romoxx23

CanDoIt12
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Mar 30, 2012
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I know this isn't the most accurate place to post this but i'd like some insight nonetheless.

I am deciding between 2 schools (a newly accredited one... Utah) vs. an older established school (Iowa).

Both were great when I interviewed, and price isn't so different for me. But will going to a newer school shut down my option to possibly specialize in the future?
 
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Aug 7, 2011
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If everything is pretty much the same I'd just go with the more established school. Especially if you're planning to specialize. Can't hurt to go to a school with more prestige eh?
 
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romoxx23

CanDoIt12
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Mar 30, 2012
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Yea I just feel like being part of a newer school will help me gain other experiences as well that I may not gain at an established school otherwise.
 
Oct 2, 2013
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Dental Student
I'd go with Iowa. They're very, very good school and have been for a long time.
 

Jbrowndds

SMILE ON!!!
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Oct 31, 2012
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The cheapest one.
 

CleverThought

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Don't forget, Iowa is the only school that has EVERY.SINGLE specialty in its college. That's a huge advantage if you're considering specializing
 
Jul 3, 2013
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If you want to be a general dentist, go for Utah. If you think you may want to specialize, Iowa would be better in the long run. I got nervous about Utah when my interviewers at other schools didn't speak too highly of it and when I heard they basically have Creighton's curriculum. It will be a good school in the future, but the schools you apply for in residency will likely be seeing the Utah dental name for the first time.
 

drake6

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Feb 1, 2012
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Bias alert: I attend the University of Utah.

I've heard GREAT things about Iowa's program, so I'm not here to knock them. They have a solid reputation, and if cost/location are not major considerations, I think that would be a wise choice. Especially if you are contemplating specialization.

That being said, hopefully I can clear up some of your concerns about choosing Utah.

First: The last thing we're worried about is having a lack of patients. We have a class size of 20 students, which means realistically we'll be needing less than a fourth the patient pool of most schools. We're located literally minutes from downtown Salt Lake and the U already has a prestigious medical school/university hospital/reputation from which to draw.

Second: adoo2, I'm not sure where you heard the curriculum was going to be modeled after Creighton's (which I actually wouldn't mind- I have several friends who have/are attending Creighton and they've LOVED it). In October, administrators from Midwestern, Roseman, Michigan, and NYU visited our school to present on their respective programs. We are currently in the process of picking our favorite elements from each model and integrating them into our curriculum. Students have been intimately involved in this process-- which is a major responsibility and sometimes a pain in the neck. If you just want to breeze through school and not deal with some of the exciting challenges that come with building a new school, I would recommend you look elsewhere (i.e. Iowa).

Ultimately I am loving my experience at Utah. It's only been a semester, but I have complete faith that I will come out of this a competent dentist. The small class size is convenient and being involved in making many of the decisions that will dictate the future of the school has been a joy.

And those mountains.
 

slm266

Dentist
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Nov 5, 2008
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There's nothing more frustrating in dental school than kinks in the system. Whether it's faculty being on the same page, or not enough faculty, or the computer system is down, or the servers for the radiographs aren't working and you can't pull up your X-rays, ...

They're things that you just don't have time for and they come at the worst possible time. Being a part of a brand new dental school makes me think of the launching of healthcare.gov
It'd be awesome if it works great from the start, but few complicated systems ever do.

Looking back at dental school I really don't think you're going to remember "man wasn't that cool how it was new and I got to be a part of the launch?" You're gonna be fresh out of school at that first job with your livelihood on the line thinking "did dental school prepare me for this?"