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US Citizens - school/practice in UK?

mtg

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I have been giving thought to the possibility of moving to the UK - possibly England or Scotland... I am a US citizen and my question is this:

Does anyone know whether a US citizen can attend a medical school in the UK?

If so, do you know if US Financial aid is available? (ie: Stafford, etc)

Also, if one attends medical school in the UK but is a US citizen, can one practice and live in the UK while maintaining US citizenship after medical school/residency? If not, is dual citizenship a possibility?

I know that some of these issues are best directed at someone in the consulate or department of State, but I was hoping to get a "medically oriented" response rather than the generic answer I'd most likely get from the aforementioned consular folks.

If anyone has experience or knowledge on these matters, I'd love to hear from you.


Thanks!
Mike
 

Dreamer

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The problem with dual citizenship is the next, the US generally doesn't acknowledge, but if another country is OK with it, the US is OK also. The UK shouldn't have any problem with dual citizenship since theu are the Euro Union member, but you should contact their Embassy.
 
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Graham

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You should think about the Irish medical schools which are really strong, have superb american links and have straightforward admissions systems. Have a look at www.rcsi.ie for example

Good luck

Graham

Originally posted by mtg:
•I have been giving thought to the possibility of moving to the UK - possibly England or Scotland... I am a US citizen and my question is this:

Does anyone know whether a US citizen can attend a medical school in the UK?

If so, do you know if US Financial aid is available? (ie: Stafford, etc)

Also, if one attends medical school in the UK but is a US citizen, can one practice and live in the UK while maintaining US citizenship after medical school/residency? If not, is dual citizenship a possibility?

I know that some of these issues are best directed at someone in the consulate or department of State, but I was hoping to get a "medically oriented" response rather than the generic answer I'd most likely get from the aforementioned consular folks.

If anyone has experience or knowledge on these matters, I'd love to hear from you.


Thanks!
Mike•
 

Ponyboy

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Originally posted by Annette:
•Sorry, Dreamer, dual citizenship doesn't work like that. If you take citizenship in another country, you lose your US citizenship. However, if you are already a citizen of the UK, then you can get dual citizenship when you become a US citizen.•

Actually, you do not have to give up your US citizenship if you acquire the citizenship of another country (I acquired citizenship from other countries secondary to my American citizenship). As long as it isn't a country that is hostile towards the US and you don't renounce your US citizenship, you can carry both citizenships.
 

Annette

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Ponyboy and Dreamer, looks like I am both wrong and right. Unless you are "intentionally" giving up US citizenship, then you can retain US citizenship. This is a change from several years ago when taking citizenship in a foreign country was considered to be an "expatriotable" offense.
http://travel.state.gov/loss.html
 

roo

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Hi Mike,

I can't help you with laws in America about dual citizenships. However, I can try to offer some other aspects of your question.

Currently, and likely for the next 15-20 years at least, the UK is very much short of physicians. There is significant recruitment of well-trained, qualified doctors from other countries into the UK, as waiting lists pile up (around 2 years for hip operation in some areas now). Can get an overview as things changed by reading the free online full-content BMJ.com, as current trends with the NHS will be covered every few weeks.

As Graham mentioned, Ireland is also a consideration, which will also provide a strong education in medicine. Irish and UK programs are usually 5-6 years in length, and provide degrees in Medicine and another in Surgery upon graduation. (Ireland is trained with has a 3rd degree in Obstetrics also). Some Irish do post-graduate work in the UK, Australia is also a popular destination, perhaps students have become interested by watching the Aussie soap "Neighbours" for so long, that they want to go there :).I _believe_ there is now a test to be written in order to post-grad train in UK from Ireland now, and that it is quite difficult of a test. May wish to ask about that if considering that route.

The UK medschools traditionally have favored any non-UK students to be from 2nd, 3rd world countries, with the aim to return and improve care in their home countries. However, in practice, there are people from America who have chosen to do their medschool training in the UK.

Choose your UK school carefully by talking to someone who is either currently there, or graduated _recently_ from your desired school, since their has been significant shakeups during the the UK medical school mergers a while back, and you want to be aware of any school's issues if they are imporant to you: for example a very large class sizes from the merging of 2 schools, or extended commutes between the two former campuses for class.

Best wishes,
roo
 

leorl

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Just to add my two cents to the Ireland option. Royal College of Surgeons is good, but if you are also considering Ireland, Trinity College has a very good reputation, especially in paediatrics, obstetrics, surgery, anaesthetics, gerontology and a couple others. Plus has connections with a lot of US hospitals. (It's like a 2 second walk from College of surgeons too) :D
 
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