Jul 17, 2009
19
0
0
Status
Pharmacy Student
I'm just wondering what some of are going into podiatry for and how you became interested in it? I was originally pushed towards pharmacy by family and because everyone was talking about what a "hot" career it was a few years ago and even now. After working in a pharmacy for 3 years as a CPhT, I realized that I simply could not deal with the monotonous and stressful lifestyle that a retail pharmacist leads. I'm not very interested anymore in other aspects of the career either (hospital, nuclear, etc.)

That being said I am trying to find a career in medicine that I will truly enjoy and I think podiatry may be the ticket. I've had problems with my feet since I was very young and now have flat feet. Unfortunately, my pediatric doctors never listened to my complaints of leg pain when I was younger and said I would grow out of it, instead of correcting it or referring me to a pod. until it was too late. It has limited my activities, I'm only 22 and standing at work and playing sports without the correct shoes/orthotics can become very painful. I have developed tears in my ligaments from strenuous activities as well. A lot of this is besides the point but I feel that I would be very motivated to solve problems and help others with conditions like mine, having experienced the pain associated with foot problems. I'm just wondering what got you guys into it to get some idea if this is a good area for me to pursue?

Also, regarding admissions how competitive is pod. school? I'm relatively intelligent and was probably what most would consider "lazy" during school. I worked hard but definitely procrastinated a lot during undergrad and I'm graduating this year with a 3.4GPA overall and in biology. I have not taken my MCAT's yet, but otherwise would just like a general idea on admissions.
 

DrMushroomFoot

7+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2009
120
16
151
Status
I'm just wondering what some of are going into podiatry for and how you became interested in it? I was originally pushed towards pharmacy by family and because everyone was talking about what a "hot" career it was a few years ago and even now. After working in a pharmacy for 3 years as a CPhT, I realized that I simply could not deal with the monotonous and stressful lifestyle that a retail pharmacist leads. I'm not very interested anymore in other aspects of the career either (hospital, nuclear, etc.)

That being said I am trying to find a career in medicine that I will truly enjoy and I think podiatry may be the ticket. I've had problems with my feet since I was very young and now have flat feet. Unfortunately, my pediatric doctors never listened to my complaints of leg pain when I was younger and said I would grow out of it, instead of correcting it or referring me to a pod. until it was too late. It has limited my activities, I'm only 22 and standing at work and playing sports without the correct shoes/orthotics can become very painful. I have developed tears in my ligaments from strenuous activities as well. A lot of this is besides the point but I feel that I would be very motivated to solve problems and help others with conditions like mine, having experienced the pain associated with foot problems. I'm just wondering what got you guys into it to get some idea if this is a good area for me to pursue?

Also, regarding admissions how competitive is pod. school? I'm relatively intelligent and was probably what most would consider "lazy" during school. I worked hard but definitely procrastinated a lot during undergrad and I'm graduating this year with a 3.4GPA overall and in biology. I have not taken my MCAT's yet, but otherwise would just like a general idea on admissions.
STOP being lazy and perform a search! all your answers are easy to find with a little bit of reading :thumbup:
 

g squared 23

made it out alive
7+ Year Member
Mar 1, 2010
270
71
171
The woods
Status
Podiatrist
I'm just wondering what some of are going into podiatry for and how you became interested in it? I was originally pushed towards pharmacy by family and because everyone was talking about what a "hot" career it was a few years ago and even now. After working in a pharmacy for 3 years as a CPhT, I realized that I simply could not deal with the monotonous and stressful lifestyle that a retail pharmacist leads. I'm not very interested anymore in other aspects of the career either (hospital, nuclear, etc.)

That being said I am trying to find a career in medicine that I will truly enjoy and I think podiatry may be the ticket. I've had problems with my feet since I was very young and now have flat feet. Unfortunately, my pediatric doctors never listened to my complaints of leg pain when I was younger and said I would grow out of it, instead of correcting it or referring me to a pod. until it was too late. It has limited my activities, I'm only 22 and standing at work and playing sports without the correct shoes/orthotics can become very painful. I have developed tears in my ligaments from strenuous activities as well. A lot of this is besides the point but I feel that I would be very motivated to solve problems and help others with conditions like mine, having experienced the pain associated with foot problems. I'm just wondering what got you guys into it to get some idea if this is a good area for me to pursue?

Also, regarding admissions how competitive is pod. school? I'm relatively intelligent and was probably what most would consider "lazy" during school. I worked hard but definitely procrastinated a lot during undergrad and I'm graduating this year with a 3.4GPA overall and in biology. I have not taken my MCAT's yet, but otherwise would just like a general idea on admissions.
Relative to med school, podiatry school is NOT very competitive at all. With your GPA and a middle of the road MCAT, you should be set if you come off as having a real motivated interest in the profession.

However, before you take the plunge, you really, really need to find a podiatrist in your area to shadow. I am not talking one half day of clinic or just watching a few "sexy" surgeries. Try to get the feel of what a real day/week/ month of being a podiatrist is all about. It's definitely not all glory, all the time like some of the surgical podiatrists and admissions people might make it seem. But it seems to me that overall most are at least satisfied or happy with their career choice (unless they have been lying to me).

I'll admit that in undergrad I was a bit lazy as well, and the end result while not bad by any standards, was less than my potential could have allowed. Just know for the future that that kind of work ethic won't fly in any postgraduate schooling, podiatry school included. I had to change my act when I got here, but I knew that coming in. School is TOUGH. It is not a dumbed down medical school like some people might believe. You're going to have to drastically change your study habits to succeed, and you can start by studying hard for the MCAT and hopefully that will give some insight as to whether or not you can hack it.

Positives of podiatry that were attractive to me were the potential hours allowing you to have a life outside of the office, decent income (or at least it was...), ability to work with your hands (yes, including surgery) and being an absolute expert in your field.

Negatives: often seen as a "2nd class doctor" including our continuing struggle for parity, income (21% Medicare cuts across the board for ALL doctors), routine foot care aspect can be seen just as "monotonous" as pharmacy (no offense to those who enjoy it and yes I realize it is an important part of what we do and no I did not say that I think it is boring or unimportant), often people don't even know what a podiatrist does or is or that they are competent foot and ankle surgeons.

GL, but don't make any rash decisions, especially with the current cuts. Take your time, do a LOT of research and do something that you'll enjoy.