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Valid Concerns Against DO?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by gopens67, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. gopens67

    10+ Year Member

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    Not being accepted by super competitive allopathic residencies.

    Not wanting to take multiple board exams (both Comlex and Usmle)

    Not wanting to do extra internships to practice in certain states (How long are these internships)

    Anyone who could comment on these matters would be very helpful thank you.
     
  2. iowafarmstud

    iowafarmstud Official Dreamer
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    FIRST--a simple search with some of these words will give you AMPLE reading material on the subjects...but since it's 3AM and work is going slow, I will indulge.

    1. Competitive allopathic residencies: They are competitive for a reason...MD or DO, you have to perform well. With that said, DO's have plenty of Osteopathic residencies in very competitive specialties. Will you be at Harvard doing Neurosurgery? Probably not...but can you become a Neurosurgeon? YES!

    2. The USMLE/COMLEX debate has been discussed a lot. Some say take it, others say don't waste your time. If you want a competitive allo spot though, you will most likely need to take both and do GREAT on both(or at least the USMLE) to have a shot.

    3. Internships: If you do a DO residency, they are built in so you don't have to worry about an "extra" year, as there is no extra year. If you want an allo residency that starts on PGY1 then you will need to either a) do a year internship before/after residency or b) submit and try to get your residency approved if it is not already a dually accredited program. So at worst, you have one extra year if you are NOT approved, do an Allo residency, and start PGY1.


    Best advice I can give is first worry about getting INTO a medical school...MD or DO...before worrying about competitive specialties or board scores. It is what you make it to be. If you want a super competitive allo spot at a place that has never taken a DO....well, work hard and go get it! The worst they can say is no.
    Good luck!:luck:
     
  3. spicedmanna

    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    In what way does the phrase, "super competitive," not compute? Everyone has a tough time with super competitive programs, not just DO's. If you mean to say that there may be ACGME programs that don't have any DO's, or may not readily accept them, then, yes, such programs do exist. However, don't forget that there are AOA residencies, too.

    Then don't. Apply to AOA programs, dually-accredited programs, and/or programs that readily welcome the COMLEX. All residency programs that receive public funding are required to accept the COMLEX. Thus, taking the USMLE isn't a requirement for such programs. However, many advise taking it in addition to the COMLEX if you are applying to ACGME programs, particularly the more competitive ones. It helps the programs compare you better and potentially open more doors. Boards are important, no doubt about that, but don't neglect how rotating in the program you want to match can make a difference, too.

    The year-long traditional rotating internships are required by five states for licensing purposes. If you do an AOA program, it will, in most cases, be included and you won't have to do a thing. However, if you choose to do an ACGME residency, you may have to a traditional rotating internship first, provided you want to practice in one of the five states and don't get approval for your first year to count as the traditional internship (you can apply for this).

    Don't get too tied up on what specialty you want to do, etc. People tend to change their mind, sometimes multiple times. Concentrate on getting into medical school. Apply to a wide-variety of schools and to osteopathic medical schools, too, if any of them interest you. Take your acceptance(s) and then decide on the best program that fits you. However, if you don't want to be a DO, then don't. Nobody's forcing you. Attending an osteopathic medical school probably won't be the limiting factor in your success. People tend to limit themselves first.

    A lot of people come in with grand ideas of what specialty they want to match, but guess what? Not everybody can actually accomplish it, based on their performance, and most simply won't be able to match into the super-competitive specialties. In this respect, it really doesn't matter whether you attend an allopathic or osteopathic medical school. If you don't have a competitive application, the kind that sets you apart from the crowd, attending an allopathic medical school isn't going to be the magic wand that gets you the match.
     
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    #3 spicedmanna, Jan 3, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2009
  4. stonewall22

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    Prestigious institutions such as Mayo Clinic, University of Washington, Harvard, University of Michigan (and I am certain there are others) have all taken DOs in the past, and I would bet that the stigma against DOs is eroding more and more. If you just want to practice medicine, then the reality is just about any residency, AOA or ACGME, will get you there. If you want to find a cure for cancer and be a medical researcher then you're probably better off going to an allopathic school or one of the few DO schools were students do significant research (Michigan State, for example). Good luck!
     
  5. Taus

    Taus .
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    If you want to see where DO's have been going for residency, just check the match lists of the more established DO schools..... the proof is always in the pudding.

    About the extra year issue: There are several different ways to either avoid it or have it included in your residency. It is very, very rare to do an extra year these days if you are informed about the issue ahead of time.

    I only took 1 extra board exam (USMLE step 1) and will be taking COMLEX for the rest and for my medical license. Is it ideal to have to take one more exam?...no...but it's not a big deal.

    Good luck.
     
    #5 Taus, Jan 5, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
  6. DrMom

    DrMom Official Mom of SDN
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    It's even better than this. Traditional rotating internships are almost all gone as the intern year has now been fully incorporated into the DO residencies. All of the 5 states automatically count a DO intern year for the licensure requirements.

    Also, I'm in one of the oft-quoted 5 states (Oklahoma) and our licensure board does NOT require an osteopathic internship. They do require certain rotations during intern year which may or may not be do-able during an MD intern year (it's definitely doable for FM (usually don't even have to do anything extra), likely workable in EM, maybe some IM and peds). Any DO intern year does automatically fulfill the requirements in my state, though.
     
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  7. ericr29

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    Everyone here seems to be right on. I have D.O. friends who are doing their residencies at The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Don't limit yourself, pursue what is best for you, and if you excel - there will be no boundaries. :thumbup:
     
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