Will graduate school classes bump my GPA up as reported by the AMCAS?

hannahfox

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As calculated by the AMCAS

My Science GPA = 3.357
My Overall GPA = 3.448

Over last 42 hours my GPA = 3.98 (only A- was in Public Speaking)

I am about to start a Biomedical Sciences PhD program. Will that affect my reported GPA (I know it is weighted different by individual schools) but on paper, will graduate school courses increase my oGPA and sGPA?
 

theWUbear

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No. This is common knowledge, but I'll throw in that I met with a Dean of Admissions at an MD school in the northeast last week and she pointed out that my SMP grades will average in with my undergrad science grades...if I become more realistic and do DO! total burn.

They will see a two by four chart that says "semester gpa" and "total gpa" for each semester (make that two charts - one for science gpa).

The graduate school grades will be on a separate line and will not affect the total gpa
 

hannahfox

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Wow that is disappointing. Looks like regardless of what MCAT score I get, I will hit a bunch of cutoffs if the AMCAS does not count graduate classes in my totalGPA.

Anybody else have an input?
 

armybound

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My GPAs were very similar to yours and I got a Master's. As was said, it won't factor into your undergrad GPA, but it may be something they look at separately. I had several interviews where they commented on my recent academic success and didn't bring up my undergrad GPA.
 

Latuza

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I asked the AMCAS over email what they'll do with my community college classes I took after my bachelor's degree. They said that those classes will be listed as my post-bac undergrad GPA and WILL be calculated into the cumulative undergrad GPA.

So I think, to ramp up your undergrad GPA, you just need to take classes NOT as part of a graduate degree program. Like summer or non-degree year classes at undergrad institution. I also think the non-degree post-bac program that med schools offer (different from SMP) will be calculated into your undergrad GPA. I'm not sure, double check with AMCAS.

But like what the previous poster said, if you get high GPA in grad school, that'll help to compensate for your undergrad GPA during admission evaluation. Since your undergrad GPA isn't impossibly low, you may come off doing well in admissions with a high grad school GPA.

Here's my official AMCAS response:
"Post bac work refers to any undergraduate course you have taken after receiving your initial bachelors degree. It does not refer to only coursework taken in a formal post bac program. Post bac coursework is included in the 'undergraduate total' GPA."
 

morning

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No. This is common knowledge, but I'll throw in that I met with a Dean of Admissions at an MD school in the northeast last week and she pointed out that my SMP grades will average in with my undergrad science grades...if I become more realistic and do DO! total burn.

They will see a two by four chart that says "semester gpa" and "total gpa" for each semester (make that two charts - one for science gpa).

The graduate school grades will be on a separate line and will not affect the total gpa
Destroying an SMP will look very good to MD schools regardless of your undergrad GPA. I mean, it's never good to have a low undergrad GPA, but having really excelled at an SMP is much better than excelling at a traditional master's degree.
 

Latuza

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Destroying an SMP will look very good to MD schools regardless of your undergrad GPA. I mean, it's never good to have a low undergrad GPA, but having really excelled at an SMP is much better than excelling at a traditional master's degree.
Yes, good point. But then in SMP program you're taking classes with the real med students and have to compete with them for class rank/grades. It's a gamble in my opinion. But if you do well it's a huge plus.