Status
Not open for further replies.

cyclin M

megaman
10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2008
337
1
Bunker
Status
Pre-Medical
you dont see the ignorance in someone refusing to see a physician because he/she has a DO degree?
Yes I see that. I was asking about his ex-roommates whom I assume are pursuing medical school and do not pursue DO over MD.

As a question to you though if you don't mind: Since you were accepted to both DO and MD, which one are you choosing to attend in the end and why?
 
Last edited:

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Because of this sentence, your opinion on osteopathic physicians/medicine means absolutely nothing. Yes, I'm a pre med. But I have expereince working with DOs and MDs. I volunteered in a private practice with two orthopedic surgeons, one MD and one DO. They were equally as busy, the both saw patients, both did surgery. I spent time with both while they saw patients and not once did anyone ever bring up DO or MD. This is just one example. Everytime I interact with an MD i bring up the DO topic, mainy b/c of the crap you read on here and I have found that NO ONE CARES. tHE I've done my best to sift through the BS and find out information on my own. This is more than you can say.
hmm thats so weird...because i also shadowed an orthopedic surgeon who was a DO...

funny thing was that most of his patients in his practice did not care whatsoever that he was a DO. They did care however that he was a great surgeon.

i also shadowed a CT surgeon who was an MD. I asked both about how DO's are thought of in the medical community. As it turns out, the chief of surgery in the hospital was a DO. Considering that some DO's also take the USMLE and place into Allo residencies, how can any MD say they are smarter/more capable than a DO who scored just as well as they did and placed into the same residency programs as they have? I mean the acceptance stats for DO schools are less than MD, but its not like they're letting in complete idiots.

With this in mind, it is true that some regions of the US are more DO friendly, so this must be considered when applying. For me, I am from NJ, and would most likely be practicing in the NY/NJ area. If you are from a not-so friendly DO state, then I can see why you would be more hesistant to apply DO. So personally, I would be more than happy to attend a DO school over not attending medical school at all.
 

copingmethods

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 10, 2006
807
0
Status
Medical Student
Because of this sentence, your opinion on osteopathic physicians/medicine means absolutely nothing.
The point of my post wasn't to give MY opinion, I explicitly said that MY opinion was they're equal. The point of my post was to state what my mom's experience has been with her colleagues, as a practicing physician, not a premed.

I've done my best to sift through the BS and find out information on my own. This is more than you can say.
I'm trying to be civil, I'd appreciate the same. I'm not trying to insult anyone's training, and again, I explicitly said that MY opinion is that they're equal. And I happen to trust that if my mom says that she's seen this from other physicians, it's not BS.
 
About the Ads

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
OMM, COMLEX, and Residencies. <-- 'nuff said :p
So would you rather not get into an MD school, wait a whole year, reapply, and hope to get in the following year as opposed to just going to a DO school (assuming you are competitive enough)?

Keep in mind that many students in DO schools also take the USMLE and place into allo residencies.
 

Decicco

10+ Year Member
Jun 4, 2007
1,358
122
MN
Status
Resident [Any Field]
So would you rather not get into an MD school, wait a whole year, reapply, and hope to get in the following year as opposed to just going to a DO school (assuming you are competitive enough)?
I was facing the prospect of a DO school when I got a 26 MCAT. I waited a year, retook the MCAT and never looked back. If you want an MD and have marginal numbers, than I can offer nothing but encouragement that you can bring these up if you put in the effort. You don't want to start down a path that you are uncomfortable with.
 

TeamZissou

jaferd
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2008
1,402
38
MI
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Dear god this is pretty sad how skewed some of this information can be on here. Ryserr thanks for clearing up some stuff.

First off the biggest difference between DO and MD is that the DO's get trained in OMM. This leads to some differences in their boards. The USMLE puts more attention on biochemistry than the COMLEX does. Other than that there is little difference. Many DO schools and MD schools share the same rotation sites so (Mayo Clinic, Cook County etc.) DO's have the same structure as the majority of MD schools; science courses for the first two years and clinical rotations for the second two. DO's have their own residencies that they apply to IN ADDITION to being able to do MD residencies. Most MD residencies in Neurosurgery, Plastics, Orthopaedics, ENT, and Dermatology are filled by MD's however occasionally some will go to DO's. Whether it's because DO's aren't as qualified as the MD's that apply to the program or they prefer to up their chances to match in the DO residencies (which takes place earlier than the MD match and if they match they are automatically withdrawn from the MD match) will be debated till the end of time so don't bother.

I agree people seem to be prejudice to what they don't understand. The bias against DO is incredible on SDN. You would never hear a physician single out one of their collegues simply because they are a DO. In the real world they care much more about the quality of your work than where you went to school. I work in an ER with plenty of physicians, some MD and some DO and I'll tell you right now as far as their ability to practice medicine there is no difference. They are doing the SAME job as the other. If you know any nurses ask them if they are familiar with DO's and if there is a difference in how they practice.

I too applied to MD and DO this time around and I got an acceptance early on from some DO's. This took a tremendous amount of pressure out of the whole process and if you don't mind the initials that follow your name when your a physician I'd recommend it to anyone.

Hope this clears up a few things.... :)

Good luck to everyone in the current or future cycles!:thumbup:
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
The point of my post wasn't to give MY opinion, I explicitly said that MY opinion was they're equal. The point of my post was to state what my mom's experience has been with her colleagues, as a practicing physician, not a premed.

I'm trying to be civil, I'd appreciate the same. I'm not trying to insult anyone's training, and again, I explicitly said that MY opinion is that they're equal. And I happen to trust that if my mom says that she's seen this from other physicians, it's not BS.
Okay. My apologies. I'm all for keeping it civil. But whether or not I am pre med is irrelevant. Ive been in a medical environment of one sort or another for years now and I always ask the same questions (and always get the same answers). An overwhelming majority do not care whatsoever. I'm sure your mother has come across peope that have that prejudice against DOs, but now a days that is not the norm. Maybe you can ask her how prevalent that opinion is? My guess would be that she says for the most part, people are indifferent.


As a question to you though if you don't mind: Since you were accepted to both DO and MD, which one are you choosing to attend in the end and why?
Taken from my mdapps:

I will choose a school based on the following factors, in no particular order.
1) location/weather
2) campus/student atmosphere
3) global health opportunities/rotations
5) curriculum
4) financial aid (UC schools are basically free for me)
5) interview day (overall impression, facilities, interview, interactions, etc.)
6) class size (dartmouth has the edge on this one)
7) interaction with other interviewees

If at the end of the day, the school that fits me best based on those critera is a DO school...then that is where I will go. If at the end of the day, the school that fits me best based on those criteria is an MD school...then that is where I will go. I WILL NOT go to an MD school just because it is an MD school, and I WILL NOT be dropping all DO acceptances just b/c I have an MD acceptance. If I do happen to go to an MD school, I know that people will immidiately say things like 'I told you if you got an MD acceptance you'd forget about DO.' and I'm telling everyone right now that that is not how it is at all. If I go MD it is because the school that I feel fits me best happens to be an MD, it has nothing to do with the degree, prestigue, residency, or whatever. Of course, people will ignore this and talk **** to me anyway, but whatever, there is really nothing i can do to stop that.


I'm almost positive that I will be attending UC Irvine next year, which is kind of ironic b/c it started off in the late 19th century as an osteopathic school!
 

Pedsbro

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 7, 2008
860
3
Midwest (But always a Cali kid at heart)
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Dear god this is pretty sad how skewed some of this information can be on here. Ryserr thanks for clearing up some stuff.

First off the biggest difference between DO and MD is that the DO's get trained in OMM. This leads to some differences in their boards. The USMLE puts more attention on biochemistry than the COMLEX does. Other than that there is little difference. Many DO schools and MD schools share the same rotation sites so (Mayo Clinic, Cook County etc.) DO's have the same structure as the majority of MD schools; science courses for the first two years and clinical rotations for the second two. DO's have their own residencies that they apply to IN ADDITION to being able to do MD residencies. Most MD residencies in Neurosurgery, Plastics, Orthopaedics, ENT, and Dermatology are filled by MD's however occasionally some will go to DO's. Whether it's because DO's aren't as qualified as the MD's that apply to the program or they prefer to up their chances to match in the DO residencies (which takes place earlier than the MD match and if they match they are automatically withdrawn from the MD match) will be debated till the end of time so don't bother.

I agree people seem to be prejudice to what they don't understand. The bias against DO is incredible on SDN. You would never hear a physician single out one of their collegues simply because they are a DO. In the real world they care much more about the quality of your work than where you went to school. I work in an ER with plenty of physicians, some MD and some DO and I'll tell you right now as far as their ability to practice medicine there is no difference. They are doing the SAME job as the other. If you know any nurses ask them if they are familiar with DO's and if there is a difference in how they practice.

I too applied to MD and DO this time around and I got an acceptance early on from some DO's. This took a tremendous amount of pressure out of the whole process and if you don't mind the initials that follow your name when your a physician I'd recommend it to anyone.

Hope this clears up a few things.... :)

Good luck to everyone in the current or future cycles!:thumbup:
A civil, thought-out, well spoken answer..:thumbup: But wait, this is SDN! Cast him out!
 

236116

Guest
10+ Year Member
Dec 8, 2008
1,327
3
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
You would never hear a physician single out one of their collegues simply because they are a DO. In the real world they care much more about the quality of your work than where you went to school.
Yes, yes you would.

And no, no they don't.

:D

oh and you were adopted. yay!
 

146233

Phthirius pubis
10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2007
6,531
2
Status
Medical Student
The population that I have encountered that cares this much about DO vs. MD is pre-meds. Hands-down. Are there PD's who look down on DO's? Probably. Are there sub-par DO's that barely squeaked by the whole way through school? I'd bet on it. Are there sub-par MD's who also just barely squeaked by? Absolutely.

The type of physician one elects to see is a personal choice. It may be well- or ill-informed, but it is a personal choice. The same can be said of the type of medical school one chooses to apply to/attend.

Sure, DO's study OMM. Some enjoy it/believe in its efficacy/use it in practice, others do not. Some areas of the country are rife with DO's, others (like Chicago) have radio commercials to try and explain what they are.

While the sheer numbers may make it appear so, I'd stop well short of saying that all DO schools are easier to get into than any MD school. Ease of admission is hardly the determining factor of who performs better on licensing exams or, more importantly, in clinical practice.

I encourage everyone to keep an open mind and not continue to perpetuate myths or half-truths (especially those who can't be bothered to do their own research and rely, therefore, on hearsay). For those who refuse or are unable to do so now, perhaps some day you will. That said, if you are certain you'd never want to be a DO, please don't apply. You'll only make yourself unhappy in the long run and you'll take a spot someone else would kill for.

Medical school admissions is competitive enough in and of itself without us cutting each other down at the knees. Do your research, be supportive, and make an informed decision. :)
 

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I was facing the prospect of a DO school when I got a 26 MCAT. I waited a year, retook the MCAT and never looked back. If you want an MD and have marginal numbers, than I can offer nothing but encouragement that you can bring these up if you put in the effort. You don't want to start down a path that you are uncomfortable with.
So a better question to ask you on an interview is "Why do you want to be a MD?" instead of "Why do you want to be a doctor?"

Silly me...i just wanted to be a doctor...even if i have to drag the lowly DO title behind my name :rolleyes:
 

copingmethods

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 10, 2006
807
0
Status
Medical Student
Okay. My apologies. I'm all for keeping it civil. But whether or not I am pre med is irrelevant. Ive been in a medical environment of one sort or another for years now, and the overwhelming majority do not care whatsoever. I'm sure your mother has come across peope that have that prejudice against DOs, but now a days that is not the norm. Maybe you can ask her how prevalent that opinion is? My guess would be that she says for the most part, people are indifferent.
No worries - and yes, you're correct, from her experience, it's certainly not widespread, and I'm sure as time goes on, that view will continue to shrink. It's probably just a matter of MDs having actually worked w/ a DO and realizing that they practice the same medicine.
 

TeamZissou

jaferd
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2008
1,402
38
MI
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Haha thanks Pedsbro, I appreciate the compliment.

Yes, yes you would.

And no, no they don't.

:D

oh and you were adopted. yay!
Your right, there will always be bigots in this world no matter now much people try to increase education.;)
 
About the Ads

236116

Guest
10+ Year Member
Dec 8, 2008
1,327
3
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Your right, there will always be bigots in this world no matter now much people try to increase education.;)
true.

although in the case i'm thinking of at the moment, it had everything to do with the guy being a jerk and less with his being a do. but anyway.
 

TeamZissou

jaferd
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2008
1,402
38
MI
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Haha what!? A physician who is a ego driven jerk! I've never heard of such a thing!:laugh: And it NEVER happens with ER docs... ;)
 

236116

Guest
10+ Year Member
Dec 8, 2008
1,327
3
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Haha what!? A physician who is a ego driven jerk! I've never heard of such a thing!:laugh: And it NEVER happens with ER docs... ;)
i know right?

:eek: total shocker.

even more mysterious, they were both in that lowest of key- low-key specialities... surgery!
 

Kaustikos

Archerize It
Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jan 18, 2008
12,251
4,201
Always Bespin
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I just want to become a doctor. I don't give a [email protected] if I'm an MD or a DO as long as I get to pick a residency I am happy with. In the end, I'll be doing hte exact same thing as an MD so who fk'n cares about the stigma. If you're worried about the stigma, I'd be worried about your original intentions for wanting to become a physician. When you're disimpacting someones bowel, are you really going to think "Man, I'm glad I went and become an allopathic physician!"?

Or when you're doing rounds at the clinic and just trying to get by the 40-60 hour work week, are you going to worry about "Oh, man, this entire process might have been worse for a DO!"?
I can understand the research, as I don't even think there are any remotely interesting PhD programs in DO schools I would want (Toxicology/Pharmacology are my interests) as most are tailored to primary care, so to speak, but if you're worried about a "stigma", man, you're just like those annoying teenagers who only wear abercrombie and fitch because god forbid if everyone else in the class found out you didn't, you would be so UNcool and never get the promqueen for a date :smuggrin:
 

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Okay. My apologies. I'm all for keeping it civil. But whether or not I am pre med is irrelevant. Ive been in a medical environment of one sort or another for years now and I always ask the same questions (and always get the same answers). An overwhelming majority do not care whatsoever. I'm sure your mother has come across peope that have that prejudice against DOs, but now a days that is not the norm. Maybe you can ask her how prevalent that opinion is? My guess would be that she says for the most part, people are indifferent.




Taken from my mdapps:

I will choose a school based on the following factors, in no particular order.
1) location/weather
2) campus/student atmosphere
3) global health opportunities/rotations
5) curriculum
4) financial aid (UC schools are basically free for me)
5) interview day (overall impression, facilities, interview, interactions, etc.)
6) class size (dartmouth has the edge on this one)
7) interaction with other interviewees

If at the end of the day, the school that fits me best based on those critera is a DO school...then that is where I will go. If at the end of the day, the school that fits me best based on those criteria is an MD school...then that is where I will go. I WILL NOT go to an MD school just because it is an MD school, and I WILL NOT be dropping all DO acceptances just b/c I have an MD acceptance. If I do happen to go to an MD school, I know that people will immidiately say things like 'I told you if you got an MD acceptance you'd forget about DO.' and I'm telling everyone right now that that is not how it is at all. If I go MD it is because the school that I feel fits me best happens to be an MD, it has nothing to do with the degree, prestigue, residency, or whatever. Of course, people will ignore this and talk **** to me anyway, but whatever, there is really nothing i can do to stop that.


I'm almost positive that I will be attending UC Irvine next year, which is kind of ironic b/c it started off in the late 19th century as an osteopathic school!

You're just like me ryserr. I interviewed at 1 DO (UMDNJ) school and 3 MD (U of Vermont, VCU, NJMS) schools, and I can say with all honesty that I rather attend the DO school (UMDNJ) instead of VCU. This goes from personal preferences. I just don't see myself being happy there, and if I get in (I was waitlisted), I probably would not go there considering I do not see myself being happy there for the next 4 years of my life. UMDNJ-SOM, on the other hand, absolutely surprised me. The student life, atmosphere, curriculum, facilities, and just about everything about the school impressed me. I was more than happy to spend 23,000 a year (RIDICULOUSLY EXPENSIVE according to some on SDN) to attend this school, whose average gpa of matriculants btw is 3.5 (complete idiots).

I just hope that more people would do their own research instead of relying on what others say. After shadowing 2 DO's and 1 MD, i was more than anxious to go out and apply to DO schools in addition to MD schools.
 

Kaustikos

Archerize It
Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jan 18, 2008
12,251
4,201
Always Bespin
Status
Resident [Any Field]
So a better question to ask you on an interview is "Why do you want to be a MD?" instead of "Why do you want to be a doctor?"

Silly me...i just wanted to be a doctor...even if i have to drag the lowly DO title behind my name :rolleyes:
Sadly, DO schools are becoming the annoyances in this case by asking why one chose to become an "osteopathic" physician. Get over yourselves, damn it. We're applying to MEDICAL SCHOOL, it's all the same in the end.
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
You're just like me ryserr. I interviewed at 1 DO (UMDNJ) school and 3 MD (U of Vermont, VCU, NJMS) schools, and I can say with all honesty that I rather attend the DO school (UMDNJ) instead of VCU. This goes from personal preferences. I just don't see myself being happy there, and if I get in (I was waitlisted), I probably would not go there considering I do not see myself being happy there for the next 4 years of my life. UMDNJ-SOM, on the other hand, absolutely surprised me. The student life, atmosphere, curriculum, facilities, and just about everything about the school impressed me. I was more than happy to spend 23,000 a year (RIDICULOUSLY EXPENSIVE according to some on SDN) to attend this school, whose average gpa of matriculants btw is 3.5 (complete idiots).

I just hope that more people would do their own research instead of relying on what others say. After shadowing 2 DO's and 1 MD, i was more than anxious to go out and apply to DO schools in addition to MD schools.
:thumbup: I'm glad you found a place that you are gonna be happy at!
 

cyclin M

megaman
10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2008
337
1
Bunker
Status
Pre-Medical
Taken from my mdapps:

I will choose a school based on the following factors, in no particular order.
1) location/weather
2) campus/student atmosphere
3) global health opportunities/rotations
5) curriculum
4) financial aid (UC schools are basically free for me)
5) interview day (overall impression, facilities, interview, interactions, etc.)
6) class size (dartmouth has the edge on this one)
7) interaction with other interviewees
yeah this is a good list. How well you "fit" a school, despite how much people talk about it, is undervalued even though it is super important. Congrats btw.:thumbup:
 

tdittyx2x3

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jun 30, 2008
346
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Are you saying you'd choose a DO over MD education?
Depends. Right now I'm accepted at PCOM and waitlisted at EVMS. I think even if I do come off that EVMS waitlist I'll probably choose PCOM for its location in a great medical city / proximity to family and friends. Although it's not important to me, you might even be able to argue that PCOM has a bigger (better?) reputation in the medical community than EVMS.

I'm perfectly content with going the osteopathic route. While it is clear that the standards for admission are a peg lower, it is also clear that both MD and DO graduates are on even keel with eachother by the time they enter residency. If this is true, than I don't think standards for admission is a great criteria for choosing a school.
 
About the Ads

Tired

Fading away
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 12, 2006
3,884
784
Believe it or not, I know people who tell me their parents or themselves wouldn't go to a DO. There are people out there like that albeit fewer and fewer and albeit dependent on where you are. But yes there are still people out there who are as such. I've seen this firsthand more outside of SDN then on SDN.

PS not saying they are inferior. Just that such people exist. My persian friend told me years ago that her parents said they would never go to a DO. So I've seen it in the past. My exroommate's attitudes about DOs are not all that better. A lot of ignorant people still out there.
I really think that the DO schools pass out pamphlets to potential students, presented in question/answer format, that reads, "What is the difference between an MD and a DO? DOs have to learn more. Does anyone have a prejudice against DOs? No, except for a single 76yo MD who currently practices General Surgery in rural Montana."

The funny thing is that you and I (ie - people who have actually spent some time around medicine beyond the application process) can sit here and honestly say, "Yes, there is DO prejudice in certain arenas, and yes, you will encounter some ignorant patients and physicians who will look down on you because of your degree until you prove them wrong."

But that doesn't stop pre-osteo undergrads from rogering up with the self-important "Let me tell you how it really is . . . "

<sigh>

Gotta love pre-allo.
 

236116

Guest
10+ Year Member
Dec 8, 2008
1,327
3
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
But that doesn't stop pre-osteo undergrads from rogering up with the self-important "Let me tell you how it really is . . . "

<sigh>

Gotta love pre-allo.
*pets*

it's okay, tired. we love you.
 
D

deleted74029

I wonder if more would consider the DO route if it was called MDO.:confused:
 

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I really think that the DO schools pass out pamphlets to potential students, presented in question/answer format, that reads, "What is the difference between an MD and a DO? DOs have to learn more. Does anyone have a prejudice against DOs? No, except for a single 76yo MD who currently practices General Surgery in rural Montana."

The funny thing is that you and I (ie - people who have actually spent some time around medicine beyond the application process) can sit here and honestly say, "Yes, there is DO prejudice in certain arenas, and yes, you will encounter some ignorant patients and physicians who will look down on you because of your degree until you prove them wrong."

But that doesn't stop pre-osteo undergrads from rogering up with the self-important "Let me tell you how it really is . . . "

<sigh>

Gotta love pre-allo.
There is prejudice against DO's, just as there probably is prejudice against Carib MDs and IMGs. However, you make it seem like it is rampant in hospitals, and for that I disagree. The amount of prejudice against DO's is not enough for me to not consider the profession. (double negative, sorry)

That's the only point I'm saying.
 

p30doc

Ever true and unwavering
10+ Year Member
Aug 22, 2007
2,373
58
Status
Attending Physician
I would never apply to DO because I heard you have to bite off the head of a live bat as part of the interview. Then there are the constant wedgies that you will receive from your far superior MD counterparts. I also heard that nurses will routinely spit in your face without any repercussion upon seeing the vial DO letters stitched onto your lab coat. Finally MD's are paid 3x as much as DO's by the insurance companies, because they know the average MCAT score is about 3 pts higher at MD programs. QED.
 
Last edited:

238483

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2008
3
0
Status
I would never apply to DO because I heard you have to bite the head of a live bat as part of the interview. Then there are the constant wedgies that you will receive from your far superior MD counterparts. I also heard that nurses will routinely spit in your face without any repercussion upon seeing the vial DO letters stitched onto your lab coat. Finally MD's are paid 3x as much as DO's by the insurance companies, because they know the average MCAT score is about 3 pts higher at MD programs. QED.
 
About the Ads

Nasem

10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2006
1,008
0
39
Lansing, MI
Status
Pre-Medical
And as for people who think that getting into a DO program is easy, I can assure you that it is not. And while there are some programs that are "easier" to get into than others, the 1st 2 years will surely weed out those people that simply barely got in.
I respect everything you said, but the bolded statment confused me a little, when I normally look at the number of students addmitted for a class and the number that actually graduated, its always very close (example, 230 got in, but only 215 eventually graduated and earned their medical degree)... 215/230 = 93% which is pretty darn good.... but your saying that the first 2 years weeds alot of folks out, it just doesn't seem like that everytime I look at school's stats (MD or DO), they always have high rates of students who graduate
 

EagerCraft

Slipping Surly Bonds
10+ Year Member
Aug 28, 2008
19
0
Sunlit Silence
Status
Please take this with a grain of salt because im no expert, but IMO people seem to lean toward MD mainly b/c it's what they know. People fear what they don't understand and many people don't take to time to research/understand DO as evidenced by some of the replies in this thread. Im still in the process of deciding which route I want to take, but I will say that DO will not be my 1st option unless my grades dictate it's my only option. I feel DO’s are just as qualified as MD’s after all training is rendered, it’s just a personal decision. My podiatrist in a DO ..
Really? That's amazing considering that only doctors of podiatric medicine (DPMs) can be licensed to be podiatrists....

There is so much misinformation floating around here due to applicants' reliance on second hand information. If your (i.e. collective, rhetorical "you") only exposure to medicine is shadowing, do yourself a favor and get a real job for at least a year working in a doctor's office or a hospital. You'll see that relationship building is a lot more important than the letters behind your name, and that the major players in healthcare often have the credentials H.M.O.
 

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I respect everything you said, but the bolded statment confused me a little, when I normally look at the number of students addmitted for a class and the number that actually graduated, its always very close (example, 230 got in, but only 215 eventually graduated and earned their medical degree)... 215/230 = 93% which is pretty darn good.... but your saying that the first 2 years weeds alot of folks out, it just doesn't seem like that everytime I look at school's stats (MD or DO), they always have high rates of students who graduate
The DO schools I applied to had very high rates of graduation, and are the more reputable ones. Maybe he was talking about the less reputable ones????
 

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Really? That's amazing considering that only doctors of podiatric medicine (DPMs) can be licensed to be podiatrists....

There is so much misinformation floating around here due to applicants' reliance on second hand information. If your (i.e. collective, rhetorical "you") only exposure to medicine is shadowing, do yourself a favor and get a real job for at least a year working in a doctor's office or a hospital. You'll see that relationship building is a lot more important than the letters behind your name, and that the major players in healthcare often have the credentials H.M.O.
I caught that before, but just decided to ignore it due to its sheer ridiculousness.
 

Bacchus

Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2007
21,459
2,709
Status
Attending Physician
I have this information from a friend of mine who applied DO this cycle, as well as from my adviser. Also, the fee after getting accepted is not refundable, while MD fees are.



From what I have heard, you can not hold multiple acceptances at DO schools. Again, this comes from people I know applying to DO school who were forced to choose between two schools that they got accepted to. According to them, you have a 2 week grace period to decide between your acceptances.
I held 3 acceptances for over 3+ weeks. Your advisor and friend need to be educated or simmer down.
 

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
30
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
I respect everything you said, but the bolded statment confused me a little, when I normally look at the number of students addmitted for a class and the number that actually graduated, its always very close (example, 230 got in, but only 215 eventually graduated and earned their medical degree)... 215/230 = 93% which is pretty darn good.... but your saying that the first 2 years weeds alot of folks out, it just doesn't seem like that everytime I look at school's stats (MD or DO), they always have high rates of students who graduate
The DO schools I applied to had very high rates of graduation, and are the more reputable ones. Maybe he was talking about the less reputable ones????
I think he was simply just making the point that if you dont deserve to be there, the difficulty of the first two years (at any school) will weed you out. He wasnt saying that it happens all the time. MD and DO schools both do a great job of accepting people that are qualified and that deserve to be there. Its in their best interest.
 

Bacchus

Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2007
21,459
2,709
Status
Attending Physician
Sadly, DO schools are becoming the annoyances in this case by asking why one chose to become an "osteopathic" physician. Get over yourselves, damn it. We're applying to MEDICAL SCHOOL, it's all the same in the end.
I applied because of OMM first and foremost. My stats also made sense for me to apply. That said, I want to be a doctor of osteopathic medicine.
 

JStephens

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 21, 2008
81
1
South East
Status
Pre-Medical
Really? That's amazing considering that only doctors of podiatric medicine (DPMs) can be licensed to be podiatrists....

There is so much misinformation floating around here due to applicants' reliance on second hand information. If your (i.e. collective, rhetorical "you") only exposure to medicine is shadowing, do yourself a favor and get a real job for at least a year working in a doctor's office or a hospital. You'll see that relationship building is a lot more important than the letters behind your name, and that the major players in healthcare often have the credentials H.M.O.
You're right. Im looking at my RX and it says DPM, but I do remember seeing an Osteopathic diploma in his office. Are there any DO/DPM programs or something? I go back after the new year so Im sure i can clarify it.
 
Last edited:

Bacchus

Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2007
21,459
2,709
Status
Attending Physician
You're right. Im looking at my RX and it says DMP, but I do remember seeing an Osteopathic diploma in his office. Are there any DO/DPM programs or something? I go back after the new year so Im sure i can clarify it.
Podiatric medicine is a whole different arena. Your podiatrist would be an idiot if he got two separate medical degrees. If he wants to throw money around, he can aim for my coffers.
 

JStephens

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 21, 2008
81
1
South East
Status
Pre-Medical
I caught that before, but just decided to ignore it due to its sheer ridiculousness.
In the future, if I say something that is misguided or wrong, feel free to correct me no matter how misinformed my post may be. Im not fragile and id much rather have someone correct me so at least I can't correct my errors. I know very little, which is part of the reason I am here, so if there is a blatant opportunity to "school me", please take part. :thumbup:
 

Bacchus

Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2007
21,459
2,709
Status
Attending Physician
I won't deny there is ignorance against DOs. MD is thrown around like a frisbee on the 4th of July. However, the profession has been around for over a hundred years lending itself to legitimacy. I have had to explain to a lot of people what DO is. Plain and simple, more often than not, they were intrigued about the manipulation aspect. No one said, "eew you're going to be a DO." They hear the words "I'm going to be a doctor" and go "Wow!" All of my DO educated friends and acquaintances are super impressed that I got into one of the best DO schools in the country. Even those not as thoroughly educated tell me, "Wow, you're going to be a doctor, not many people can say that."
 

JaggerPlate

10+ Year Member
May 28, 2007
8,458
37
Status
Medical Student
I will give $20 to the first mod who closes this useless thread. There is more misinformation, pathetic 'internet nuts' on an 18 year old ego, and sad rantings of disgruntled 'residents' than I've seen on SDN in a long time. It sickens me that I even want any of this in life. Thanks to those who are being civil and to those trying to clear stuff up, but this thread is just sad and will only get worse. I don't even think the OP has made a single comment since the thread started.
 

NontradICUdoc

Why so Serious?????
Gold Donor
15+ Year Member
Oct 16, 2003
2,454
300
46
Philadelphia Area
Status
Attending Physician
I think he was simply just making the point that if you dont deserve to be there, the difficulty of the first two years (at any school) will weed you out. He wasnt saying that it happens all the time. MD and DO schools both do a great job of accepting people that are qualified and that deserve to be there. Its in their best interest.
this is exactly what I mean. The failure rate/drop out rate for any medical school is very low considering the amount of work, time, and money you put into it. However, there are those people that were either pushed into the profession, THOUGHT that they wanted to come into the profession, or were just not thoroughly prepared because they just did not put in the right effort.

You hear a lot about people saying that they are just not good at taking tests, well this may be why the failed out. It may also be that the person just cannot handle the immense amount of work needed (for instance, I had 9 finals in 7 days before break). Just the preparation for these exams is daunting.

Remember, people who are in medical school are supposed to be at the top of the bell curve. Sometimes, this is just not good enough.
 

hopefuldoc87

Killer tofu
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2007
568
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
In the future, if I say something that is misguided or wrong, feel free to correct me no matter how misinformed my post may be. Im not fragile and id much rather have someone correct me so at least I can't correct my errors. I know very little, which is part of the reason I am here, so if there is a blatant opportunity to "school me", please take part. :thumbup:
Sorry for sounding cruel, and will do in the future.

However, you must admit, if you saw someone say the words "The chiropractor I went to is a MD", wouldn't you find that amusing?
 

JaggerPlate

10+ Year Member
May 28, 2007
8,458
37
Status
Medical Student
Sorry for sounding cruel, and will do in the future.

However, you must admit, if you saw someone say the words "The chiropractor I went to is a MD", wouldn't you find that amusing?
Nope. The general public has such little knowledge about health care in general that nothing would shock me.
 

NontradICUdoc

Why so Serious?????
Gold Donor
15+ Year Member
Oct 16, 2003
2,454
300
46
Philadelphia Area
Status
Attending Physician
Sadly, DO schools are becoming the annoyances in this case by asking why one chose to become an "osteopathic" physician. Get over yourselves, damn it. We're applying to MEDICAL SCHOOL, it's all the same in the end.
The purpose of this question is to ensure, or at least do their best to ensure, that the school is just not being used as a stepping stone and that the applicant will finish the curriculum.

In the past, many students who did not get into an MD school would apply and get accepted to a DO school only to reapply to an MD school the following year after successfully completing 1 year at a DO school. This would boost their application and would then transfer out to an MD school. As a result, an applicant who would have been given that spot and would have completed their training was denied.
 

JStephens

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 21, 2008
81
1
South East
Status
Pre-Medical
Sorry for sounding cruel, and will do in the future.

However, you must admit, if you saw someone say the words "The chiropractor I went to is a MD", wouldn't you find that amusing?
Id laugh my ass off. :D I didn't take your comment as cruel. I don't take things on the internet personal. :zip:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
About the Ads