• A new admissions hurdle is becoming more common: the CASPer test. Learn more about it at a free webinar hosted by SDN and PrepMatch on May 6th. Register now!
Aug 7, 2020
25
31
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I have a cat, who I love more than anything, but I'm worried that she might mess up my virtual interview. I have been taking virtual classes and she has, for the most part, left me alone besides meowing randomly or asking to be pet. She mostly sleeps. However, if I leave her in the living room and close the door, she freaks out. Scratching, crying, meowing, knocking things over. Just being an overall distraction. My roommate said I can leave my cat in her bedroom, but I'm worried she might make a mess and I don't want to be responsible if she broke something that belongs to my roommate.

I'm sure a lot of people with pets have already conducted interviews so what did you do? Did everything go okay if you left your pet (dog or cat or bird, etc) in your room? Or did you have to leave them outside? Did your interviewers seem to care if your pet interrupted either by showing up or barking/making noise? I really want this interview to go well and I don't want to create trouble if I can avoid it.
 
Mar 1, 2020
422
324
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I'd just leave it in another room. Maybe you can put her in one of those travel carriers. The interview is maybe 1-2 hours, so no big deal. Don't risk it, trust me, an animal can behave perfectly for your entire life, then the hour of your interview, it decides to mix things up. Or maybe leave it with your mom or sibling if possible.
 
Aug 16, 2019
181
255
If I was and adcom and saw a cat I would give you a bonus point (two if it is a caracal but not every states permits them), I just love cats way too much...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 6 users
About the Ads

QuizzicalApe

10+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2010
814
397
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
I'd just leave it in another room. Maybe you can put her in one of those travel carriers. The interview is maybe 1-2 hours, so no big deal. Don't risk it, trust me, an animal can behave perfectly for your entire life, then the hour of your interview, it decides to mix things up. Or maybe leave it with your mom or sibling if possible.

Agreed.

You also don't want to run the risk that the cat saunters into view and is just way too impressive to the interviewer. Can you imagine the stress in your home if the cat was accepted to med school but you weren't?
 
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: 12 users
Aug 16, 2019
181
255
Agreed.

You also don't want to run the risk that the cat saunters into view and is just way too impressive to the interviewer. Can you imagine the stress in your home if the cat was accepted to med school but you weren't?
I didn't choose medicine, medicine chose me
cat-doctor-crop.jpg
 
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: 11 users
Jul 17, 2020
55
264
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I have a cat, who I love more than anything, but I'm worried that she might mess up my virtual interview. I have been taking virtual classes and she has, for the most part, left me alone besides meowing randomly or asking to be pet. She mostly sleeps. However, if I leave her in the living room and close the door, she freaks out. Scratching, crying, meowing, knocking things over. Just being an overall distraction. My roommate said I can leave my cat in her bedroom, but I'm worried she might make a mess and I don't want to be responsible if she broke something that belongs to my roommate.

I'm sure a lot of people with pets have already conducted interviews so what did you do? Did everything go okay if you left your pet (dog or cat or bird, etc) in your room? Or did you have to leave them outside? Did your interviewers seem to care if your pet interrupted either by showing up or barking/making noise? I really want this interview to go well and I don't want to create trouble if I can avoid it.
This happened to an applicant I helped interview last week. It made both me and my co-interviewer laugh (in a good way).

To be frank, if I was an applicant and one of my animals came into view and the interviewers took it poorly, I wouldn't want to go to that school (I know it's easy to say that now). If you are truly worried about it, throw some nip or a few snacks in your bedroom and let kitty have 30 minutes of private time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

thumbz

Crazy Canuck
10+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2010
586
1,115
South of the 49th
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
We have to go through implicit bias training for the onslaught of virtual interviews and this is legit one of the modules. They remind us that not everyone has the same social situation and can’t control their environment and to not let that influence us. They use examples like being able to hear kids, see pets, hear upstairs neighbors, or even applicants who have to interview in their cars or public spaces to get reliable internet.
So don’t worry about Dr. Whiskers, she isn’t going to keep you out of med school.
 
  • Like
  • Love
  • Wow
Reactions: 14 users
Aug 7, 2020
25
31
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Agreed.

You also don't want to run the risk that the cat saunters into view and is just way too impressive to the interviewer. Can you imagine the stress in your home if the cat was accepted to med school but you weren't?

Why is this a legitimate fear of mine? I can imagine it now, I get an acceptance letter but it's titled to my cat.

Big thanks to everyone for the helpful and humorous responses, I really appreciate it. It's been a stressful couple of days and I legit started tearing up because everyone is so nice. Thank you so much and good to luck to everyone applying!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

Goro

SDN Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2010
64,987
99,867
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
If I was and adcom and saw a cat I would give you a bonus point (two if it is a caracal but not every states permits them), I just love cats way too much...
Hell, OP, I'd accept you!

Don't feed the cat in the AM, or if you do, give it 1/4 of what you normally feed it.

Then right before the interview, give it a can of nice wet cat food. That should keep her busy. After she finishes, she'll be busy grooming herself.
 
  • Like
  • Care
Reactions: 11 users
Mar 1, 2020
422
324
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Hell, OP, I'd accept you!

Don't feed the cat in the AM, or if you do, give it 1/4 of what you normally feed it.

Then right before the interview, give it a can of nice wet cat food. That should keep her busy. After she finishes, she'll be busy grooming herself.

Goro what happened to your dinosaur avatar?
 

biobukowski

MD/PhD
10+ Year Member
Oct 12, 2007
99
118
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
I have a cat, who I love more than anything, but I'm worried that she might mess up my virtual interview. I have been taking virtual classes and she has, for the most part, left me alone besides meowing randomly or asking to be pet. She mostly sleeps. However, if I leave her in the living room and close the door, she freaks out. Scratching, crying, meowing, knocking things over. Just being an overall distraction. My roommate said I can leave my cat in her bedroom, but I'm worried she might make a mess and I don't want to be responsible if she broke something that belongs to my roommate.

I'm sure a lot of people with pets have already conducted interviews so what did you do? Did everything go okay if you left your pet (dog or cat or bird, etc) in your room? Or did you have to leave them outside? Did your interviewers seem to care if your pet interrupted either by showing up or barking/making noise? I really want this interview to go well and I don't want to create trouble if I can avoid it.

I am interviewing for fellowships. My 6mo Boston Terrier Louie knows not to go inside my bedroom, but he will stand in the doorway, open the door slightly, and start whimpering/throwing toys inside the room. Every now and then an interviewer has noticed the puppy sounds and I tell them the truth. I think Louie has given me points, especially if I show him to the zoom crowds.

I would agree that if a program has someone who views your pet negatively, then don’t worry about it. It’s your familiar, and we are in special circumstances.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Doctor-S

Grand Rounds Clinical & Research
2+ Year Member
Jun 9, 2016
2,218
5,521
I have a cat, who I love more than anything, but I'm worried that she might mess up my virtual interview. I have been taking virtual classes and she has, for the most part, left me alone besides meowing randomly or asking to be pet. She mostly sleeps. However, if I leave her in the living room and close the door, she freaks out. Scratching, crying, meowing, knocking things over. Just being an overall distraction. My roommate said I can leave my cat in her bedroom, but I'm worried she might make a mess and I don't want to be responsible if she broke something that belongs to my roommate.

I'm sure a lot of people with pets have already conducted interviews so what did you do? Did everything go okay if you left your pet (dog or cat or bird, etc) in your room? Or did you have to leave them outside? Did your interviewers seem to care if your pet interrupted either by showing up or barking/making noise? I really want this interview to go well and I don't want to create trouble if I can avoid it.
I didn't want to "meow-out" myself on SDN ... but might as well tell you right now:

I ... AM ... your interviewer ... and you'll be fine.

catmed.jpg
 
  • Love
Reactions: 2 users
About the Ads
D

deleted988749

I can imagine people renting cats or dogs and intentionally have them show up at their interview to look personal. This American animal loving culture is really bizarre to me.
 
Aug 16, 2019
181
255
I can imagine people renting cats or dogs and intentionally have them show up at their interview to look personal. This American animal loving culture is really bizarre to me.
Not just American, rest assured people in the rest of the world also love animals
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

ciestar

All grown up!
7+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2013
8,007
11,199
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Other countries respect their animals. Many Americans love their animals more than their partners lol
Hey, my cat doesnt need to be told over and over to put his clothes in the hamper or put the toilet seat down
 
  • Like
  • Love
  • Haha
Reactions: 3 users
Aug 16, 2019
181
255
I never understood having cats as pets. Dogs are popular in all the countries.
Historically it was to protect food storages from mice and people from other rodents who could spread diseases. Today it’s just fancy because many people find them cute. What I really don’t understand is why some people have spiders.
 
  • Haha
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Ihave Nonamè

2+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2017
198
62
Lmao the interviewer positively distracted by the cat through the entirety of the interview can only work in your favor. "I wonder what type of cat that was. He looked like he would get along well with my cats... Oh no, I've done it again. I didn't hear a thing that the poor girl said. Well, I suppose as that was my fault, I better just indicate that I liked her...Anyway, a yellow bow would look just handsome on him."
 
Last edited:

Rachapkis

2+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2018
726
1,385
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
My dogs are great, but they have a different conception of manners than most humans. My big guy, laying in his usual position in the background, farted so loudly on a recent work call that it felt like an earthquake. If you need humor during your interview, please be advised that I rent the Philly Slobber Dogs by the hour. I should warn potential renters, however, that the emanations that come from these dogs may peel the paint on your walls and your clothes will never be the same.
 

Attachments

  • E1C28610-3BED-42FB-AEDF-29A12F71031B.jpeg
    E1C28610-3BED-42FB-AEDF-29A12F71031B.jpeg
    194.7 KB · Views: 13
Last edited:
  • Haha
Reactions: 1 user

QuizzicalApe

10+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2010
814
397
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Historically it was to protect food storages from mice and people from other rodents who could spread diseases. Today it’s just fancy because many people find them cute. What I really don’t understand is why some people have spiders.

Presumably to protect a corner of their house from flies
 

MedSchoolTutors

Top MCAT/USMLE/COMLEX Tutors Answer Your Questions
Vendor
Apr 25, 2019
1,298
1,229
www.medschooltutors.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
  2. Resident [Any Field]
  3. Attending Physician
I wouldn't spend 'too' much time worrying about it. Obviously do your best to not make it a distraction, but your virtual interviewer likely has pets, kids and the same problem. A short cameo from a furry friend might even be endearing. We're hard wired to find animal lovers as good people.

David D, MD - USMLE and MCAT Tutor
Med School Tutors
 
About the Ads

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.