whats the difference btw DO and MD EM residencies?

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alimarie81

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I'll be an MS1 DO student in the fall and am interested in EM. What is the difference between a DO and MD EM residency? Do they teach differently? I live in Chicago and have plenty of hospitals in the area with major trauma centers. Why should I look at a DO vs. an MD residency in EM? Thanks
 

*Wing of Zock*

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AM81,

I'm probably not the best to answer this question, but to be honest I have seen no difference in the MD vs DO graduates of EM residencies.

Bottom line--In your third and fourth year rotate at as many differeny EM residencies as you can and regardless of MD or DO--go with programs that you'll fit in with the best and be happiest at.

I think most DO ER residencies are 4 years, or 1+3 with an internship, but I'd just go with where you'll be happy and you'll do fine.

Until then enjoy school--it gets easier--and have as much fun as you can.

Also you can probably run a search on SDN of "MD vs DO" and get a zillion responses to this question.

Wing
 

alimarie81

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Wing-
Thanks for the advice. I am thinking that I'll have more luck with MD EM residencies in Chicago than DO. There is only 1 DO EM rotation that I know of in Chicago. (At St. James Hospital in Olympia Fields).
Thanks

Alimarie81
 

Midwest Medic

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I rotated in both (2 MD and 1 DO), and found them to be both good at certain things. It seemed at the osteopathic program, it was more learn by doing things. The didactics were a lot less than what the allopathic programs were, but you got to do a lot more. The attendings would always call me over to do procedures, and actually did when I was on off service rotations too. There are not as many residents at the osteopathic programs either, which means it is usually you and the attending working, so you get to see more of the interesting cases. The MD programs had way better didactics, MUCH better didactics. I never had as many procedures as a student (but I am sure this would change as a resident). There were usually more residents working per shift, so you didn't have as much one-on-one teaching, and you had to "share" the interesting cases more.

It mainly depends on what your learning style is on what you decide to do. If you are very motivated to read, learn by seeing things, and don't want to go into academics, then the DO route would be just fine. If you really like great didactics or want to go on for a fellowship/academics, then an osteopathic program probably isn't the best choice.

I doubt that I wil ever want to go into academics, and research is as far away from anything I ever want to do, so I am going into an osteopathic program. It suited my learning stlye the best, and seemed right for me.

Anyone else have other thoughts on this??
 

alimarie81

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Midwest Medic-
What made you go into EM in the first place? What factors played a role in your decision?
Also if you are from the midwest, what DO EM programs did you look at?
 

Midwest Medic

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I worked as a paramedic for a few years before going to med school, so I pretty much knew that I was going into EM. As for programs, I looked at most of the MD programs in the midwest (IA, MN, OH, IL, MO, WI) and just MI for the osteopathic programs. I interviewed at 4 MD programs before canceling most of mine after I was given a verbal agreement at a DO program. I liked most of the MD places, and would have been happy there, but just was tired of the stress of matching and all that and was very happy with the DO spot I got.
 

alimarie81

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So, if you are doing your DO EM residency in MI, does that mean you have an internship year, and then 3 years of residency, meaning a 1+3 =4 situation?
 

kungfufishing

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One thing I would mention.

My experience with DO EM is also that there is an emphasis on "learn by doing" vs. didactic education. This in itself is not necessarily a bad thing. However, pick your program carefully. Lots of DO spots have a much lower volume than their MD counterparts. This only becomes especially problematic if the residency doesnt place much emphasis on didactics - you'll be reading less AND seeing a lower volume patients/variety of pathology.
 

DrQuinn

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I am a DO who decided to do the allopathic tract (as well as several of my colleagues on this site). There is also an M4 from CCOM who matched into the DO EM program, you should search the EM threads for his posts. Perhaps he'll show up.

DO EM programs are 4 years (maybe more if I recall). Most MD EM programs are 3 years. That one year might make a difference, and i do believe that both graduates have roughly the same training after all is said and done.

Q, DO
 

DocWagner

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This brings about strong feelings by many.

After doing much research and rotating at MD and DO EM programs, I simply felt that MD programs were simply better...in didactics, academics, departmental status, dedicated teaching faculty, research opportunities, pathology, and were held to higher accredidation standards (the ACGME RRC in EM standards are MUCH higher). Allopathic residencies held the structure that I personally desired. That says nothing of the quality of the residents, as I have rotated with fantastic residents from DO programs.

I will be entering into my 3rd year very soon, knowing that my program has trained me well. For me, this was the best way to go...structure and track record.
That is NOT to say I am not proud of my DO heritage. Rather, I wish the AOA was more selective in granting EM programs accredidation...and I wish the AOA was more open to DUAL programs...that is the ultimate solution to quality.

I wish all of you the best of luck.
 
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