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Why D.O. instead of an MD

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by DarkChild, Jul 26, 2002.

  1. DarkChild

    DarkChild Senior Member

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    Not trying to strart a flame war or anything - but why do people choose to do a D.O?
    I dont think I've actually met a practicing D.O., but I do know a couple people who went into an osteopath school because they couldnt get into an MD program.
    Do D.O.s only practice, or are there research opportunities also available for them. And are there specifically osteopathic residencies - and if so where? where do D.Os practice? do they tend to be more rural practices.
    oh and are there D.O surgeons?
    I dont know, I'm just confused
     
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  3. Doctor Octopus

    Doctor Octopus Hospitalist

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    I know an orthopedic surgeon who is a D.O. He's in Columbus right now doing a fellowship. Also, the Cleveland Indians team physician is an orthopod D.O.
     
  4. knish

    knish SUNY Buffalo 2006

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    this is def. going to start a flame war.....although i can't really answer your question here is a link to a related thread click here

    knish
     
  5. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    For as many different reasons as people go into medicine in the first place - they like OMM, they believe the "philosophy" really makes a difference, the school is conveniently located for their other interests, they have a mentor that was a D.O., etc etc etc etc

    Yep, and thats another reason. And then there are a few people who apply exclusievly to DO or turn down MD school offers in preference for DO. Mileage varies.

    DO schools tend to focus on primary care, but DOs are in every specialty and yes, do research too, at both DO and MD schools. Some DO schools have joint DO-PhD programs.

    Yes, there are specifically DO residencies, but DOs also do MD (ACGME) residencies in all specialties.

    Some schools emphasize rural care, just as some MD schools do. DOs can practice anywhere they like.

    Yes, there are DO surgeons, that have been through DO or MD residencies.
     
  6. Ryo-Ohki

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    VERY few people turn down MD schools to go to DO schools.

    I just wanted to stress the 'VERY' part.
     
  7. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    This is a pointless post.

    Sorry, just wanted to stress the pointless part...
     
  8. poloace

    poloace Senior Member

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    why was the DO philosophy created... and when? and i agree- those that go to do DOs are (on the majority) individuals who want to practice medicine but could not get into an MD program. find me one DO who did it without wanting an MD and i'll shut up.
    p
     
  9. dr kevin40

    dr kevin40 Senior Member

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    y? cuz they can't get into md programs and weren't able to start their own md credited medical school.
     
  10. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    Actually the founder of the DO approach to medicine was named A.T. Still, and yes, he was an M.D.. I guess therefore, your theory is wrong.
     
  11. poloace

    poloace Senior Member

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    dude-
    we all know that no one was never named 'A.T.'
    seriously though, where do you find info on the background on the D.O. program? just curious-
    p
     
  12. oldman

    oldman Senior Citizen
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  13. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    www.aacom.org

    this is the equivalent of AAMC for DO. It also has links to the individual schools which contain more information on specific programs.

    There is also a link to a page about osteopathic medicine on the bottom half of this web pages homwpage www.studentdoctor.net/do/index.asp
     
  14. Dr/\/\om

    Dr/\/\om Senior Member

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    I chose to only apply to DO. My state has a DO and an MD school with similar tuitions, entrance requirements, etc and I didn't want to apply to the MD school. I definitely would have been competitive at most MD schools, so that wasn't my reason at all. I preferred the emphasis on primary care, preventive medicine, and the different attitude (less of the *high horse*) I found from DOs. (certainly, there are exceptions both ways) I also like having the option of using OMM. I have been extremely pleased with the care I have gotten from DOs.

    Obviously I could have gotten the things I listed above from an MD school, but they are the core of my DO school.

    BTW: where do you get the idea that the majority of DOs are DOs b/c they didn't get into an MD program? I haven't found that to be the case at all. Almost every DO I know didn't settle for DO, they chose to become DOs over the MD route.

    Thanks boy wonder for your post!

    For those of you wanting info on DOs in general and AT Still here's some info
    http://www.aoa-net.org/Consumers/whatdo01.htm

    There are also some threads on the osteo and pre-osteo forums that list some books on the history of osteopathy.
     
  15. oldman

    oldman Senior Citizen
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    ha i beat you! :)

     
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  17. Dr/\/\om

    Dr/\/\om Senior Member

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    :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :p
     
  18. futrfysician

    futrfysician Senior Member

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    I personally know 4 who turned down MD schools to go to DO schools they liked better. You can shut up now you ignorant little twit.
     
  19. poloace

    poloace Senior Member

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    i don't believe people turn down DOs for MDs... but sure, i'd tell you that i turned down a DO if i didn't get into an MD. listen, i'm not criticizing the DO route. i'm a public health student who is BIG on preventive medicine, i just don't want to do the DO thing... but- here's a great t-shirt idea. i'm going to make it and you'll be able to buy it next year. it should be copyrighted soon... but, anyway-
    its like the mountain dew ad:

    do the DO

    ha. i'm rad.
    p
     
  20. Dr/\/\om

    Dr/\/\om Senior Member

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    Ha! Neither do I!
     
  21. poloace

    poloace Senior Member

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    ahh. DAMN YOU!!!!!!!!!!-
    you know what i meant.
     
  22. Rumit

    Rumit Senior Member

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    poloace:

    Your argument is completely ignorant. I have two friends who both decided to go to DO schools. One only applied to DO schools because he prefferred their philosophy. The other friend was accepted to a number of MD schools but after interviewing at the DO schools decided he liked them better.

    Considering that all of us who go to MD schools will be interacting with many DO's once we begin our practice I would suggest that you learn what they are about and show a little more respect to the people who have chosen to go that route.

    Adam
     
  23. vixen

    vixen I like members

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    :clap: Nicely put Adam!!! :clap:
     
  24. Dr/\/\om

    Dr/\/\om Senior Member

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    Poloace-

    You asked for examples of people who chose DO over MD, we give you multiple examples, and then you say that you don't believe it! :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    I hope your attitude changes before you actually become a physician!
     
  25. Femtochemistry

    Femtochemistry Skunk Works

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    :rolleyes: :rolleyes: +pissed+
     
  26. DarkChild

    DarkChild Senior Member

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    hmmm... I took a look at the AACOM site - its pretty informative.
    but can anyone tell me what shortcomings in allopathic medicine that osteopathic medicine is supposed to address.
     
  27. rjhtamu

    rjhtamu Stargazer Royale

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    I actually know several people who have chosen DO schools over MD schools. Most people believe now that they actually offer the most complete standard of care.
     
  28. Dr/\/\om

    Dr/\/\om Senior Member

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    I don't know that most DOs would use the term "shortcomings," but being a DO gives you the training to use OMM. Also, most DOs are trained to *try other things first* rather than immediately jump at meds or surgery. Obviously there are DOs that don't practice like this and MDs that do, so the line is rather blurred.

    As an example of the *try other things first*: my dad has 3 types of arthritis and a heart condition. The MDs that he used to see kept adding Rx after Rx (their only answer to his pain and other problems). All of the meds actually made him sick (he ended up with Barretts esophagus from the damage they did). He changed to a DO who took him off of most of his meds. My dad felt so much better and discovered that he didn't really need all of the drugs. Sure he takes some, but significantly fewer.

    Again, there are MDs whose practices look like DO ones and DOs that look like MD practices. Is one better than the other? I doubt it because they each have their shortcomings. But they are both valid and almost identical forms of medical training.
     
  29. moo

    moo 1K Member

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    Although I think DOs are competent physicians (in fact, I am choosing a DO to be my primary care physician once I get to the US) there are SOME aspects of osteopathic principles that many MDs find suspect. For example, there is no evidence that craniosacral therapy works, but it is still being taught in DO schools. I think this is the kind of stuff that MDs (i.e., those that have a "problem" with DOs) look down upon. And yes, there are plenty of people who choose DO over MD. One can say they're more secure with themselves than those who choose to, say, go to a Caribbean MD school.
     
  30. Pursuing MD

    Pursuing MD Senior Member

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    What do you mean by this, moo? Caribbean medical schools educate prospective physicians as well as (most) U.S. medical schools.
     
  31. moo

    moo 1K Member

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    I mean that those that go Carib MD over DO might do so because they don't want the "stigma" of being a DO. It is easier to hide the fact that they are a carib "MD" than a "DO." If they've got self image problems they might feel that telling people they are an MD (albeit a carib MD but they don't need to mention that) rather than a DO will boost their own self image.
     
  32. Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003]

    Spiderman [RNA Ladder 2003] Platinum Member

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    Most of people who go DO do not have numbers good enough to go MD. There are exceptions of course.
     
  33. 8744

    8744 Guest

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    Not to mention that the "manipulative techniques" taught at DO schools are a throwback to the bad old days when doctors doubled as barbers.

    This alone has caused the Osteopathic schools to gain a somewhat disreputable image, seeing that the other folks who believe in manipulative techniques are chiropractors.

    It is true that DO students cover many of the same subjects taught to MD students. But what do they leave out so they can teach manipulation?

    Respectfully,

    P. Bear
    Medical Student Who Wouldn't Even Consider a DO School Because He Didn't Want to Spend His Whole Life ExplainingThat He is a Real Doctor Too
     
  34. FutureM.D.

    FutureM.D. Psychology major

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    First i would like to say that 'the boy wonder' knows exactly what he's talking about. I don't mean to sound rude when I say this, but I'm going to put it exactly how it is. D.O's are doctors just like an M.D. Anyone who dislikes D.O's would quite possibly change their minds(if they are not blinded by their own ignorance) when they actually RESEARCHED what a D.O is! To me a D.O is a definition of a REAL Dr. I hate drs that just hand out the meds and say " take twice daily, blah,blah,blah." of course I'm sure there are D.O's that do this just like ALMOST every M.D I've ever met. Stop looking at the title and realize it depends on the DOCTOR himself. Every dr. has a different personality and has a different philosophy for his practice. Of all the D.o's and M.D's I've meet and career shadowed, they practice medicine the same!! don't get osteopath and naturopath confused. And don't think osteopath is 'alternative medicine'. Just because a dr's a D.O doesn't mean he'll send you to an acupuncturist or say' go do yoga'. For example, i career shadowed a d.o for a day(a GP) he didn't precribe anything but prescriptions. My M.D on the other hand, suggested that I see an acupuncturist! I gave him the 'no way look', oh and he is very interested in natural medicine and even put me on a vitamin regime for headaches instead of giving me medication(it didn't work, but at least he didn't try to drug me up). I'm not attacking anyone, but you need to realize that it depends on the dr(as seen in my example). don't believe the false rumors people spread about D.O's. Be independent and do your OWN research. Many years ago a family member told me that D.O's were a cult and did crystal balls and everything, I was stupid and believed that until i actually SHADOWED one! I was young and stupid(and believed something ridiculous) but that's why I'm saying, 'find out for yourself' you don't even have to believe me if you don't want to. sorry this post is so long. I'm a gentle person but I can become very passionate about things. I hope this post is found useful by someone else that was 'blinded' and it will make them think about what they truely believe about medicine and will encourage someone to do some investigating on their own.:cool: :clap:
     
  35. FutureM.D.

    FutureM.D. Psychology major

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    also, even though my first choice school is allopathic, I'm also going to apply to osteopathic schools. No matter what school I go to(I don't care as long as it's a med school) I will ALWAYS keep the osteopathic philosophy in mind- "Treat the entire person, physically, mentally, and spiritually.":D :D :D
    panda bear: they don't leave out anything. The manipulative techniques are an additional 200 hours of training" This is exactly what I'm talking about. People don't research things so they don't know anything. They live their lives based on assumptions. I feel bad for them.(AND i AM NOT BEING SARCASTIC.) :(
     
  36. Noeljan

    Noeljan Senior Member

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    Hey there
    I just wanted to say it's hurtful when people make such assumptions about D.O. applicants/students. I am strongly considering applying to NYCOM, and I can promise you my stats would beat many, many pre-M.D.'s. I have had many people tell me I should apply to such and such schools, etc. But i know deep down what I want to do.
    I'm not saying there are not people who apply to both, or don't get in or whatever. but I know someone with a 2.5 who is in the Carr. now and will be an M.D.(well if he passes) now I have above a 3.5 and may become a D.O. I just think it's really rude for people to insist that everyone who goes D.O. could not get into M.D.
    Also, what about the lower tier M.D. schools that have Ave GPA's of 3.2-3.4???????? Quite a few DO schools top that, so how do you explain that??? Oh I'm sorry some people do not live in states where they have such low GPA's to go to.
    Well I am doing an internship right now for nursing in a hopsital and there are both DO's and MD's and they are both on equal footing.
    Why do people care anyway? If you don't want to be a DO fine, leave DO's alone. If you don't want to be an MD fine, leave MD's alone. But respect eachother, bc in the end you will be doing similiar tasks.
     
  37. knish

    knish SUNY Buffalo 2006

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    darkchild
    this is from the original post.....

    knish
    don't say....i told you so.....

    by the way....futureMD....i am totally with you....

    knish
     
  38. FutureM.D.

    FutureM.D. Psychology major

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    Thanks knish. at least I know I'm not crazy!! ;)

    That's the way to say it!!:D
     
  39. Ryo-Ohki

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    Yes, there is a purpose in saying that VERY few medical hopefuls choose DO schools exclusively over MD schools.

    I know there is an aspect of dissonance with the DO people, but the fact is DO schools are not as respected as MD schools for a reason. Don't mislead new hopefuls into thinking MD and DO schools are interchangeable.


    On a tangent, Caribbean MD schools are bad. Use them as a last...LAST(!) option. DO schools are better then these, IMHO.
     
  40. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    Okay - and this is going to be my final contribution to this particular thread.

    First of all, let's address the question "can anyone tell me what shortcomings in allopathic medicine that osteopathic medicine is supposed to address."

    To do that you need to look not at D.O.s and M.D.s today but D.O.s and M.D.s about 150 years ago. At that time many of the M.D.s used medicines that were unproven eg mercury for gonhorrea - completely ineffective, and actually poisonous. A.T. Still disagreed with this approach of using medicines and pills, which at that time had no clinical foundation and, after losing several close family members who he felt died in part due to the "care" they had received he founded osteopathic medicine. This did not use the clinically unproven medicines and was instead based on the interconnectedness of all systems in the body - Dr. Still recognized the body's ability to heal itself and stressed preventive medicine, eating properly, and keeping fit.

    Now, back to the present day. D.O. and M.D. practice regimes have converged over the years. Now the differences are laregly in the individuals rather than approach or philosophy.

    However, the original question seems to include some kind of attitude that D.O.s need to justify their existence to pre-MeDs. I have posted responses in answer to questions, but I have no interest in "justifying" my belief in D.O. to anyone (and I will point out that I read pre-allo because I am pre-allo - I am not a D.O).

    Some of the attitudes exhibited in this thread are extremely perplexing. Some people seem to believe that in medicine the white coated M.D. is some sort of omniscient 'God'. My experience of health care however has been that health care is a team effort. The P.A.s, nurses, M.D.'s and D.O.'s are co-workers. Some people seem to believe that D.O.s go off and practice in some other world, that they will never encounter them. Why don't you stop for a minute and take a look at the faculty listings of some of the top 50 M.D. schools. I have only three brochures on my desk here - Albert Einstein, U.Penn. and Mount Sinai. Did you know that every single one of these have D.O.s on their faculty? What are you going to do when you turn up on the ward and your attending is a D.O.? Wave your MCAT score in his or her face and be sure to speak slowly so they can understand you?

    At the end of the day, I want to be the kind of doctor who gives my patients the best care possible. If they have a problem I will use the most effective, least invasive means to help them. The New England Journal of Medicine has published papers about the efficacy of osteopathic techniques for things like low back pain. If I had a pateint with such a complaint I would of course refer them not only to a D.O. but a D.O. with a hopefully a residency in OMM. It works. Doing anything less would not be serving my patients to the best of my ability.

    Regarding craniosacral techniques which someone mentioned. It is true that such techniques are currently taught, and yet clinically unproven. However, the D.O. community is making rapid strides in providing a scientific basis for their techniques. They are establishing large research institutes specifically to address such questions and I am sure that as techniques are proven or disproven they will be added or removed from the curricula. At present the techniques certainly do no harm (the physicians mandate after all) as they are invariably used in conjunction with more "traditional approaches" not instead of them. However, how do you think allopathic approaches are discovered. We experiment on our patients. We might not like to put it that way, but it's the truth. We give them unproven drugs in clinical trials and to other people, suffering the same disease, we give placebos. If you want to worry about ethics, start at home.

    As far as people not believing that *anyone* would choose D.O. over M.D. I think you are making the mistake of assuming that just because you would never consider such a thing, no one else would. People are individuals. They do many different things for many different reasons, often quite beyond our own comprehension. I cannot understand why anyone would drive without a seat belt. However, a good friend of mine died doing this. I counsel pateints with HIV. Some of them don't take their medications. Some because they "can't remember", some because "taking a pill reminds them they are sick and they don't want to think about it" some because "they listen to their body and they just 'know' when they need the next pill", thus causing themselves to build resistance to the very pill that could have helped them. When an overweight patient comes to you for help, you may tell them "stop eating so much". Maybe for you that would be easy. Maybe for them, food is a substitute for other things in their lives and until you help them with those problems they will not stop abusing food. Or maybe they are 14 and the person you need to work with is the parents because the father insists on fried food every night and the mother cooks it to keep him happy, or or or or or the list goes on and on. You can't assume that everyone will make the same choices you would given the superficial details of their life, or you will be stymied in helping them. First you have to really listen to them and try and understand what the problems are behind the complaint. With one HIV client who didn't like taking pills because they reminded him he was sick, I got him to start a vitamin and mineral supplement regime. He took these at the same time as his pills. It shifted his focus from "sickness" to "health" as that is what he associated the vitamins with. A stupid 'trick' maybe, but that client is now compliant and *healthy*. One success - and all because I didn't just assume he took his pills just because I feel certain I would if I were sick.

    I guess, the summary is this - you're about to enter a *profession* and as *professionals* your job is to help - open your minds; grow up.
     
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  41. Noeljan

    Noeljan Senior Member

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    Hey Molly
    I have a question for you?
    What about when there was a time when M.D.'s were not so famous, and spirits were thought of as the main cause for disease???? New things emerge and develop with time.
     
  42. dkwyler94

    dkwyler94 Senior Member

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    As a current student at a DO school, I found the posts on this a little interesting. What I found most interesting was the lack of knowledge so many of the posters had.

    When I was considering MD and DO I finally decided it didn't matter to me what my initials were. I had worked in a hospital for several years and knew for the most part the only way to distinguish the MD v. DO was to see how they signed their names. Of course this was DOs and MDs who had specialized. In family practice one can tell the difference a bit more.

    Once I decided my initials didn't matter, and I could do anything I wanted in medicine regardless of my degree, I picked out the school that seemed the best fit for my personality and learning style. I could have gone MD but like the school (KCOM) that I am going to and don't regret that decission.

    Also, to the few of you who have criticized OMM, I would ask how much research you have done in it. Is your criticism based on reading the evidence and deciding it isn't sufficient or based on simple prejuidice.

    Being confident that you are all very intelligent individuals I am sure it is the first. As such I wonder what you consider of the article published in the Nov. 1998 JAMA on the use of OMM on backpain. It is one of the best known studies published, so I am sure you have come acrossed it in your readings.

    Also, consider this. Those of you who are going to be doctors, in many areas of the country you will find DOs and MDs work together as well as any other doctors. You might find yourself in a clerkship with a DO attending. You might find yourself in a residency with a DO director (yes, while not many there are ACGME accredited programs with DO directors). And likely if you make negative comments about DOs when you are interviewing or in your rotations you will find the MD your are addressing does not share your biases. While not completely, anti-DO settiments are becoming a thing of the past.

    In closing, if you are going to be doctors, you will be taught you can't make hasty judgements, but you need to collect data and make informed decisions. It is a good way to practice medicine and I would suggest a could way to live.

    Best of luck to you all (at least those of you who think before you act/speak) at getting into whichever medical school you find is the best fit for you.

    David
     
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  43. a few thoughts:

    it seems to me that the D.O. criticisms of M.D.'s are not much more fair than the M.D. criticisms of D.O.'s. I think both philosophies are fine. I personally don't agree that M.D.'s tend to be "pill pushers" as they are labelled on here. Also, giving drugs to a patient is a better idea than dwelling through all of the possible alternative treatments in some cases. For example, lithium is the appropriate treatment for my father's bipolar disorder; if he had not been given the right meds and had tried, say, OMM; I don't think he'd be alive today. Lithium pretty much saved his life.

    I personally chose to go allopathic instead of osteopathic because I had very little experience with the osteopathic profession and because I tend to prefer the urban/suburban location that most med schools are in. When I was getting ready to apply a third time and sitting on 6 MD waitlists; I started to apply osteopathic as well. I think that I would have enjoyed going to either type of school, but I enjoy Tufts much more than I would have enjoyed KCOM. Both are great schools, but I just don't see myself living and/or practicing 200 miles from the nearest large city as I would have done at KCOM. I also don't think I would have fit in at KCOM as many (more than half I've heard) of the students are married with children. Although I'm not a club hopper or anything, I do enjoy the nightlife, diverse student and patient population, and culture that the big city provides. Boston is a perfect match for me, and I think I would have enjoyed St. Louis as well if I had chosen SLU. So if you are the type of person who likes working with many different types of patients and enjoys urban areas, I would suggest applying to a few suburban osteopathic schools like NYCOM and TUCOM and going allopathic the rest of the way.

    A friend of mine from USUHS encountered a few DO students during her third year and told me that they seemed to have some serious gaps in their clinical knowledge compared to the MD students she was rotating with. This is just my friend's opinion, please don't get too offended or start calling us names. While I can't verify that what she says is true; I have to admit that there are probably a few gaps in the DO curriculum due to the fact that they have to fit 200 extra hours for OMM in. With all that we have to learn in med school, I think some of it must get pushed aside at some DO schools because of the time constraints. Some of these gaps (say 1 less lecture in enzyme kinetics) may be less serious than others (time cut out of a Physical Diagnosis class). And there are gaps in the allopathic curriculum too. Whether or not the gaps affect the MD or DO student depends on what type of setting they are working in.

    good luck to both types of applicants!:)
     
  44. Ischemia

    Ischemia Member

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    I posted a similar response to a similar topic a couple of days ago.

    Many of you express opinions to the effect that being a DO is bad or at least that it isn't as highly respected as is being an MD. What is most disconcerting about this is the insight it gives to your motivation for becoming a doctor. One should (ideally) want to be a physician to heal others, not to worry about the respect (or lack thereof, so you claim) that you will get from the other physicians or the lay community (unless this argument translates into a decreased compliance level from patients, which I doubt it does).

    Physicians no longer receive the same level of respect/prestige they once did. It is much more common today for people to question/challenge the opinions of doctors. In this light, which degree has more respect over the other is a useless discussion -- they both don't carry the same regard that they once did.

    What really matters anyway is the graduate training. Here, both types of degrees are mixed. What do two letters on the same white lab coat matter?
     
  45. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    I don't think anyone on here *has* criticized M.D.s. Maybe I missed the post you are referring to - most of the D.O. supportive posts that I have read have not bashed M.D.'s but instead said the type of doctor depends more on the individual than the degree letters...on the other hand the D.O. bashing has been unrelenting and, on the whole, uninformed. I think if people really wanted information on D.O. they would probably also ask the D.O. and pre-D.O. forums...

    As to your example that lithium is better than OMM for bipolar disorder I am at a loss to see the relevance of this. I don't know a single osteopathic doctor that WOULD use OMM to treat bipolar disorder. Do you??? If not it seems like a rather illogical and arbitrary argument. One could as well use the same logic to posit that "when my father entered ventricular tachicardia the doctor used a de-fibrillator to re-normalize his heart beat. That de-fibrillator saved his life, if someone had tried to use lithium on him he would be dead by now." What does that prove? The only thing it proves is that lithium isn't a good drug for people in v-tach. It doesn't mean lithium isn't good for bi-polar disorder any more than your example means OMM isn't good for low back pain. It's just irrelevant.
     
  46. 8744

    8744 Guest

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    If you remove the manipulative therapy from the D.O. curriculum, what you have left is a pretty typical M.D. curriculum taught with the assumption that most of the class will be going into primary care.

    Since manipulative therapy is three quarters hoax and one quarter unprovable, why bother with it at all?

    The assertion that D.O.s treat the "whole person" is probably true, but the corallary, that M.D.s don't, is untrue.

    I don't know how things were done in the past, but modern medical education stresses an integrative, team approach to treatment.
     
  47. FutureM.D.

    FutureM.D. Psychology major

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  48. vixen

    vixen I like members

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    I think this is the ONLY statement I will ever agree on w/Panda Bear.
     
  49. acurarte

    acurarte Member

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    You guys are arguing over a bunch of crap. I am a D.O. doing my surgical residency at an allopathic program. All of my colleagues are M.D.s here since I am the first D.O. in the program and I think there are for the most part exceptional surgeons here. There are a couple that lack in surgical or people skills just as I would expect at an instituion of all D.O.'s if I were to be the sole MD.

    Medical school is medical school. Robins (the main path text) is the same whether you study as an MD or DO, so why the argument.

    Yes we have some minor differences in our training during medical school with the majority of the difference falling on our OMM training ( there is an emphasis on treating the whole patient, however many allopathic institutions are emphaisizing it as well).

    I actually chose DO over OD (optometry school) (my father's trade) because I did not want to concentrate on one body system only. Believe it or not, I never even considered allopathic medical school. DO school felt right and the location was perfect, but who cares? I now practice medicine, surgery, and pray for a decent night's sleep.

    I am not intellectually deprived just because I have DO after my name and my MD colleagues are not insensitive pill pushers just because they are MDS.

    The initials behind your name DO NOT make you any better of a person nor do they make you a good doctor.

    I think that those obsessed with the thought of having certain intitials after their name and are in it for the power trip instead of for the privilege of being a healer, are the prostitutes of their profession.
     
  50. Dr/\/\om

    Dr/\/\om Senior Member

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    Katie:

    I'm assuming that you're responding to my post here:

    Please note that I was referring to a generalization, which I acknowledged in the 2nd paragraph. I certainly don't think that MDs are by definition "pill pushers," but there is a difference in emphasis of training that makes DOs less likely to try drugs first if there is a possible alternative available. (your lithium example is humorous as DOs would use lithium also) DOs prescribe drugs multiple times daily just like MDs, but at least they have some other tools available when appropriate.

    Again, these are generalizations and you will find DOs and MDs that practice alike (as most of them do). In real life practices, they really aren't significantly different.

    As far as your friend encountering poorly trained DOs on rotations: there are low-level MD students too. I'll be sure not to judge all MDs based on the few *slow* ones I've seen.

    I'm not trying to be inflammatory, just trying to make a point. I have absolutely no probelm with MDs or allopathic training.
     
  51. Ischemia

    Ischemia Member

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    This is the only post worth quoting in the entire thread. It's the only one that is intelligent (besides my previous one, of course).
     
  52. DarkChild

    DarkChild Senior Member

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    Thanks to everyone who posted here - Its definately given me a deeper appreciation of what D.Os do.
    And a lot of what the "D.O-supporters" (for want of a better phrase) resonated with some things I have feel about medicine. The most significant of these - and this is one of the things pushing me to medicine - is that I have serious misgivings about the way healthcare is delivered in the U.S. Too ofter - I know because this is happening to my mom - the symptoms get treated and not the patient. At the end of the day, I welcome the additional perspectives D.Os bring to the table.
     

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