Malignant Fibromyalgia

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I got a lot out of this forum when I was a medical student. So now that I'm on the other side I would like to give back. I am in the residency leadership at program X. Every year, we review hundreds of applications, and here are the lessons learned. Keep in mind, much of this is my personal opinion and others might disagree.

What do you look for in an application?

I go straight to the SLOES and start at the bottom, where you are compared to your classmates in 2 categories. Take a look at a copy of a SLOE. It is very informative and will tell you how you will be judged. Then I read the narrative summary. I might skim your other letters, looking for red flags, but if it is not an EM letter and they don't call you an axe murderer I don't care.

I know the SLOE can be harsh, but we really try to make it honest. Sorry, by definition not everyone can be top 10%.

I then skim your CV just to see if anything stands out. Then I skim your Dean's Letter for red flags. I don't care what you psych grade was.

I skim your personal statement. I read one once, and when I woke up I realized I never wanted to read one again. That said, others take a good look at them, so don't blow them off.

Next FAQ will be on what you SHOULD place on your personal statement. Gotta go work now.
 

HoosierdaddyO

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Honest question here...you say you look at SLOEs first...how much of a saving grace can an excellent SLOE from an ACGME residency program be for an individual with average stats. I guess I'm trying to gauge how much of a wow factor can an top notch SLOE give to an average joe kinda fella?
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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Define average stats. We will notice a 1,1 SLOE, but if you failed Step 1 three times it might not help much. This might be a good time to post the FAQ:


What are good step scores?

This is a highly variable topic where you will find a wide range of opinion. So, take what I say with a grain of salt.

I know that it is cold and heartless to reduce you to a number, but please realize our side. First, your step scores are the only standardized way we have to compare you. You all come from different medical schools with different grading systems. Second, there is this little thing at the end of your residency called the Board Certification Exam that you have to pass. We as programs are rated on our graduates' board pass rate. You may be the sweetest person in the world, but if you have a 202 Step 1, you have proven yourself to be a poor test taker. Pretty much every person in the history of our program who failed the boards had a low Step score.

We do put more stock in Step 2 than Step 1, and so you do have an opportunity to redeem yourself. If you get a 205 on Step 1 and let us know about your horrible gastro with explosive diarrhea that you had while taking the test and then turn around and get a 260 on Step 2, we could consider that. I am exaggerating for effect, but the idea is valid.

As far as actual numbers, when we review our applications we will sort them, and then put the floor somewhere in the 2-teens. We probably won't look at anybody under that unless there are special circumstances. However, this is the floor. Regarding the question above this is the zone where you would need some rockin' SLOEs.

The converse is also true. We have all met people with astronomical board scores who were born without a personality. If I see someone with a high board score I look harder to make sure they aren't weird. If you have the special combo of high boards and cool personality, you are golden. I would take a likeable, hard-worker with a 220 over a candidate with a 260 and cluster B personality traits.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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What should I put in my personal statement?

This is your place to:
1. Explain any red flags or irregularities in your application.
2. Describe a real life experience that you had that I would actually be interested in hearing. (I'm an emergency physician, I know what dying people look like. I know you've seen them. But if you were an astronaut or a professional human cannonball I might want to hear about that.)

If neither 1 or 2 applies to you, just write a nice, articulate personal statement that doesn't rock the boat. Remember this cardinal rule: Do not sound like an insufferable prick. So many times, medical students feel the need to inflate their experiences to sound more impressive. I do not want to hear about the time you rushed to put the nasal cannula on the hypoxemic patient and saved the day. If truly the only thing that your soul yearns to write about is that patient experience that made you decide on EM you can do so, just make sure it sets the right tone.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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How can I do a good interview?

Really, this shouldn't be anything you don't know already. Mostly, as with the personal statements, don't be an idiot. Don't be a bump on a log. On the other hand, don't be over the top. When I am sitting there in my office with you the question I am asking myself is if I could stand to work with you. I know what's in your application. This is your time to show me that you can carry a conversation.

Also, please do not labor under the delusion that what happens at one program won't get out. It is a small world, and we have ways of hearing about problem or inconsiderate candidates.

If we invite you to interview, and you decide not to come or you cancel, it is ok. I am not offended. But please let us know ASAP. Do not hang onto interviews and cancel them late. This is rude to us and your fellow applicants who want that spot. If you one of those top tier applicants (and you know who you are), do not hold on to 20 interview spots. Cancel some. Let your fellow students have them. You can only match at one program. We have limited time and resources to interview, so it is important that we keep the spots as full as possible on our end.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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Why am I not getting interviews?

Patience. I know that ERAS opened a whole week ago, but we are still sifting thorough the hundreds of applications we received. Our program's goal is to have the first round out by Oct. You will get interview invites throughout the season as people cancel and shuffle.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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I did not get an interview at Program X. Was my application not worthy enough?

Absolutely not! Please understand how random this process is. Each program will have hundreds of qualified applicants, and we simply cannot invite them all. It might be something random that catches someone's eye. "Hey, you're from my home town, we might have something to talk about." At times in the past we have had people interested in our program call to follow up and see if they can get an interview. When we looked, we found that they had simply been overlooked. It's really easy to skip a line on a spreadsheet with so many rows. If you are truly interested in a program, it might help to express interest, and then be ready to accept an interview later in the season when they open up.
 

Fox800

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I did not get an interview at Program X. Was my application not worthy enough?

Absolutely not! Please understand how random this process is. Each program will have hundreds of qualified applicants, and we simply cannot invite them all. It might be something random that catches someone's eye. "Hey, you're from my home town, we might have something to talk about." At times in the past we have had people interested in our program call to follow up and see if they can get an interview. When we looked, we found that they had simply been overlooked. It's really easy to skip a line on a spreadsheet with so many rows. If you are truly interested in a program, it might help to express interest, and then be ready to accept an interview later in the season when they open up.
Amazing user name.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

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As I am sitting here reviewing ERAS I am reminded of something else. Have at least one other person (who is not your mother and doesn't think you are cute no matter what) take a look at the photo you are uploading and make sure you do not look drunk, stoned, or like a serial killer. Also, please include a photo that looks like how you plan to appear on interview day. We get lost with all the names and can usually only remember you by picture. If your ERAS picture doesn't look like our mental image of you when you interviewed it is hard to keep you straight.
 
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cbrons

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As I am sitting here reviewing ERAS I am reminded of something else. Have at least one other person (who is not your mother and doesn't think you are cute no matter what) take a look at the photo you are uploading and make sure you do not look drunk, stoned, or like a serial killer. Also, please include a photo that looks like how you plan to appear on interview day. We get lost with all the names and can usually only remember you by picture. If your ERAS picture doesn't look like our mental image of you when you interviewed it is hard to keep you straight.
Best nickname on SDN
 

AlmostAnMD

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Most programs require three letters, from what I'm reading on ERAS. My third letter probably won't be uploaded until mid october

bad? good? doesn't matter?
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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Pretty much everybody requires 3 letters. Some can be non-SLOEs but really don't get read. If they are all SLOEs that's great. If you have 2 SLOEs it is fine. If you have 1 SLOE you are at a disadvantage. No SLOEs and hopefully you have a very good reason (coming out of military) or you have compromising pictures of several program directors* We will invite with 2 SLOEs on the books in most cases.

*If you want compromising pictures of PDs you should come to CORD in Nashville in March.
 

Fox800

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I was planning to have 3 SLOEs uploaded by 10/1, but my 3rd hasn't posted yet. I honored it, and it's from the biggest name place that I auditioned at. Should I submit the other 2 SLOEs (1 honors/1 HP) I have plus a family medicine LoR on 9/30 if the 3rd SLOE still hasn't posted?
 
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racerwad

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I was planning to have 3 SLOEs uploaded by 10/1, but my 3rd hasn't posted yet. I honored it, and it's from the biggest name place that I auditioned at. Should I submit the other 2 SLOEs (1 honors/1 HP) I have plus a family medicine LoR on 9/30 if the 3rd SLOE still hasn't posted?
Yes; skip the FM letter and upload and notify programs when your last SLOE drops.
 
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How favorably (or unfavorably) is a potential candidate viewed if (s)he has completed a previous residency particularly in primary care? Apart from the usual funding issues, is it viewed as a negative? Is it worth the attempt and pan-applying (dropping almost $3k)! Granted it is a lot easier after making an attending salary :)

Been thinking this over for a while.

thanks
 

racerwad

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So most programs expect you to have three letters submitted by 10/1, right? I guess I'll add the FM LoR to the other 2 EM SLOEs to make three letters.
Ummm, I don't know the policies of other programs, I was just saying I wouldn't bother with the FM letter and just upload the last SLOE when it comes. If there are programs you are really interested in, just call or email - they're busy but usually helpful. Good luck!
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

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How favorably (or unfavorably) is a potential candidate viewed if (s)he has completed a previous residency particularly in primary care? Apart from the usual funding issues, is it viewed as a negative? Is it worth the attempt and pan-applying (dropping almost $3k)! Granted it is a lot easier after making an attending salary :)

Been thinking this over for a while.

thanks
It's been done before, many times. You might have trouble getting EM letters, though, and this will be your biggest hangup. If I see non-trads, former military, etc who are able to pull off getting a SLOE somehow I am impressed. If you were a good candidate for your first residency then you might be one for your second. You might need to work on your narrative to sell yourself. Perhaps I should mention an FAQ that I've been thinking about posting for a while:

Is prior experience a plus?

The answer is--it depends. These are high risk/high reward candidates. We have all had residents with prior experience that have used their knowledge well and been rock stars. We have also all seen those with prior experience (whether it be EMS, nursing, PA, other medical specialty, etc) that have been utterly unteachable. Yes, I know you have done this before a different way. But here, in our house, in our specialty, this is how we do it. I would rather take an eager, teachable, blank slate than an experienced, inflexible resident. This is frankly one of the reasons why I prefer former military GMOs--they understand the chain of command.

So, if you have prior experience, make sure to sell yourself as someone who might bring something extra to the table, but is willing to get down and be humbled again as an intern and build yourself back up.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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Ummm, I don't know the policies of other programs, I was just saying I wouldn't bother with the FM letter and just upload the last SLOE when it comes. If there are programs you are really interested in, just call or email - they're busy but usually helpful. Good luck!
There is room for >3 letters in ERAS. ERAS does have some filters in which only candidates with 3 LORs are shown. (The program does not distinguish between EM and non EM letters.) So, if a reviewer happens to be using one of those filters, it might behoove you to upload the FM letter and add the SLOE later. (my 2 cents.)
 
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nejadm

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Dr Fibro, thanks for much for doing this. But one question I have to ask you haven't covered... how do you review an IMGs application in contrast to that of and US Senior or DO?
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

Malignant Fibromyalgia

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Dr Fibro, thanks for much for doing this. But one question I have to ask you haven't covered... how do you review an IMGs application in contrast to that of and US Senior or DO?
To be brutally honest, we don't. Ours, like many programs, filter out IMGs. Again, it sucks, but there are just so many US grads applying that we have no need to look further. There are some programs that have matched IMGs. Usually in EM you will find that brand new programs that are not participating in the match the first year will take IMGs outside the match. There are other programs that have an international medicine flavor that will take IMGs, but usually as an agreement with some foreign nation for somebody already in their pipeline. Your best bet is to pound the pavement, look for programs that currently have IMGs, and have a firm backup plan. Best of luck!
 
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HoosierdaddyO

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I am kind of curious...what are some criteria that programs can use to filter applicants. I'm sure there is the obvious USMD vs IMG, and step scores but are there other common ones, and not necessarily at your program but at others as well that you might have heard about lol. Thanks Fibro :)
 

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You can filter by anything you want, but you probably have to do most of it manually. For example, my program didn't take DOs for a long, long time. I see three on their list of current residents now though.

I wouldn't be surprised if many programs throw you out if you had anything less than honors or high pass in your EM rotations. I mean, just sit down and think. You've got 800 applicants. You want to interview 100 for your ten spots. You know from past experience that you'll need to invite 150 to get 100 interviews. How are you going to decide which ones to send an invite to? You're not going to read every word of 800 applications. The IMG/DO/Board score/No 2 SLOE cutoffs are an awfully convenient way to go from 800 to 300 really fast.
 

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Anything that is discrete data in ERAS (and not a federally protected class) can be used to filter applications. You can even filter by presence/absence of a photo. And they're pretty easy to implement, which makes it easy to do iterative and sequential filters.
 

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Following prior comments re: being a candidate that might end up screened out - in this case, if you feel that you have an application that really stands out otherwise, and you feel like you might have gotten filtered, it may help to reach out to programs and be like "hey I think I may have been filtered out because___, but I think the rest of my app shows I'm a badass and this this why..." It might get them to take closer look at your app, it may not. But really do try to limit yourself to the places you think you'd really want to be, and places you feel like you're otherwise lining up with, but you're not hearing from. If people start doing it indiscriminately, and people who don't fit a pretty narrow window of candidates, this is just going to be another component of the Marginal Candidate Arms Race, and programs are going to stop paying attention to such things.
 
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Can you get "unfiltered?" Both of my SLOEs came in after I applied and one just a few days ago (post Oct 1). I'm not sure if I should email the programs letting them know my application is complete, or not. Also, what about when you get your Step 2 results and release them. Thanks in advance.
 
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jgauger

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You can filter by anything you want, but you probably have to do most of it manually. For example, my program didn't take DOs for a long, long time. I see three on their list of current residents now though.

I wouldn't be surprised if many programs throw you out if you had anything less than honors or high pass in your EM rotations. I mean, just sit down and think. You've got 800 applicants. You want to interview 100 for your ten spots. You know from past experience that you'll need to invite 150 to get 100 interviews. How are you going to decide which ones to send an invite to? You're not going to read every word of 800 applications. The IMG/DO/Board score/No 2 SLOE cutoffs are an awfully convenient way to go from 800 to 300 really fast.
When filtering based on something like not having 2 SLOEs, when would a program do that and would they later revisit those apps that were filtered out earlier? It would be heartbreaking to hear that I've been filtered out of some programs for not having a second SLOE, when there is nothing I can do to get the clerkship director to upload it any faster. Thank you.
 
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racerwad

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When the second SLOE comes in, just give the program(s) a call and let them know. If you haven't been outright rejected, then you are just in the queue awaiting review.

Regarding when a program may filter for <2 SLOES - this happens a fair amount. When they revisit is program dependent. If it were me, I would contact programs when new, relevant information gets added to ERAS.
 

The White Coat Investor

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When filtering based on something like not having 2 SLOEs, when would a program do that and would they later revisit those apps that were filtered out earlier? It would be heartbreaking to hear that I've been filtered out of some programs for not having a second SLOE, when there is nothing I can do to get the clerkship director to upload it any faster. Thank you.
You've never had your heart broken before? If there is a rejection or delay that "breaks your heart" CALL THE PROGRAM to express your interest. Don't do this for 30 programs, but maybe 1 or 2 is fine. It's a numbers game. Recognize that and play it well. They don't hate you, but they're only going to send out 150 invites. They'd rather send them to 50 people who would put their program # 1 on their list and 100 "I hope they're interesteds" than 150 "I hope they're interesteds." Be one of the #1 rankers.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

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I'm sorry to dredge up an old thread, but I'm noticing a trend this year. If your application has the words "safe space" anywhere on it, that is a huge red flag. There is no such thing as a safe space in the ED. I know it's all the rage in education, but we want to know that you can operate out in the real world. We are sorting through, trying to find the least millennial-sounding millennials we can.
 

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I'm sorry to dredge up an old thread, but I'm noticing a trend this year. If your application has the words "safe space" anywhere on it, that is a huge red flag. There is no such thing as a safe space in the ED. I know it's all the rage in education, but we want to know that you can operate out in the real world. We are sorting through, trying to find the least millennial-sounding millennials we can.
See? It's not just me, millennials.
 

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I'm sorry to dredge up an old thread, but I'm noticing a trend this year. If your application has the words "safe space" anywhere on it, that is a huge red flag. There is no such thing as a safe space in the ED. I know it's all the rage in education, but we want to know that you can operate out in the real world. We are sorting through, trying to find the least millennial-sounding millennials we can.
While I certainly agree the term is over used and may indicate a need for coddling, what you're essentially saying in this post is that my app would have a red flag to you because I used the words "safe space events" to describe my duties of leading an LGTQA organization on campus which seems... wrong?
 

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While I certainly agree the term is over used and may indicate a need for coddling, what you're essentially saying in this post is that my app would have a red flag to you because I used the words "safe space events" to describe my duties of leading an LGTQA organization on campus which seems... wrong?
Sorry but there are no safe spaces in real life.
 
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Malignant Fibromyalgia

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While I certainly agree the term is over used and may indicate a need for coddling, what you're essentially saying in this post is that my app would have a red flag to you because I used the words "safe space events" to describe my duties of leading an LGTQA organization on campus which seems... wrong?
Obviously, if you were the one giving aid or comfort that is a good thing. Advocacy is a positive human endeavor, but I've certainly seen people who have oversold it to the point where they sound intolerant to those with different views. We want people who will go along and get along with everybody. This goes for everyone. By its very nature, the patient population in the emergency department is one of the most diverse groups of people you will find anywhere (true, de facto diversity--not the ivory tower academic construct).

If you're conservative, you need to get along with liberals. If you're liberal, you need to get along with conservatives. If we get any hint that you are going to be carrying a torch at a Klan rally, or if you are going to pull an Antifa and burn down the ED (figuratively or literally) if you meet someone you don't agree with, that is a serious red flag.

You will be insulted, yelled at, spit on, punched, kicked, and all other manner of things that people should not have happen to them (and that's just from the consultants, you should see the patients). We will always go to the mat to protect our residents, but you will have your feelz hurt. That is the nature of the specialty. We are looking for people who can handle that. If not, that doesn't mean someone's a bad person. But, another specialty might be a better fit.
 

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You should think of what would be THE most difficult patient you could see (and, if you're thinking medical problems, you are not even on the map), and then put another issue on that. Traditional Indian woman in a sari, gay, and bipolar. Anything that torques your gears, think of that. Raging Republicans, potheads, sanctimonious religious people, drunks, teetotalers, you name it. These are all the people you have to see, dispassionately. Whatever is their issue, they've been living with it longer than you. You can't let your biases color your care. It's why I don't want to know for what reason an inmate is in the penitentiary.

If you wear a yarmulke, or a turban, you WILL be ethnically insulted. That's what happens in the ED. It's not right, but, also, the vast, vast majority of the time, you will be the most educated person in the ED.

As my esteemed colleague says, if you're not ok with that, maybe another specialty is in order.
 

pepes1lv1a

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If you're conservative, you need to get along with liberals. If you're liberal, you need to get along with conservatives. If we get any hint that you are going to be carrying a torch at a Klan rally, or if you are going to pull an Antifa and burn down the ED (figuratively or literally) if you meet someone you don't agree with, that is a serious red flag.

Thank you for bumping this thread, I had never seen it and it's really helpful perspective. It raised a few questions for me though:

1) If abortion clinic escorting is my main extracurricular volunteer activity (also listed representing planned parenthood at a state government hearing) did I inadvertently raise a red flag as a politically divisive applicant? I guess I may have overestimated the socially liberal tendencies of the academic EM crowd...

2) My step 1 score was well above average but (I found out today) my step 2 score went down a little. Still fine but not the usual pattern and much closer to average. Is that trend going to count against me?

Edit to clarify: I don't otherwise portray myself as the nazi-punching type in my application, though privately, I have no problem with it. I'd certainly hope nazi punchers would be judged far less harshly than the actual nazis/white supremacists on a theoretical level even if neither group is going to be particularly successful at racking up the interview invites
 
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Apollyon

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1) If abortion clinic escorting is my main extracurricular volunteer activity (also listed representing planned parenthood at a state government hearing) did I inadvertently raise a red flag as a politically divisive applicant
Panda Bear - long gone - wrote one time, "never do a job that you wouldn't wear on a t-shirt", and his example was "future abortion provider".

So, I don't know, but, just assume that the person interviewing you is 100% opposed to your viewpoints. That should give you some perspective. If they are any less than 100%, score!
 
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I'm sorry to dredge up an old thread, but I'm noticing a trend this year. If your application has the words "safe space" anywhere on it, that is a huge red flag. There is no such thing as a safe space in the ED. I know it's all the rage in education, but we want to know that you can operate out in the real world. We are sorting through, trying to find the least millennial-sounding millennials we can.
I agree. Any mention at all, of emotional ‘safe space’ and it’s believed existence outside of academeutopia, let alone on a job or school application translates unquestionably into “I’m not ready for the real world, about which I have profoundly unrealistic and expectations.”

I understand if this safe space stuff was taught to you in college, but I can assure you, in the post-collegiate world, talking about it is not going to lead to one being viewed in a serious way. Because it just doesn’t exist. It’s just not a thing. It was invented out of thin air by academia for the short term emotional benefit of students, at the expense of their long term preparedness. Any mention of it, is just going to make one look green, naive and in for massive rude awakenings and a setup for rapid disappointment and disillusionment once tested in a world that can be profoundly harsh and even dangerous, at times.

There is no emotional ‘safe space’ when you try to resuscitate a child abused by a drunken, drug addicted parent and you’re unable to. There’s no emotional ‘safe space’ when a consultant with a personality disorder exhibits some sort of cataclysmic behavioral maladaptation at 4:30 am when you only slept 3 hours in the last 24 hours, a patient’s life hangs in the balance and 20 more people just piled into the waiting room.

If they taught you about ‘safe space’ in college and you enojyed the concept or whatever, fine. But word to the wise, is to leave it out of your applications, personal statements and job interviews. That’s just one man’s opinion.
 
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29
87
Thank you for bumping this thread, I had never seen it and it's really helpful perspective. It raised a few questions for me though:

1) If abortion clinic escorting is my main extracurricular volunteer activity (also listed representing planned parenthood at a state government hearing) did I inadvertently raise a red flag as a politically divisive applicant? I guess I may have overestimated the socially liberal tendencies of the academic EM crowd...

2) My step 1 score was well above average but (I found out today) my step 2 score went down a little. Still fine but not the usual pattern and much closer to average. Is that trend going to count against me?

Edit to clarify: I don't otherwise portray myself as the nazi-punching type in my application, though privately, I have no problem with it. I'd certainly hope nazi punchers would be judged far less harshly than the actual nazis/white supremacists on a theoretical level even if neither group is going to be particularly successful at racking up the interview invites
I hate Nazis, even more than I hate communists. However, if you are the type of person who sees violence as a justified manner to deal with somebody whose viewpoints you don't like, no matter how repugnant, then you are exactly the kind of person I'm talking about.

The further away you get from the university, the less sure you can be that everyone is a liberal. Community docs are the most conservative. However, there are a lot of people in academics who are conservative as well. Once you get outside of your bubble, you realize what real diversity is like.
 

pepes1lv1a

Bird Law Medicine
5+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2013
356
107
Status
Medical Student
Panda Bear - long gone - wrote one time, "never do a job that you wouldn't wear on a t-shirt", and his example was "future abortion provider"
If this is a trap, I'll have you know it's working. Good thing I am far too calm and collected a paragon of professionalism to get caught up in wildly irrelevant healthcare policy debate on an elliptical typing with one finger
 

pepes1lv1a

Bird Law Medicine
5+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2013
356
107
Status
Medical Student
I hate Nazis, even more than I hate communists. However, if you are the type of person who sees violence as a justified manner to deal with somebody whose viewpoints you don't like, no matter how repugnant, then you are exactly the kind of person I'm talking about.

The further away you get from the university, the less sure you can be that everyone is a liberal. Community docs are the most conservative. However, there are a lot of people in academics who are conservative as well. Once you get outside of your bubble, you realize what real diversity is like.
Point well taken. I'm at a school in the South so I've certainly encountered all types of conservative docs/patients and gotten practice keeping a lid on my personal views. However, reproductive freedom is a cause I care enough about that I reasoned I probably wouldn't be a good fit for the type of program that would count it against me. Then again, I was kind of counting on those programs being the exception rather than the rule.

Anyway, thanks very much for your input. Typing finger fatiguing rapidly
 

Apollyon

Screw the GST
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2002
20,322
5,107
SCREW IT!
If this is a trap, I'll have you know it's working. Good thing I am far too calm and collected a paragon of professionalism to get caught up in wildly irrelevant healthcare policy debate on an elliptical typing with one finger
No, legit, straight up. His number was 8744. See if you can locate any of his stuff. For years, SDN archived his posts. Epic stuff.
 

Birdstrike

7+ Year Member
Dec 19, 2010
5,242
4,425
Status
Point well taken. I'm at a school in the South so I've certainly encountered all types of conservative docs/patients and gotten practice keeping a lid on my personal views. However, reproductive freedom is a cause I care enough about that I reasoned I probably wouldn't be a good fit for the type of program that would count it against me. Then again, I was kind of counting on those programs being the exception rather than the rule.

Anyway, thanks very much for your input. Typing finger fatiguing rapidly
Whether you’re right wing, left wing, in the middle or don’t care, generally work is (and should be) too busy to spend any meaningful amount of time on politics or debating. The common focus tends to be on work, and political leanings generally shouldn’t play a role. Work is about getting work done. I personally have no clue as to the political leanings of the majority of people I work with, and have worked with. For the most part, it doesn’t matter, when the common goal is to get work done providing medical care and services. If you work in politics or public policy, that’s obvisouly not the case, but in medicine, I’ve found it to be so, the majority of time and places. People couldn’t care less if you’re politically opposed to them if you’re agreeable to work with, work hard and efficiently. Similarly, no amount of common political or philosophical ground can make up for a lazy, inefficient coworker who’s miserable to be around.
 
Sep 7, 2017
5
0
Status
Medical Student
Thank you for this FAQ thread!

I have one question: Does your program, or other programs that you know of, have anything against couples matching? Will your program be less likely to take a couple into the program, or can one applicant actually help the other match into the same program?
 

alpinism

Give Em' the Jet Fuel
7+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2011
3,105
2,768
Port Au Prince
Thank you for this FAQ thread!

I have one question: Does your program, or other programs that you know of, have anything against couples matching? Will your program be less likely to take a couple into the program, or can one applicant actually help the other match into the same program?
Depends on whether the other applicant is a strong applicant.