What is your major?

  • Biology / Chemistry / BioChem

    Votes: 57 60.6%
  • Engineering (CS, EE, Math, Physics, or others)

    Votes: 17 18.1%
  • Business

    Votes: 6 6.4%
  • Social Science / English

    Votes: 13 13.8%
  • Art Performance (Music, Art, Dancing, or others)

    Votes: 1 1.1%

  • Total voters
    94

grettlin2

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So now, you are going to apply or you have been accepted to dental schools. What is your undergraduate major?
 
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MINI430

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Biomedical Engineering with a minor in Management Technology
 

grettlin2

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Hi Mini. I was going to choose Biomedical Engineering as my major, but finally, I did not.
Is it more engineering related or biology related?
 

714guy

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Graduating CS major, and am so glad i found out about this site.
 

grettlin2

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Originally posted by RaiderNation
What about Foreign Language???

Is it belonged to literature? :)

I graduated with Computer Science major. I am so happy to see the diverse background people here.
 

preludexl

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Originally posted by grettlin2
So now, you are going to apply or you have been accepted to dental schools. What is your undergraduate major?
What's yours? Mine was cell/molec bio with chem minor. If I'd have to do it again, I'd choose history, lit, or prob comp sci. I love computers and strongly believe that they will change the dental environment in the next 15 years.
 

Balki

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Mine is Biochem, an awesome major except for one class: BioPhysical Chemistry - it's so sad to do quantom physics on proteins. Other than that Biochem is very interesting.
 
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grettlin2

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Originally posted by preludexl
What's yours? .......

My major is computer science. I would look for research opportunity about dentistry + computer science while I am in the dental school.
 

politicallyRite

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computer science is very useful, especially in Dental Informatics.
here is just a few:
-computer-based oral health records (database)
-internet applications in dentistry
-educaitonal software in dentistry
-clinical diagnostic and therapeutic computer applications
-3D imaging
 

MINI430

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Hey Grettlin2,

Biomedical engineering is more like a combination of Electrical Engineering, Computer Eng., and Biology classes. It's very medical instrumentation oriented, which is great for people that want a good understanding on how medical devices work. I personally enjoyed the major and look forward to dentistry:( So many cools toys to play with!
 

preludexl

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Originally posted by grettlin2
My major is computer science. I would look for research opportunity about dentistry + computer science while I am in the dental school.
Well I'm sure you will make a great contribution in the field. Everyone is jumping into the biotech bandwagon. I hope dentistry recognizes the greater and more immediate impact of CAD.
 

miravyn

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HI! I'm new here. I'm currently a second year at UCLA. My major is Biochemistry with a possible minor in Anthropology.

This is off topic but can someone tell me what PBL is...I was reading about that in the dental school interview comments.
 

The Musketeer

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PBL = Problem Based Learning

Can't believe this method of learning originated from my university!

Well, here is a brief description of it:

PBL is defined as learning initiated through problem
investigation rather than through lectures that precede the
application and integration of knowledge.

In PBL the problem comes first and is the vehicle for
learning.

PBL is student-centred such that students define the
problem and establish the learning objectives necessary to
understand the problem in greater depth, in contrast to
case-based education, in which the learning objectives are
presented prior to a problem-solving activity.

PBL is based on small groups of students working
together in a cooperative environment to integrate across
disciplines to accomplish understanding.

What is PBL?
Problem-based Learning: PBL is any learning environment in which the problem drives the learning. That is, before students learn some knowledge they are given a problem. The problem is posed so that the students discover that they need to learn some new knowledge before they can solve the problem. Some example problem-based learning environments include:

?research projects

?engineering design projects that are more than a synthesis of previously learned knowledge

The traditional and well-known "Case approach", popular with business schools, may or may not be problem-based learning. Often the case is used to integrate previously-learned knowledge and hence would not be, according to this definition, problem-based learning.

? What's the big deal about PBL? Posing the problem before learning tends to motivate students. They know why they are learning the new knowledge. Learning in the context of the need-to-solve-a-problem also tends to store the knowledge in memory patterns that facilitate later recall for solving problems.

? What skills should a student have before entering a PBL program? They should be skilled at problem solving because that skill in needed as the students try to solve the problem.

? Does using PBL develop problem solving skills? Not without explicit interventions on the part of the teacher. PBL offers an opportunity to develop the skills

? Is PBL an example of cooperative learning? It depends. If the PBL is an individual project, then it does not require cooperation with others.

? Why does there seem to be so much confusion about what is and what is not PBL? Problem-based learning, learning because you need to solve a problem, has been around for centuries. Indeed, in the stone age, people learned skills and approaches to solve problems to survive. They just didn't say to each other "Hey, you are using PBL." Similarly, I suggest that all research is PBL, although we don't call it that, we call it research. In the 1960s McMaster Medical School introduced a learning environment that was a combination of small group, cooperative, self-directed, interdependent, self-assessed PBL. Since then this approach has been called "PBL". But PBL, as I suggested previously, can be in any form where a problem is posed to drive the learning. To overcome the confusion, I suggest we use the awkward terminology of small group, self-directed, self-assessed PBL when referring to learning environments similar to the McMaster Medical school approach.

Small group, self-directed, self-assessed PBL is a use of problem-based learning which embodies most of the principles known to improve learning. This learning environment is active, cooperative, self-assessed, provides prompt feedback, allows a better opportunity to account for personal learning preferences and is highly effective.

? If small group, self-directed, self-assessed PBL is so great for learning, why isn't everyone doing it? Probably, because of fear of the unknown and resources. Using this approach requires that teachers change. Change is not easy. This change, in particular, expects teachers to change their role from being the center of attention and the source of all knowledge to being the coach and facilitator of the acquisition of that knowledge. The learning becomes student-centered, not teacher-centered. For resources, the McMaster medical school model includes a tutor/teacher with each group. The groups are tutored. Hence, there is one teacher for every group of five or six students. This is resource intensive if you do this for only one course. This approach is not so resource intensive ifthe whole program is changed to this format. But what if you want to try small group, self-directed, self-assessed PBL as part of your course? or for only one course in your departmental program? Now, one is faced with classes of 30 to 200 with only one instructor.

? How can we use this medical school model with only one instructor with large classes of 30 to 300? One answer is to use tutorless groups. Here we provide the students with the training we give to tutors; we empower the student groups to be autonomous and accountable, with the tutor's role being to monitor and hold the individuals and groups accountable for their learning.



PBL and Problem Solving
Problem solving is the process used to solve a problem. Since problem-based learning starts with a problem so be solved, students working in a PBL environment should be skilled in problem solving or critical thinking or "thinking on your feet" (as opposed to rote recall). How is this handled? In research programs, we usually have qualifying examinations in which we test the problem solving (thinking skills) of the candidates before they are admitted. In the McMaster Medical school, one of five criteria for admission is a test of the candidates problem solving skills. Regrettably, some teachers embark on PBL without either prescreening or developing their students skill in problem solving.

Doesn't putting students in a PBL environment develop their problem solving skills? Regrettably no. Giving students an opportunity to solve problems rarely develops their skill in problem solving.

Can you have problem solving skill development without using PBL? Sure. We have lots of examples. Conventionally, students learn the material in Chapter 5 of a text, and then use problem solving to solve the homework problems. Here students are using problem solving skills in a "subject-based" learning environment compared with a problem-based learning environment.

If you want more information, check out this site:

http://chemeng.mcmaster.ca/pbl/pbl.htm
 

grettlin2

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Hi Musketeer. Thanks for giving us the detail look about PBL. I really need it. :thumbup:
 

grettlin2

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Based on 83 votes, there are about 60% Bio related major and 40% other majors. It really surprises me. Before I decided to switch my career, at that time, I thought all med or dental students must major in Bio. Now, i can see another non-bio major group of people.

It does encourage people from diverse backgrounds devoting into the dentistry. :clap:
 
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