle so I grabbed DPM and ran with it. I wish u all the best in your decision.
 
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PTPuser

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I am in the best position to answer this as I did Touro’s masters and currently 3rd year at NYCPM
I got into the DO program but I discovered Podiatry during the program and chose it over DO.
Now for the masters, it is graded based on standard deviation. If the average is 80 and standard deviation is 15 then 95+ is A and 85 to 94 A-. So basically you always have to score above average and standard deviation to get an A. There was one exam you literally needed 99 or 100 to get an A. You take same classes and exams as the DO students.
I wanted surgery and I realized as a DO it would be an uphill battle so I grabbed DPM and ran with it. I wish u all the best in your decision.

That's insane. My SMP anything 90 and up is 4.0
 

xoxo111

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NYCPM P2 here: We have a few people from the Touro Master's Program in my class. As far as I have heard, you also need a minimum MCAT score? Someone, please correct me if I'm wrong.

I do agree with the others about taking the MCAT first. Take a year off and study for the MCAT. Who knows maybe you'll score MD level!
 
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