Translation problem

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by BellKicker, May 7, 2002.

  1. BellKicker

    BellKicker Twisted Miler

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    Hi.

    What do you call it when you place an intravenous catheder?

    Place a drop?
    Place an iv?
    Do a venesectio (I have a feeling that ain't it).

    Another word than place?

    And what is meant by a central line? Is that the same as intrathecal?

    Thank you.
     
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  3. UCMonkey

    UCMonkey Senior Member

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    I've always heard it referred to as "starting an IV".

    About the central line - as far as I know, its not the same as an intrathecal. The way I understand it, an intrathecal delivers its contents into the spinal fluid. Central lines are placed in the subclavian or femoral arteries.

    Anyone with more experience, feel free to correct me.
     
  4. LaCirujana

    LaCirujana Smoking Gun

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    Dane--
    Monkeyrunner is right about "starting an IV." That would be the equivalent of "placing an IV" or "placing an intravenous catheter."

    Intrathecal catheters do deliver their contents into the spinal fluid--they are often used for management of severe, chronic pain.

    Central lines are intravenous (not arterial) lines that are not "peripheral." They are most commonly placed in the subclavian or internal jugular veins. They can be placed in the femoral vein, as well, which often happens in trauma situations when massive quantities of blood and fluids may need to be delivered rapidly (it's also a very easy place to get the line into). Femoral lines are less desirable because they interfere with patient mobility, thereby setting up the conditions that can lead to DVTs.

    "Place a drop?" Do you mean "start a drip?" This refers to starting a steady intravenous infusion at a set rate of some medication, such as a pressor.

    As for "do a venesectio," two possibilities come to mind--"perform a venous cut-down" or "perform a vivisection." Do either of these fit the context? I'm happy to explain either.
     
  5. BellKicker

    BellKicker Twisted Miler

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    OK, I got it. Start in IV. Place an IV.

    Surg2002, I meant venipuncture. There is a picture of it in my medical dictionary along with a description that matches what I would call "an IV".

    I was telling my wife a story about my first IV attempt (or venipuncture). She's American, and swears she's never heard it called a venipuncture.

    Anyway, (in my story) I missed the vein (probably by a mile), panicked and thought it clever to pull out the stylet and press on the bleeding wound with 8 million cotton balls. Hey, it was gonna stop at some point, eh? Now, the hand started to grow. Bummer. I had forgotten all about the tourniquet. The poor patient must still have a hematoma today, 3 years later.

    Here's the proper procedure for saving IVs gone bad:

    Remove tournequet.
    Elevate arm.
    Apply pressure.
    Blame the patient for moving around too much ("I'm just a student, you know").
    Ask politely if it's ok to try again ("or should I call the REAL doctor").
    When she says no, slither away.
     
  6. BellKicker

    BellKicker Twisted Miler

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    Moonwalk by the nurses station while singing "feeling hot hot hot".
     
  7. GATC

    GATC Member

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    Hilarious......DANEMD

    Cracking up!!!!
     
  8. LaCirujana

    LaCirujana Smoking Gun

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    Oh..... VENIPUNCTURE ! If your wife is American, it makes sense that she's never heard starting an IV referred to that way--I haven't either. Most commonly used to refer to phlebotomy procedures.

    Great story, BTW.
     

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