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Dec 9, 2018
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I know this post is long, feel free to skip until the end - any insight is appreciated

Intro:

The first two years of college have been pretty hard for me. I decided prior to this (third) semester that I wanted to go to medical school, ideally an MD program. I knew I would have to get my GPA up, starting this semester.
Life intervened, and I'm even more ****ed than I was before.

Some context:
In high school I was the typical underachiever, ~3.5 GPA; 35 ACT; 2300 SAT.
Did well enough but was too distracted by issues with home life to care about learning.

The issue(s):
First semester I was on a D1 athletic team - thought I would go into Biomedical Engineering but spent too much time traveling, practicing and sleeping to do well enough to get into the program.
Grades included a C in Gen Chem 1 and a BC in Linear Algebra & Differential Equations.

2.79 overall / 2.21 science

Second semester I did pretty well, comparatively speaking. My GPA improved somewhat since I quit my sport and spent more time in the library.
Decided I hated my Gen Chem sequence after getting a C in it 1st semester (didn't do any graded homework) and that the best way to show I didn't like it was to again do poorly in it. C in Gen Chem and AB in Statics.

2.98 overall / 2.40 science


This semester could best be described as a nightmare of extenuating circumstances - having to make the 5 hour trip home several weekends due to health issues in the family, getting worn very thin. I should have withdrawn but there was no way I could with the financial situation I am in. Following the outcomes I experienced this semester, I've decided to dissociate myself from my family, at least temporarily, though it may in fact be too late.
This semester I earned D's in a Thermo course and Organic 1, though I may have actually earned an F in Orgo. I earned a C in Microbio, earning an AB based on my exam grades but forgetting to do most of the online quizzes assigned.

Best case scenario: 2.63 overall / 2.14 science
Worst case scenario: 2.55 overall / 2.0 science


I didn't become suddenly brain damaged upon high school graduation, though my stats would appear to represent that.

The question:
How bad am I looking?
As of right now I'm assuming that with a 4.0 15 credit/semester load + summers it would take a couple years of post-bacc, especially to recover my science GPA.
More information can be provided if needed, but any input regarding whether this career path is even a viable option for me anymore would be helpful.
 
Last edited:
Dec 9, 2018
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0
Started looking into retroactive withdrawal for my university to try and wipe this last semester away, literally just redo it all throughout the next few semester - taking an extra semester to graduate would be preferable to having this one on my record.

Beyond that I don't think there are any options to make anything go away.
 

Goro

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I know this post is long, feel free to skip until the end - any insight is appreciated

Intro:

The first two years of college have been pretty hard for me. I decided prior to this (third) semester that I wanted to go to medical school, ideally an MD program. I knew I would have to get my GPA up, starting this semester.
Life intervened, and I'm even more ****ed than I was before.

Some context:
In high school I was the typical underachiever, ~3.5 GPA; 35 ACT; 2300 SAT.
Did well enough but was too distracted by issues with home life to care about learning.

The issue(s):
First semester I was on a D1 athletic team - thought I would go into Biomedical Engineering but spent too much time traveling, practicing and sleeping to do well enough to get into the program.
Grades included a C in Gen Chem 1 and a BC in Linear Algebra & Differential Equations.

2.79 overall / 2.21 science

Second semester I did pretty well, comparatively speaking. My GPA improved somewhat since I quit my sport and spent more time in the library.
Decided I hated my Gen Chem sequence after getting a C in it 1st semester (didn't do any graded homework) and that the best way to show I didn't like it was to again do poorly in it. C in Gen Chem and AB in Statics.

2.98 overall / 2.40 science


This semester could best be described as a nightmare of extenuating circumstances - having to make the 5 hour trip home several weekends due to health issues in the family, getting worn very thin. I should have withdrawn but there was no way I could with the financial situation I am in. Following the outcomes I experienced this semester, I've decided to dissociate myself from my family, at least temporarily, though it may in fact be too late.
This semester I earned D's in a Thermo course and Organic 1, though I may have actually earned an F in Orgo. I earned a C in Microbio, earning an AB based on my exam grades but forgetting to do most of the online quizzes assigned.

Best case scenario: 2.63 overall / 2.14 science
Worst case scenario: 2.55 overall / 2.0 science


I didn't become suddenly brain damaged upon high school graduation, though my stats would appear to represent that.

The question:
How bad am I looking?
As of right now I'm assuming that with a 4.0 15 credit/semester load + summers it would take a couple years of post-bacc, especially to recover my science GPA.
More information can be provided if needed, but any input regarding whether this career path is even a viable option for me anymore would be helpful.
Chances right now are lethal.

But you're also engaging in too much magic thinking, because it wasn't your brain power that's an issue, it was your choice making.

So,, you need to prioritize, stop trying to bulldoze your way through when you're doing poorly in Life, learn time and coping skills.

And yes, if need be, you withdraw and go get a job. Work for a few years and save up some mony.Do not engage in the sunk cost fallacy.

Read this:
 
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OneTwoThreeFour

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I know this post is long, feel free to skip until the end - any insight is appreciated

Intro:

The first two years of college have been pretty hard for me. I decided prior to this (third) semester that I wanted to go to medical school, ideally an MD program. I knew I would have to get my GPA up, starting this semester.
Life intervened, and I'm even more ****ed than I was before.

Some context:
In high school I was the typical underachiever, ~3.5 GPA; 35 ACT; 2300 SAT.
Did well enough but was too distracted by issues with home life to care about learning.

The issue(s):
First semester I was on a D1 athletic team - thought I would go into Biomedical Engineering but spent too much time traveling, practicing and sleeping to do well enough to get into the program.
Grades included a C in Gen Chem 1 and a BC in Linear Algebra & Differential Equations.

2.79 overall / 2.21 science

Second semester I did pretty well, comparatively speaking. My GPA improved somewhat since I quit my sport and spent more time in the library.
Decided I hated my Gen Chem sequence after getting a C in it 1st semester (didn't do any graded homework) and that the best way to show I didn't like it was to again do poorly in it. C in Gen Chem and AB in Statics.

2.98 overall / 2.40 science


This semester could best be described as a nightmare of extenuating circumstances - having to make the 5 hour trip home several weekends due to health issues in the family, getting worn very thin. I should have withdrawn but there was no way I could with the financial situation I am in. Following the outcomes I experienced this semester, I've decided to dissociate myself from my family, at least temporarily, though it may in fact be too late.
This semester I earned D's in a Thermo course and Organic 1, though I may have actually earned an F in Orgo. I earned a C in Microbio, earning an AB based on my exam grades but forgetting to do most of the online quizzes assigned.

Best case scenario: 2.63 overall / 2.14 science
Worst case scenario: 2.55 overall / 2.0 science


I didn't become suddenly brain damaged upon high school graduation, though my stats would appear to represent that.

The question:
How bad am I looking?
As of right now I'm assuming that with a 4.0 15 credit/semester load + summers it would take a couple years of post-bacc, especially to recover my science GPA.
More information can be provided if needed, but any input regarding whether this career path is even a viable option for me anymore would be helpful.
You are three semesters into school. There's plenty of time to do better than you have done and one day make it into medical school. But start with one semester with a 4.0 before you plan out multiple years and a post-bacc. You have to show-to yourself more than to schools-that you aren't a "typical underachiever."
 
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MDProspect

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100% agree with Goro. My recommendation is to retake the courses that have C's or below. Depends on how much you improve your GPA before you apply, you might need to do an SMP program instead of a postbacc. Get a high MCAT score. It is easier to overlook a poor GPA than a bad MCAT score. Before doing any of this, reevaluate your situation. Make sure you can handle the workload otherwise medical school is not the right choice.
 

candbgirl

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What exactly makes you think you are going to get a 4.0 for the next several semesters? Maybe you need to take a LOA and get yourself together. Get a job, do some shadowing, do some clinical work and nonclinical volunteering. See if you really want to go forward with the premed path. It is going to be really, really hard to recover your GPA. In fact it might be impossible to reach whatever the autoscreen GPA will be when you apply( assume a 3.2?). But you need to get yourself well and thinking straight before you make any decisions. Read @Goro’s guide and see what you need to do. Good luck.
 
Dec 9, 2018
5
0
What exactly makes you think you are going to get a 4.0 for the next several semesters? Maybe you need to take a LOA and get yourself together. Get a job, do some shadowing, do some clinical work and nonclinical volunteering. See if you really want to go forward with the premed path. It is going to be really, really hard to recover your GPA. In fact it might be impossible to reach whatever the autoscreen GPA will be when you apply( assume a 3.2?). But you need to get yourself well and thinking straight before you make any decisions. Read @Goro’s guide and see what you need to do. Good luck.
That's a very good question, so far I've decided to dissociate myself from my family at least for the time being; that's going to be significant in terms of me having the time to address what I need to within my own situation.

I'm also considering getting back on my ADHD medication, for a while I was prescribed concerta but stopped taking it sophomore year high school due to side effects


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I echo the thoughts of the other adults who have posted. Withdraw for this semester if possible, even if it is considered "medical" leave. You are very young to have had to deal with all of the family stuff. Get a job, get some evaluation (and treatment if indicated) for any possible mental health or ADHD issues and continue to explore your interest in the medical profession by shadowing and community service. You may find that you want to help others by being a teacher or social worker or chaplain, or that you want to have a different role in med field. You are obviously very bright and have a lot to offer - but like the people on the plane, you can not help others until you are in a better position yourself.

Many colleges, even some elite ones with great financial aid budgets, have special programs for "older" undergrads - if you ultimately decide to attend a different school after a few years (Brown and Smith come to mind). One advantage to waiting is that you would be considered independent in terms of your FAFSA in the year you are turning 24. So even if it takes that long to get back, you will have options. The goal in life is to be happy and a contributing member to community and there are many non-traditional ways to get there. But trust me, there is NO rush.
 
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Dec 9, 2018
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One other part of the consideration is if I were to do well on the mcat, and go to work for a year or two, then apply. My major is agricultural engineering with a specialty in biological systems, so lab work is a possibility.

How much could this potentially offset the lower GPA I'll likely still have compared to other applicants?


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MDProspect

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One other part of the consideration is if I were to do well on the mcat, and go to work for a year or two, then apply. My major is agricultural engineering with a specialty in biological systems, so lab work is a possibility.

How much could this potentially offset the lower GPA I'll likely still have compared to other applicants?


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You will be competing with candidates who will also have work experience and research, and they will also have solid GPAs and MCAT scores. Work experience and research are application fluffs that are used to distinguish you from other candidates with a similar ranking. Neither will offset the low GPA and you need to have the numbers to show that you are capable of handling the material; no one will admit a candidate who has a potential risk of failing out of med school. Although the MCAT is not a significant predictor of how well you will perform in medical school, it is one of the best equalizers for screening applicants. With a high score, you will have fewer hurdles to get over. Additionally, thinking that your major will impress anyone is a premed fallacy. You can major in music and still get into med school.

Try your best to handle your family and health situations. Getting 4.0 semesters throughout the rest of your undergrad career will require substantial changes to your study habits. If you are not relying on agricultural engineering to be your backup plan, then consider switching majors. I'd also recommend not taking more than one science class simultaneously before you can handle the workload even if it takes you longer to graduate.

If your GPA is still poor by the last year, but better than what it is now, you may have to consider doing a science master's program (SMP) at a medical school that links their master's program to their incoming MD class. This option; however, is still a gamble, costly, and may completely eliminate your chances of becoming a doctor if you fail out.
 
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Goro

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One other part of the consideration is if I were to do well on the mcat, and go to work for a year or two, then apply. My major is agricultural engineering with a specialty in biological systems, so lab work is a possibility.

How much could this potentially offset the lower GPA I'll likely still have compared to other applicants?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
High MCATs do not salvage poor GPAs. They merely accentuate the disparity.

Why do you believe that you will do well on MCAT? I'm not a fan of magic thinking.

You have yet to show that you can handle med school.
 

DokterMom

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"I'm also considering getting back on my ADHD medication, for a while I was prescribed concerta but stopped taking it sophomore year high school due to side effects"


Dude! This could explain pretty much everything. Work with your physician to find a med that works for you. Consult your school's learning center to find ways to study more effectively. Cut out your family if they're toxic and give it one last effort. You're in a pretty deep hole, so odds are long. But if you've been dx'd ADHD and aren't medicating, then FGS fix that first!
 

holycrap

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Don’t listen to the naysayers, if this is really what you want in life it doesn’t matter how many years it’ll take. People have come back from worse situations, I believe in you.
 

holycrap

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Poor advice. I've seen way too many people with no realistic chance of acceptance refuse to consider anything but medicine. They're putting their entire life on hold for a dream that won't happen. It's much better to look at things objectively rather than through rose-coloured lenses
Nothing wrong with this, I respect people that never lose hope even if things don’t work out in the end. Trying to make your dreams come true isn’t putting your life on hold.
 

doc05

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GPA is unsalvageable. No evidence or reason why OP is even committed to a medical career. Not everyone can become a doctor, nor should everyone.

Take a LOA from school, and when you go back, study something that will make you employable. Your chances of getting into med school are nonexistent. Cut your losses and get on with your life.
 
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libertyyne

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MD is almost impossible unless you are secretly UIM or live in a state with low matriculation stats.

Two options.

First Option:
1. Postbac 2 years of 4.0
2.Kill mcat
3. Apply predominately to schools that give extra weight to last 60 credits

Even then odds are worse than a cointoss.

Second Option:
Go to connected Postbac or SMP with guaranteed interview or admission if you meet certain criteria. There are DO programs out there that you should be focusing on.

Third option go to become an NP.
 
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