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2016-2017 Psychiatry Interview Reviews

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Seroquel

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Right. And that's why I think splik was saying that a physically remote psych ED would be a red flag.

If that is the setup, I am happy to accept it might be one of two in the Midwest, but there definitely more than a handful in the country as a whole. I know you are not the origin of that little factoid, but one hears rather a lot of that sort of thing during interview season and so a bit of fact-checking is appropriate.

Yes, I imagine that would be red flag, good thing that isn't the case though ;)
Thanks to you and Splik for all the ardent fact-checking. It's a tad more difficult as a starry-eyed interviewee not to pick up on any potential issues with a program.
 
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Merovinge

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I think you'll find those more frequently, at least in larger cities. I know I trained in one in Ann Arbor, and I know of another busy one in Minneapolis. But I agree that the key distinction is whether it is actuallly run by a psychiatrist vs. a location for containment and consultation.

The one in Minneapolis is great too and Chicago will be getting its first in 2017. Good to know UMich is doing that, I sadly have not gotten to spend any time in Ann Arbor. They are not unicorns by any stretch but also relatively few trainees get an opportunity to work in one and I have heard almost universally good things about getting that exposure in training.
 

clausewitz2

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That is, not a wing of a regular ER or specific rooms set aside for psych patients. One that was built/designed/run explicitly with psychiatric patients in mind, staffed by triage/nursing/techs that are trained in & work with psychiatric patients. Where the psychiatrist is the attending in charge of the patients care and ED docs if needed are the consultants or brought on to co-manage.

Dunno if it counts as Midwest in your book but Louisville was set up this way.
 
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The one in Minneapolis is great too and Chicago will be getting its first in 2017. Good to know UMich is doing that, I sadly have not gotten to spend any time in Ann Arbor. They are not unicorns by any stretch but also relatively few trainees get an opportunity to work in one and I have heard almost universally good things about getting that exposure in training.
MGH has this, as well.
 

takeeacy

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Yale has a Psych ED (similar to a fairly well-known/real county psych ED I rotated at before) named the Crisis Intervention Unit
 

Amygdarya

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NYP-Cornell has a small but specifically arranged for acute psychiatric patients Psych ED (next door to the main ED within the hospital) staffed with psychiatry attendings and residents. They also have a few (5-6) beds for extended psych ED stays (I.e. someone who's not getting admitted right away but may need 72 hour observation).
Bellevue has a famous psych ED separate from the main ED and staffed by psychiatrists.
Just a couple of examples from NYC. It seems like psych EDs are not unheard of in some parts of the US.
 

DrStrange

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Thanks for all the reviews! Anyone here interviewed at RUMC in Staten Island? Would like to read a review about this program.
 

clozareal

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Mt. Sinai: Icahn - New York, NY

1. Ease of Communication: Initial invite through ERAS, and then confirmed with PDF attachments. It was difficult to try and open up the PDFs on my phone, so I ended up emailing the documents to myself for easier access/reference. Otherwise, the communication was prompt and I did not have any issues.

2. Accommodation & Food: No accommodation. Breakfast was muffins, OJ, coffee, yogurt parfaits, and fruit. Catered lunch, cookies, Lindt chocolate at PM presentation. Dinner at a resident's apartment which was very nice.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Introduction by the chief resident followed by an introduction... but not to the program per se, but rather to the APD and PD: we listened to a 30-minute, highly detailed autobiographical narrative from the APD, Dr. Simon, followed by a 30-minute autobiographical narrative of Dr. New, the PD. While it was fine to hear about their own "why psychiatry?" and "why medicine?" and learn about precisely which medical schools they were choosing between and such, I am unclear about what the purpose of this was, because the lack of program overview that is typically given in the morning intro sessions made it difficult to come up with questions for my interviewers about the program later on.

This morning introduction was followed by three interviews with two faculty members and the PD or APD with one break in between. No unusual questions. Two interviewers appeared to have gone over my application, while one hadn't and honestly didn't seem terribly interested, which made for an awkward interview. I was asked basic/general questions including why psychiatry, etc. The APD, a friendly, relatively young guy who has been trained analytically, rambled on quite a bit in various directions and seemed interested in talking about himself while gazing upwards at the ceiling. I think he meets with all of the applicants. We had a 30-minute break in between and some residents stopped by to chat briefly during this time.

After that we had lunch, and then a PM presentation about the program logistics and resident life which was more consistent with what I was expecting in the AM. This ended with a brief tour of the inpatient facilities and call room led by the chief resident.

4. Program Overview: Don't remember specific call schedule; apparently each class divides it up amongst themselves. Outpatient exposure begins in PGY-2 instead of 3. Full day (8-5) devoted to didactics. Residents had mixed reviews about the didactics. Residents said that ancillary staff were good. The program director and my interviewers emphasized that this was a place where "self-starters" and self-directed learners would thrive but people who preferred more structure might be better served looking elsewhere. There are many tracks (global mental health, teaching track, etc) that the program presents as "majors." I was unclear as to what the actual outcomes were of the residents who pursued each track.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: Seems like the department has worked hard to recruit new people from other institutions recently. These people seem to be very accomplished. The faculty also covers many different areas of psychiatry in their research. However, it was hard to get a sense of the cohesiveness of the department and it did not seem to be a terribly collaborative environment and rather it seemed like the faculty kinda just did their thing and did their best to pull in NIH funding (which was emphasized once or twice during the interview day). The residents were very accomplished and I bet it's a competitive residency to match into due to location. The residents said that the faculty were accessible but I didn't get any tangible examples of this.

6. Location & Lifestyle: Between Harlem and Upper East Side, off the 4, 5, 6 line and adjacent to Central Park and Museum Mile. Not a bad location in NYC overall. Some residents had children during residency and said they felt well-supported in this.

7. Salary & Benefits: Subsidized housing guaranteed. Didn't get to see housing, but heard it's decent. Two-person occupancy for 1-BR apartment. Salary starts at $61k. Moonlighting options are available starting in PGY-2 in both psychiatry and neurology.

8. Program Strengths: research opportunities (and PhD+research track and physician-scientist track available), laid-back/relaxed culture, residents able to land good fellowships in a variety of fields, decent facilities, friendly and highly qualified residents, did not appear overworked. Multiple training sites, especially with the recent acquisition of many NYC hospitals/clinics. Nice location in NYC with subsidized housing.

9. Potential Weaknesses: I got the impression that the residents were very accomplished and friendly but fragmented. My impression of the program is that its major draw is its location and the prestige of the overall hospital versus the actual strength of the department, which seems to have been undergoing many changes lately. The laid-back / relaxed culture could be seen as a negative- for example, the lack of formal mentoring which can work sometimes but also puts people at risk for spending four years feeling adrift.

APD seems like a nice guy but spent an awful lot of time talking about himself during the interview day; not sure what this translates to on a day-to-day basis. The APD and chief were also looking at their phones during the PM presentation, which seemed odd and somewhat rude to me. I also had some strange interactions that might be best summed up as the nice words about the program not entirely congruent with affect when the faculty and residents were telling me about what they liked so much about Sinai.

Overall, this is a solid academic program in a highly desirable location that has been undergoing a number of changes both in faculty and in mission recently. I am mixed about the vibe.
 

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Mount Sinai: Beth Israel - New York, NY

1. Ease of Communication: I think this was mentioned in the interview thread, but I responded to my interview invitation (via email) within a few minutes and it took about a week to get my interview confirmed. I also didn't get an invitation to the happy hour until literally 1-2 days before and assumed there wasn't one, so I wasn't able to plan ahead/attend. The program coordinator is a very nice person and greeted us all by name when we got there.

2. Accommodation & Food: No accommodation. Breakfast was orange juice, coffee, pastries, parfaits. Lunch was sandwiches. There were some cookies and coffee at the wrap-up session.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): Powerpoint presentation given by the PD followed by a tour led by two residents. Three 30-minute interviews, two with faculty, one with a resident. I think some applicants are interviewed by PGY-1s/2s, which provided limited insight into the program, especially because the tour was already led by PGY1/2s. I heard that the chief residents also did interviews, but I did not interact with (or even meet) them, which was kind of a negative because I was interested in getting a sense of what the leadership was like. Two of my interviews were very complimentary and standard why-psych, what-was-a-challenge-you-faced, etc. It did seem like one of my interviewers had read parts of my application, while the other two hadn't. I did have one very intimidating interview where I was basically pimped at some point but I don't think it was in a malignant way.
After that we had a lunch which was well-attended by the residents, although a few seemed to not interact much with the interviewees and it felt like they were there for the free food. Overall the lunch was helpful to get a better sense of the program, and most residents seemed happy and enthusiastic about the program. The day ended early at 2 PM with a wrap-up.

4. Program Overview: Pretty standard... don't remember the exact details, but medicine for 4 months (or blocks?) and then ED + CPEP. Call on medicine: q4d until 8-9 pm weekday, weekend/holiday 7a-8p twice a month, no overnight call. ... basically by PGY-4, there is no call.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: The PD seemed nice, chill. Wasn't exactly clear on how involved he was with the residents, but at least he seemed to know of their general ambitions. The research program director is accurately described as "intense." Residents said they felt thrown in the deep end during their first few weeks of intern year and that there wasn't much of an orientation. They said that their faculty members were responsive and easy to reach out to, though I didn't get many concrete examples of this. Residents came from all over with a NY bias, some were international medical graduates. One resident seemed quite tired, others seemed nice, normal. Ultimately it seems like they either stay on or go to other NYC institutions (Einstein, Columbia, NYU) for fellowship.

6. Location & Lifestyle: Near Gramercy Park, which is a very nice and lively part of Manhattan. Some residents seem to have been able to have kids.

7. Salary & Benefits: Residents are unionized and say that they have good benefits because of this. Of note, the subsidized housing was recently removed as a benefit and the residents were moved to live on the upper west side (which is a 40-45 minute commute now). Kind of a bummer. Residents get reimbursed for psychotherapy and I heard that many take advantage of this to go once to twice a week during residency.

8. Program Strengths: AMAZING location, extremely diverse patient population, cool research chair who seems to be involved in didactics. Balanced psychopharm and psychotherapy training. Psychotherapy for residents is encouraged.

9. Potential Weaknesses: In general it seems like a somewhat disorganized program due to the merger between Sinai. The faculty seemed like they still had many plans on shaping the overall mission of the program, and I wasn't clear on how this might affect resident training / their own sense of what their objectives were. It has more of a community feel which could be a strength or a weakness depending on your goals although the residents did emphasize that they were able to collaborate with Mount Sinai Icahn if you wanted to do research. The facilities aren't the nicest; the building itself is somewhat labyrinthine and dimly lit. There is supposed to be a new building devoted to psychiatry ($85 million budget), but we didn't get a specific timeline as to when this would actually happen, so I am guessing that it wouldn't affect/benefit the incoming class. Also, no subsidized housing nearby as per above.
 

clozareal

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University of Kansas (KUMC) – Kansas City, KS

1. Ease of Communication:
Communication was through ERAS messages, no programs used for scheduling. Responses can be delayed by a day or so for those who are anxious. No real issues encountered.

2. Accommodation & Food:
Hotel discount was provided. For the pre-interview dinner, do not order the chicken unless you want a whole chicken to eat for a week. Light breakfast provided on interview day. No interview day lunch. We didn’t get to meet many residents. Those that we met were self-described happy. Residents didn’t seem to have as much of a get-together culture. They even appeared a bit formal towards one another.

3 major themes seem to be:
1. Confidence in training – residents feel ready for the working world. Described training as comfortable amounts of “hand-holding”
2. Great flexibility and accommodation for individual needs (special curricula or family life).
3. Light call schedule

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
It was a short day that ended before lunch. 8 applicants split into 2 groups of 4. One group started with 30 minute interviews with the faculty while the other half. The other group went on a tour and then we switched. No objective signs, but the program director came across as especially intelligent, even in medicine. Some of the interviews were awkward. It may be a personal issue, especially considering it was my first interview. One interviewer was dismissive from the start. Another had multiple “What is your spirit animal?” type of questions. After the interviews, there was a form to fill out with more “Spirit animal” questions.

4. Program Overview:
- The program serves both Kansas and Missouri. Social work is different depending on the patient’s residence.
- PRITE 50th percentile is required for moonlighting in the third year or beyond
- Available fellowships: addiction and Child
- Inpatient psych patient load is 12 between 2 teams of (1 + 2 residents)
- Therapy starts in the third year
- ECT happens all the time
- Can be a bit of driving for rotations: example - Geriatrics rotation is an hour away in Topeka, but housing is available, Neurology or medicine could be at Leavenworth.
- There’s an emphasis on C/L, both built into the curriculum and by culture
- 4 months of medicine
- Might not be correct, but remembering no overnight call and home call only. Psych call beginning in 2nd year. Third year has 3 weekend calls all year.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Covered elsewhere

6. Location & Lifestyle:
I didn’t spend too much time in the area. Everyone I met had the friendliness expected of the Midwest. Cost of living is low. There are plenty of opportunities after graduation and many graduates stay in the area. Traffic is great, relatively. Google Fiber is here. Kansas City appears to be much cooler than it looks, but its looks aren’t that great.

7. Salary & Benefits:
15 vacation, 10 sick, 5 academic. Taken in chunks during the first year, more flexible later on? (might not be remembering that correctly).

8. Program Strengths:
-Works with the laws of two states
-Emphasis in C/L
-Residents are confident in training with a light schedule

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-Weird vibes from interviews
-Resident culture doesn’t feel as tight-knit

10. Overall Impression:
I left the interviews feeling poorly. It’s only a single day and logically, I give it the benefit of the doubt since it’s such a short glimpse at the program and incongruent with how satisfied the residents seemed. Residents did give the impression that they are less cohesive than other places, which is important to me.
 

clozareal

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Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and Regions Hospital – Twin Cities, MN

1. Ease of Communication:
Communication was through email. Scheduling was through Interview Broker. No issues encountered. There are two welcoming coordinators who will go out of their way to be helpful.

2. Accommodation & Food:
Hotel discount was provided. Interview day lunch was delicious chicken masala. Pre-interview dinner was at a resident’s house with catered food. The pre-interview dinner was a great idea. The atmosphere was informal and comfortable. It probably helps that I already knew people. Personally, I really, really like the current residents. The residents I met for the first time that night, I was thinking internally “Uhh… do you want to hang out this weekend?”

The 3 major themes seem to be:
1. Friendly resident culture
2. The faculty culture is incredibly positive and supportive of resident education and well-being – even off-service months. This is repeated by every resident and clearly evident in the way the faculty talks about the program.
3. Anything and everything will be seen with the 200+ bed facilities

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
10? applicants split into 2 groups of 5. One group started at Hennepin while the other group started at Regions. 10 minutes with the program director at Regions + 2 x 30 minute interviews with additional faculty. There were 2 x 30 minute interviews with faculty at HCMC. Tours of the two locations follow the interviews. Candidates can drive or be provided with taxi service for the switch.

The program director is down-to-earth, humorous, and invested in his job. He’s very approachable and I can easily see myself chatting him up. The interviews were standard and relaxed. Only one “Spirit Animal” question and the interviewer apologized for asking a silly question afterwards.

4. Program Overview:
- Sleep medicine fellowship is psychiatry oriented
- Moonlighting by the second year
- 200+ inpatient beds between HCMC and Regions: the patient population is very diverse
- Alumni end up at "named" places like MGH or Ann Arbor for fellowship
- Everything is electronic
- Has psych ER
- Extracurricular opportunities are there, research may not be on par with an academic "named" institution of course
- 2nd year is outpatient focused which is well-liked
- ECT happens all the time
- 2 months of medicine, 1 month of peds

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Covered elsewhere

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Post-graduation opportunities in the area are plentiful. The Twin Cities can get cold and snowy, but I’m no stranger to these conditions. Otherwise, traffic is traffic. The area has everything I would ever want and more. Some of the area has a prevailing hipster vibe.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Everyone: 5 academic, 3 sick days
Interns: 3 weeks of vacation, taken in 1 week chunks. One of the three weeks is taken collectively at the end of the year in June.
Beyond: 21 business days: 3 x 5 day chunks + 6 individual days

8. Program Strengths:
- Friendly resident culture
- Supportive faculty that are there to teach
- Training is deceptively strong, just doesn’t have a “University” tag

9. Potential Weaknesses:
- weather?

10. Overall Impression:
I feel at home here. No real negatives for my needs. I already have social connections. I really like the residents that I met and how fondly they speak of their time. Training is a high priority for the faculty. I only hope my excitement didn’t come off as artificial. This is a contender for my top choice.
 
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clozareal

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Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) – Portland, OR

1. Ease of Communication:
Communication was through ERAS. Scheduling was through ERAS system. No issues encountered. The coordinator is newer, but very pleasant.

2. Accommodation & Food:
Hotel discount was provided. Interview day lunch provided. Granola bars were available for the morning. Pre-interview dinner was happy hour finger food at a local restaurant. The residents that I met were humble, nice people. They pride themselves on caring for one another. The mood for the night and the interview day was slightly disrupted by the results of the election. There was a formal, academic feel for the program on interview day, but talking to the residents made me feel like the program is challenging in the good sense.

The 3 major themes seem to be:
1. Mutually supportive resident culture
2. Opportunities available and encouraged in every way: from hard science research to therapy focused to political advocacy. Cross-cultural community care came up most frequently.
3. Portland is awesome

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
8 interviewees split into two groups that switched between interviews and tour. In the middle was a lunch with many residents. 4 x 30 min interviews including one with a 4th year resident. Other applicants thought the tour had more walking than other places. Didn’t stand out to me, but might as well wear comfortable shoes or possibly bring alternative shoes. The program director is probably in the 95th percentile of humans in terms of amount of time spent smiling. The chair seemed formal and academic. Interviews were standard. There were more follow-up probing questions than elsewhere, but the tone was to get to know me better rather than judgmental.

4. Program Overview:
- OHSU is gorgeous and a new inpatient facility with psych ER off the hill coming in January
- Fellowships: addictions, child, forensic, geriatric, psychosomatic
- PRITE 30th percentile required for moonlighting
- Intern year is blocks of 3 months on psych or off-service
- 2 months medicine, 1 month EM, 1 month outpatient primary care
- Call intern is 2 short call/week + 2 x 12h Sundays for psych at the VA
- 6+ weeks of night float PGY2 and 2 weekend long calls/month
- PGY3 is 8+ weekend long calls/year + back up call
- PGY4 is back up call
- Didactics seem to be unprotected during off-service, but the schedule is designed to be skippable with the 3 month system
- Oregon frowns upon ECT and practitioners are limited, but OHSU does provide it and with everything else, can tailor to the individual’s interest

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Covered elsewhere

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Post-graduation opportunities in the area are plentiful. I spent some time after my interview day meeting locals and had a great time around the city. People are very kind. The public transportation appeared to be clean and efficient even with protests happening. One of the residents I met doesn’t drive.

7. Salary & Benefits:
3 weeks of vacation
3 weeks of sick leave, rolling
3.5 retreat days

8. Program Strengths:
- Supportive residents
- Opportunities in every direction
- Dat hill
- Portland

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-traffic, likely to be worse with time

Overall Impression:
I’m generally a positive person, so I hope my enthusiasm didn’t come off as disingenuous. I really liked this program. The residents at OHSU are a cohesive bunch that I find myself wanting to join. Portland is so handsome. It has a rhythm I’m not exactly used to, but can definitely enjoy getting used to. No real negatives for me.
 
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splik

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Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) – Portland, OR

4. Program Overview:
- OHSU is gorgeous and a new inpatient facility with psych ER off the hill coming in January
- Oregon frowns upon ECT and practitioners are limited, but OHSU does provide it and with everything else, can tailor to the individual’s interest
.
nice review -thought I;d mention a few things. ECT is limited across the west coast (similar if not more so in WA and CA) for obvious reasons related to human rights abuses etc. However OHSU does have an active ECT program and in fact they are hiring an ECT psychiatrist at the moment (which is quite unusual in itself). the VA does not have an ECT program currently. In the past they would send pts to seattle for ECT but now they contract with local providers for ECT.

The Unity Center is the new hospital that will be opening up in Jan. It remains to be seen how it will pan out. They are trying to create an innovative PES that is not run based on the failed medical/psychiatric model (i.e. it's not really a "Psych ER") and more actively helps people work through acute crises and have in-house case management services to get patient plugged in with the right services (detox, chemical dependency, housing etc). Because it is a joint project between 3 different organizations expect a lot of teething troubles. Many of the nursing staff and psychiatrists are already quite disgruntled so it will be anything but a smooth transition

I would not regard OHSU as an academic program, which is not necessarily a bad thing, depending on what you're looking for
 
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clozareal

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Yale - New Haven, CT

1. Ease of Communication:
They initially had an acknowledgement of the application about one day after it was submitted that gave me a heart attack. After that it was via email. No problems with scheduling. The coordinator is very nice and prompt. They gave us some resident bios and a pamphlet on living in New Haven via email, which was helpful. The PD also emphasized that they do not do post-interview communication because he felt it to be somewhat manipulative and unethical.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodations but they do have residency interview reduced rates at the hotels. Food was at a nice tapas restaurant and very well-attended by residents. Breakfast of muffins, fruit salad, and coffee. Lunch the next day was a higher-end Chinese place which was again well-attended by residents. Cookies and coffee in the PM wrap-up session.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Around 9-12 interviewees. Pre-interview tour the night before followed by the dinner. Interview day started at 7:30-45 and there was an introductory PowerPoint from the PD taking about the program's core values. Then we had two 45-min interviews and two 30-min interviews, one of which was with the PD or the aPD and the rest with faculty members. The interviewers asked very good questions and seemed interested in knowing about how I approached my activities. No weird questions. My interview with the PD had almost no questions about me, and it seemed like more of a session where he was able to tell me about specific opportunities and resources Yale had that matched the rest of my application. It was abundantly clear from all of my interviews that the faculty members had gone over my application in depth, so far as to reading some of my publications. I appreciated the 10-15 min breaks scheduled between my interviews. After that we had lunch and another tour of the facilities including the med school library. This was followed by a wrap-up with the PD. Interviewees interested in CAP had the option of staying for an additional info session on the program. Day ended at around 4.

4. Program Overview:
TONS of opportunities for inter- and intradepartmental collaboration. Yale psych is clearly integrated with the rest of the university. The program is extremely flexible and encouraging of residents to pursue projects and areas of psychiatry they are passionate about. There is a one-month "PREP" block in pgy-1 where residents start to explore this interest and then a 3-month "CASE" block where they actually carry out their projects. 100% elective time in pgy-4. pgy-3 is all outpatient. Affiliated with a psychoanalytic institute. No option to substitute peds for IM.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
My interviewers seemed to enjoy mentoring and supervision, and I had the impression that this is more of a warm and fuzzy place. Alums seem to have good fellowship placements and a number opt to stay on. There was a slide in the PowerPoint saying that many alums ended up becoming department chairs at other institutions.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
New Haven, which seems to be a negative for some but has its charm. Most residents seem to have cars. Some live in the suburbs, some live right next to the hospital in the "towers" and some live in other areas of New Haven. They said to not walk around alone past 1 AM but I didn't hear specific complaints about the crime or safety. The program seems family-friendly and some residents do have kids. Residents seemed very happy and not overworked. One resident was stand-offish but overall they were super smart, friendly, and interesting people. I heard them say "special place" many times when talking about their experience at Yale.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Starts at 68k for residents which is a generous salary to cost-of-living ratio considering it's New Haven and not New York. Residents had moonlighting opportunities but no specific need to moonlight. No 401k matching. Therapy is free if obtained within Yale affiliates. Residents can use Yale student gym and can also audit courses at the university.

8. Program Strengths:
Diversity in faculty, residents, and patient population (from Yale students to New Haven locals). Residents were generally cool people and clearly happy. The residents seemed to have good camaraderie despite it being a larger program at 16 residents per year. The program specifically tries to recruit IMGs and Pgy-2 transfers, which I think is fantastic. Multiple training sites including VA exposure. Good salary.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
New Haven isn't for everyone, NE weather, the flexibility might not be for everyone (???), no formal financial advising from what I heard. Maybe it isn't as shiny as MGH/McLean, though the program stresses leadership. That said, I don't think there are many weaknesses of Yale. I would say that it is more about goodness of fit.
 
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Seroquel

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**These are from a few weeks back so some details may be hazy **

Georgetown - District of Columbia

1. Ease of Communication:
Via ERAS and follow up via email with Sarah. Communication was iffy and I wasn't sure exactly what time to show up for dinner which was at Clyde's of Georgetown.

2. Accommodation & Food:
When I arrived to Clyde's the residents who were there didn't seem particularly friendly although they warmed up during dinner. About 6 other applicants. I really liked one of the residents. I would describe the food as New American and it was ok, burger was good. No dessert, spirits were purchased on your own. No accommodations provided or list of hotels as far as I could tell. DC hotels are super pricy, would recommend airbnb or hitting up that old friend from college you last spoke with years ago (what I did). Also recommend using lyft or uber to get around or using the rail system as it is pretty good and cheap. Breakfast the morning of consisted of yogurt, fruit, coffee, some juice. Lunch were sandwiches and some salad, which was really good.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Day started out at 8:30 am with breakfast followed by introduction with the PD and aPD. Should mention that the psych office is where you interview not the hospital. Also, the parking garage is tricky to find, definitely give yourself plenty of time to get here between parking and traffic. The PD is Dr. Akil who was super nice and easy to talk to. She gave a good overview of the program and the aPD spoke more about living in DC and his experience which was helpful. Interviews were with PD and aPD (everyone meets them) sprinkled with faculty and residents. My only "off" experience was with the faculty interview as they asked me a weird question that took me a while to answer. The rest of them were super chill and easygoing, especially the aPD. He's awesome. Afterwards we had a tour by one of the residents and this involved walking over a mile to the main hospital rather than taking a shuttle. Normally I wouldn't whine about this but I was wearing heels as was another applicant. We got to see the inpatient psych unit at Medstar hospital very briefly and then saw the medicine unit. I believe we also saw an outpatient clinic somewhere. We also got to see the Georgetown campus which is gorgeous. The resident leading the tour didn't really interact with us which I found odd. We then had lunch with some residents who showed up towards the end and we were able to ask some questions. I asked a few questions that were more specific and surprisingly did not get straightforward answers. Anyway, we then walked back to the psych office where some people had more interviews and there was an optional child fellowship q&a. Day ended with the chair saying hello around 2:30 or so.

4. Program Overview:
They give you a folder and a flip book with lots of info so I won't go into this but the salient points: 1) pretty typical PGY1 with inpatient psych and addictions, medicine, and neuro. You rotate at 3 different hospitals, the VA, Medstar, and Virginia hospital center. A lot of time at the VA. 2) Second year you continue inpatient psych, nightfloat, rotate at Washington hospital center for C/L and can do an elective. C/L is very busy 3) Third year is outpatient with forensics at Clifton Perkins hospital in Maryland. Fourth year is entirely elective time and you also must complete a scholarly project. They have added some changes to the curriculum over the years including allowing for more electives. I wasn't very clear on the call schedule but from what I can remember, during inpatient medicine you are on call one weekend and then off the next weekend. Inpatient medicine hours are noted to be intense. At the VA you are on call once every 5 weeks or so and I think it's only one day. Inpatient psych patients are not voluntary. This is true for all university-affiliated psych programs in DC. However, some units in the VA have involuntary patients. Moonlighting is apparently allowed but no one does it presumably bc of all the licensing/paperwork involved and also Georgetown does not allow internal moonlighting.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
The department has hired some new folks recently and they are making progress in terms of making this program better. The child & adolescent faculty and C/L seem to be doing the most research. The chair of the department is actually the president of the psychosomatic association or something. Residents mentioned the faculty being supportive.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Well, this is in DC which is a very expensive area to live in. Seems like most residents did not actually live in DC proper. Those with kids lived in South Arlington or Maryland suburbs. Rent is crazy here. A small studio in Georgetown might run you north of 2K. Even Arlington is expensive. That being said, DC is beautiful and there are tons of things to do. The Smithsonian museums are free, downtown DC is cool, and there are many michelin star restaurants. The rail and bus system is clean and accessible (no metro stop in Georgetown though). The vast majority of residents drive as you need to get to Virginia and Maryland for some rotations and the VA and Medstar hospitals aren't close to each other. Child care is ridiculously expensive here too and Georgetown does not provide any for residents. You do get food money while on call at the cafeteria which has a bar and good sushi. DC folks aren't the nicest. I asked for directions and this guy sniffed at me. Like ok dude, I'm not asking for your kidney.

7. Salary & Benefits:
  • PGY-1 $56,000
  • PGY-2 $57,000
  • PGY-3 $59,500
  • PGY-4 $61,000
Benefits: healthcare insurance, 2 weeks of paid vacation, I believe parking is free?? But it can be hard to find I was told..
* Step 3 is not paid for (a resident said no program pays for this which is false)

8. Program Strengths:
-Location ---DC is a great place to live
-Patient population is very diverse
-C/L is very strong here, probably the strongest fellowship
-PD is great as is aPD
-Proximity/connections to NIH (PD used to also have some role at NIMH)

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-NO MOONLIGHTING :eek::wow: They claim that it is available but you have to be licensed and when I asked who was currently moonlighting I was told that one of the fellows was. This is a huge turn off for such an expensive city
-Not sure how much I liked the residents. Some of them didn't seem interested in the applicants while I really liked others..
-Living in the DC area is $$$

*Overall: I wasn't sure what to think going in as I've heard mixed things from the program but I was let down during the interview day. It was disorganized and even though I heard many times that the best thing about the program were the people, I wasn't sold. Biggest turn off for me was the lack of moonlighting. I'm torn bc I felt a certain allure to the people/program but also felt uneasy.
 
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clozareal

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Cambridge Health Alliance - Cambridge, MA

1. Ease of Communication:
Mr. Lane is a new/interim program coordinator. Communication was easy and via email. Information packet was given several days before.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodations. Food was muffins, fruit, yogurt. Lunch was sandwiches, cookies, chips. Dinner the night before was Asian fusion and very nice, casual, at a resident's place.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
The day starts with an intro from APD and PD over breakfast in a community mental health building. Then PD drives us to the hospital where interviews with faculty take place. Long interviews-- 1 hour each! My interviewers asked thoughtful and challenging questions. I heard that the PD asks particularly deep questions. Then we had a lunch with residents, a tour, and then two more interviews, one with a resident. Finally ended with a wrap-up session from the APD and PD where the PD emphasized that there would be no post-interview communication from the program. The day ended at 4:30 PM.

4. Program Overview:
This is a unique academic community program. 3 months medicine in first year. 1 month neuro and 1 month behavioral neuro. You also get 4+2 weeks of elective time during which residents can do whatever they want (travel internationally, study for step 3, read books, write). No call in PGY1, call q2wks in PGY2/3. PGY3 is all outpatient. No call PGY4. Overall cush schedule.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Accomplished and warm, accessible faculty who seem to all love teaching and supervising residents!

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Cambridge, MA is a nice college town. I can't imagine driving there because the streets are laid out in a ridiculous fashion but it seems like only half the residents have cars and a car is really only needed for one rotation at one of the farther-away hospitals. Residents seemed very happy and well-balanced with many interests outside of medicine. Many were able to have children during residency despite small class size. All the residents are in therapy of some sort (some in analysis) and it is basically a $5 copay.

7. Salary & Benefits:
$1900 educational stipend that is tax-free. There is additional funding and 5 days to attend/present at conferences. This is a unionized residency so although I don't remember specifics about benefits residents said they were very good. The salary is average for that of programs in Boston.

8. Program Strengths:
Very cohesive resident class. Cambridge is a nice area. Very established and clear in their mission (community psychiatry). The PD is very experienced. Opportunity to receive supervision from renown staff (Judith Hermann etc). Huge emphasis on psychotherapy of all modalities and lots (maybe 8 hours a week) of supervision. In-house moonlighting starts in PGY2 as backup call. Very nice, deep/thoughtful and experienced program director. Graduates of this program go on to good fellowships and other job placements. Amazing diversity in patient population and clearly THE place to go for community psych and general saving-the-world.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Inpatient CL, not for people who want to do bench lab research. I could see this program being too touchy-feely, hippie-dippy for some folks. Since this is a community hospital, the facilities aren't the shiniest. High cost of living in Cambridge and Boston. Also not a fan of driving in Boston.
 

Seroquel

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The University of Chicago - Chicago, IL

1. Ease of Communication:
Invite and scheduling via ERAS and silence until like 2 weeks before the interview. My neuroticism got the best of me and I ended up emailing the PC a week after I didn't hear anything like "do I still have a spot???" lol. But they send a detailed schedule and info about where to park and stuff.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodations provided. Would recommend the International House on campus as it is cheap ($60 or so) and within walking distance to the hospital but might fill up early. Hotels aren't too crazy $ in the downtown area and depending on where you are, bus travel won't take too long. Dinner the night before was at an Asian place, can't remember the deets. Approximately 8 other applicants. But several residents showed up and it was fun. Breakfast the day of the interview was from Panera I think. Lunch was delicious Mexican food that I may or may not have had multiple helpings of (hoping I don't pop out of my suit by the end of this interview jaunt).

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Day started at 8 am. It was difficult finding the conference room so don't be shy and ask people where to go. During breakfast the PD and education director came in and gave overviews of the program. Dr. Cooper is the PD who is really great and I immediately liked him. After we had our interviews which are in different hallways so pay attention to the room letters. All of the interviews were very chill. Like I barely got any questions. At this point of the interview season I think I sound like a robot so def put some pauses in there and inflections before answering questions. But everyone talked a lot about the program and I really liked this approach bc like my entire soul is already in the application so it should be about telling applicants about the program. So go UChicago. Anyway, you interview with faculty, a resident, and Dr. Cooper and Dr. Spitz who are just lovely people. After, we had a tour led by a hilarious resident. The main hospital is beautiful. We did not get to see the two off campus hospitals but you can arrange to see them on Fridays. Also, you can sit in on the didactics which is amazing and I think more programs should do this. I was able to really see how the residents interacted and they are a great bunch of folks. Lunch was very well attended and the residents were approachable and chill. They didn't ask us if we had questions but instead just offered info but we spent most of the time talking about other stuff. Some more interviews in the afternoon followed by a quick wrap up with the PD. Day ended at 3:15 pm.

4. Program Overview:
You get a folder with lots of info. This is an academic program with about 6 residents/year so on the smaller side. First year fairly normal, you do rotate at UChicago for neuro and inpatient med and C/L which is supposed to be super busy, Lakeshore hospital, and Northshore. Second year is more inpatient psych and C/L, with 2-3 hours of psychotherapy patients per week. You have a faculty member who serves as a mentor throughout your time in residency. Third/fourth years are outpatient with a lot of flexibility. Can get ECT exposure. Lots of cool clinics like personality disorders and memory. New updates for the program: 1) Ingalls hospital, recently purchased by UChicago, will have inpatient psych unit(s) and is expected to open July 2017. They will likely send the Lakeshore hospital patients here instead but keep the Northshore rotation. 2) New psych ER beds once the level 1 trauma ER opens (2017 I believe). Call schedule is as follows: intern year --> shifts until 10 pm/week, 2nd year --> overnight call 1X/week. No call after that, in-house moonlighting available.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
This is a program that looks to be going through some changes in a positive direction. There is active research in neuro-psych, genetics and imaging, amongst others. They don't have a forensics fellowship but several forensics faculty including interim chair. You get one-on-one mentoring which is great.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Chicago is rather affordable for a city of its size. They give you a map showing where all the residents live. Some live in downtown, some north of Chicago, and a few in Hyde Park. Most residents own a car as the commute is long for some of the sites but you could use public transportation. There's lots to do in Chicago and as a foodie I would be happy here. Most of the residents I met were married/in relationships.

7. Salary & Benefits:
  • PGY-1 $55, 219
  • PGY-2 $57, 727
  • PGY-3 $59,837
  • PGY-4 $62, 595
Benefits: 20 days of paid vacation, etc

8. Program Strengths:
-Faculty that is truly accessible
-Great PD
-Cohesive resident classes, people who really get along and like each other
-C/L is excellent here
-Chicago
-A cushy program in terms of hours, call frequency

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-Training sites are a bit far in terms of commute, even with the new hospital

*Overall: Had a feeling I would like it, ended up loving this program. I got a really good vibe from interacting with residents who were a hilarious and fun group of people, and the faculty. I think I would fit in well here. Does seem like this program is getting more competitive, most of the other applicants that day were from prestigious universities. Current bae for sure.
 
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clozareal

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Loma Linda University - Loma Linda, CA

1. Ease of Communication: Emailed in first week of October to schedule through Thalamus, which I absolutely love since it makes it easier and less awkward to schedule and reschedule. Interviews were offered on Mondays from 11/14 – 12/9 (6 total interview dates of 14 per interview day). Received info about interview dinner a few days before the interview along with the interview itinerary.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodations provided. Pre-interview dinner was at a local Thai restaurant that was delicious with a 3-course meal. Residents were extremely friendly, but some were kind of cautious about saying negative things about their program to the point of telling other residents that us applicants weren’t “interested in that part” of the program. I got kind of a weird vibe from that, but it might have just been that residents. Most of them were really down to earth.

Also, apparently they have a separate interview dinner/recruitment events for Loma Linda medical students as well as Western University (DO school in Pomona, CA). I am not from either school so I can't comment on those.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
The day started at 7:15am, the earliest of any of my interview days. Received the interview schedule in my packet the morning of. There was breakfast with healthy fruit, yogurt, granola, coffee (this was surprising because I had heard caffeine wasn’t allowed), and orange juice. We were given an introduction by Dr. Lee (PD), Dr. Pereau (APD), and Dr. Murdoch (Chair) that provided us pretty standard information about the residency, including the hospitals, call schedule, benefits, etc. I had two 1-hour interviews, and then two 20-minute interviews. It was clear that they had thoroughly read my application and had many positive things to say. The interviews were very conversational but somewhat probing into my past/childhood at times, which was fair game because I had written about it in my personal statement. I felt that these interviews were extremely personable and some of the friendliest faculty I have met on the interview trail. The only unusual question I got was about spirituality and how I think that I will deal with working in the Adventist population given that I wasn’t Adventist. We got a tour of the outpatient facility we were in, and then walked across the street to the inpatient psych wards.

We had lunch with the residents who all seemed really friendly and they all remarked at how much volume they saw, how hard they worked, but how much of a work-life balance they still maintained. Then we had a tour of the LLU facilities on a chartered shuttle. The VA is brand new and pretty nice, and we only passed by the other facilities without stopping given that we only had 45 minutes for the tour. At the end, Dr. Lee gave us a remark about the Match procedure and how he doesn’t tend to give much post-interview communication. He referenced two papers on Match Ethics that he put in our folder, which says basically applicants should choose how they want and programs should too and they shouldn’t try to coerce each other by expressing high interest. The day was done by 2:15pm

4. Program Overview:
This program seemed solid. There are four sites: two outpatient (LLU and BMC) and two inpatient (VA and BHI). There are a ton of community psychiatry opportunities, including a clinic in a poor area of San Bernardino (SAC Health System), Norton (Family Medicine 1 month), Patton State Hospital (3 month continuous jail psych rotation), and Global Mental Health that the residency pays your salary during your time away (Lesotho and Guam were the two mentioned but pretty much anywhere Adventists are located which is a ton of places). Call schedule is above average for a residency program and residents let it be known that if you don't want to work hard, then don't come here. Didactics seemed somewhat sparse and they are working to revamp their curriculum with resident support. Grand Rounds is in a small-ish conference room with about 15 seats, so you might not get lots of formal lecture style teaching. Residents said most of their education comes from informal talking with the attendings and many said they studied on their own free time to catch up to speed.

There are 8-10 residents per year, depending on how many decide to fast track into child psych. The more that do, the more residents they need to cover call. This year, they are recruiting for 9 residents. Their intern class has 6 people from Loma Linda medical school and 2 people from Western, and all of them are male. They remarked that this was just how the match went last year and the program had no control over it.

The most unique aspect of their residency program is spiritual care. They have required didactics on religion and spirituality in patient care. There are monthly evening meetings, annual spiritual renewal retreats, and a senior certificate in spiritual care. You do NOT need to be Adventist to be at this program. About ¼ of residents are Adventist and about 1/3 of the medical school here is Adventist. The residents remarked that they felt very welcomed and supported by faculty in their exploration of this aspect of clinical care that is important to patients, and often ignored by many clinicians.

Psychotherapy seems average with some opportunities to pursue additional electives in it. No formal psychoanalysis institute affiliation. Also, research is pretty lacking, especially in basic and translational science. However, there is some clinical research being done and accessible to the most self-starting. Residents mostly match where they want to for fellowship, and mainly in Child & Adolescent (>90% match rate which I’m not sure if that’s good or not), but there are no fellowships offered within the institution. They are trying to get accredited for a Child and Adolescent fellowship though. They indeed have ECT if you want to learn it.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Faculty seemed to be extremely approachable and always available. Faculty seemed to be very involved in resident life and often host get togethers at their houses. They are not involved in much research, but faculty do tons of psychotherapy and community work. One faculty took residents to Jordan to learn about refugee mental health. The APD is the one who wrote the Ninja PRITE exam guide.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Loma Linda is nestled in the Inland Empire in California, about 1-2 hours away from Los Angeles. Many don’t live in Loma Linda since it’s hard to break into the Adventist community if you are not part of their church. Residents live mainly in Redlands, which is a suburban town of 70k that is super cute and extremely affordable compared to other places in California. Many residents say they live within a few miles of the hospital and some live a few blocks away. You’ll definitely need a car here. There’s a downtown area that has a farmer’s market, a night market, cute coffee shops, nice boutique stores, and plenty of good dining. There’s the University of Redlands nearby and even though it’s not too crazy of a night life, residents say they do go out to drink and have fun often.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Salary go from $53k in PGY1 to $60k in PGY4. Health, dental, and vision are offered but residents need to partially pay for premiums for themselves and dependents. Full access to the Loma Linda University gym and all facilities provided by LLU. Two conference days in PGY-1 and it goes up by 1 day every year. 10 sick days. 3 vacation weeks first year and then 4 weeks the rest of the time. Moonlighting is $300 per shift (6 hours), which is pretty low for most residencies, but can start PGY-1.

8. Program Strengths:
• Residents work hard and learn a ton with lots of volume
• Residents seemed to really enjoy each other’s company and didn’t seem burned out
• Program is extremely flexible to any family circumstances that may arise and vehemently supports a strong family life (part of their Adventist culture)
• Community psychiatry is pretty strong with access to some of the sickest in San Bernardino County
• Strong jail psychiatry experience at Patton State Hospital (forensic hospital)
• Psychotherapy is particularly strong, especially in CBT. There are many other modalities provided as electives (existential, DBT, play, MFT, psychodynamic, family, individual)
• Resident-centric program director and an awesome assistant program director
• Facilities are fairly new and pretty nice compared to other psych facilities
• Spiritual focus of clinical care, which can be extremely important to patients
• Relatively cheap cost of living with a cute downtown area that has a small town feel
• Can start moonlighting PGY-1 after finishing a 2-month inpatient rotation
• School districts are great (the two Academies in town), town is safe to live in and good for families

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Spiritual focus if you are not at all religious or open to it
• You’d have to try hard to find research, which can be a plus for some
• Lack of any formal fellowships within the program
• No established mentorship or advising program
• Lower amount of didactics and formalized curriculum
• Call is on the heavier side
• Moonlighting pays pretty low compared to other programs
• The Inland Empire isn’t as glamorous as Los Angeles
• It gets HOT in the summer (>100 degrees) with many weeks over 90 degrees
 
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clozareal

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Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (previously Harvard Longwood) - Boston, MA

1. Ease of Communication:
The program coordinator is super nice and responsive. Communication was via email. No difficulties there.

2. Accommodation & Food:
Probably the best interview trail dinner I've had yet at a nice restaurant in Boston. 3-4 residents attended. Significant others are invited to attend, which I thought was a nice touch because people are often making these decisions about residency with significant others in mind. Breakfast was fruits and muffins, bagels. Lunch was sandwiches from Au Bon Pain.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Five 30-minute interviews. No difficult or probing questions but my interviewers has definitely read over my application and were interested in getting to know me. Honestly, I felt like the last two interviews were superfluous because we had ample opportunity to get our questions answered and meet residents throughout the day. Those interviews mostly consisted of the interviewers telling me more about the program as opposed to asking questions about me. The day was broken up with a lunch with residents and a tour. The day ended from 2:45 to 3:45 depending on the order of your interviews / breaks.

4. Program Overview:
Highlights include the fact that in light of the recent split between BWH and BIDMC each resident class will have 10 residents (Longwood was previously a total of 15). This might mean less call for folks in both programs. Scholarly project required. Selectives encourage residents to find an area of interest or passion and they are given dedicated time to pursue this interest throughout residency. 2 months of neuro with option to substitute one month of peds neuro. Next year the incoming class at BI will do 4 months medicine at Metro West, which is 45 minutes away. BI has more eating disorder referrals compared to BWH. Emphasis on longitudinal psychotherapy starting in PGY-2, and also group therapy. Research track available-- you apply in PGY2 and then do research in PGY3-4.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Dr. Sams, the PD, and Dr. Whittmann are very warm. My interviews with them were very conversational and interesting. It sounds like faculty members are generally approachable and supportive. Residents happy with supervision.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Boston, which is expensive. Patient population generally white and insured. About half the residents have cars and some live near the hospital, some further away. Some are single and some are partnered. Residents did not seem tired and they all seemed very happy and cohesive. Many residents go on to do academic fellowships and end up in academics.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Salary starts at 61k I believe. Moonlighting options in PGY-4, not all residents moonlight but some did say it was competitive to get moonlighting shifts. About 1-2/3 of residents in psychotherapy.

8. Program Strengths:
Resources that come with a Harvard affiliation. Good CL. Caring, responsive, reasonable and experienced program directors. Good psychotherapy (my impression was that BIDMC might have more of a psychotherapy emphasis than BWH, but have not interviewed at latter so can't be sure); affiliation with Boston psychoanalytic institute.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Possibly less diverse patient population. Apparently BIDMC is less prestigious compared to BWH, although this was something I heard offhand and not through my interview directly, and besides, I'm not sure his matters. Boston is expensive. While affiliated with Harvard, the program itself does not seem to have as much interaction with the rest of the university (which is across the river in Cambridge anyways) as it does with the other hospitals.
 

clozareal

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Stanford – Palo Alto, CA

1. Ease of Communication:
Message through MyERAS mid-October with 6 interview dates in Nov and Dec asking me to rank my preferences in an email back. There was also an Area of Interest form to fill out. Notified of Happy Hour following the interview day in the initial email communication. Email with schedule of interview day and interviewers was given the evening beforehand.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodation provided, but link given with all hotels in the area with prices after the Stanford discount. I stayed with a friend in the area and used Uber to get in, which was super quick and easy. Parking pass is provided for the day if needed. Breakfast and lunch had lots of healthy options (fresh fruit!), coffee, and tons of variety in drinks and food.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
The day started at 8:00am. Very organized schedule given the day before so we can look up our interviewers. The academic services administrator was waiting for us when we arrived and took us to this nice conference room with lots of healthy snacks and coffee. The packets we were given were extremely detailed, and included an Academic Psychiatry journal, in which the department chair Laura Roberts is the Editor-in-Chief, as well as a very impressive 140-page journal about all the psychiatry projects going on at Stanford and each faculty member there. We started off with an hour orientation from Dr. DeGolia who is the APD and then we meet with the PD/Chair. There was a chartered shuttle waiting for us to tour the Palo Alto VA hospital next. Some people had interviews here, others didn’t. The Palo Alto VA is probably the nicest hospital that I’ve ever step foot in. The psychiatric ward has 20 beds per unit with 4 units there, and each unit is beautiful. Residents get capped at 8 patients and faculty take care of the rest. The rooms were clean, the hallways nice, and the common area had foosball, a ping pong table, billiards, a beautiful courtyard, a nice flat-screen TV, and so much more. The recreation therapy for the patients in the afternoon was golfing at the Stanford Country Club, which apparently residents have free (I was told) access to. We had a shuttle to the Stanford University Hospital next where we went to the inpatient psych units, which were less beautiful than the VA but still very nice. The patients were wearing pajama looking scrubs with Stanford emblems on it. Apparently they get many Stanford undergrads and graduate students, who come from all over the world, which implies (as I was told) that the patient diversity is wide.

We went to Grand Rounds where they had a guest speaker come in to talk about a topic in psychiatry. There were so many people at that Grand Rounds that it was standing room only, which I interpreted as a strong psychiatry community. Some of my other interviews had Grand Rounds where it was barely one or two dozen people present. Afterwards, we had lunch with the residents and then sat in on the first part of their didactic session.

Then followed a battery of interviews. They really tried hard to match your interviewer to what you ranked on your Area of Interest form, which was an amazingly personal touch that made it much easier to have conversations with the interviewers about common interests. There were a total of 5-6 interviews depending on the schedule, where you meet with the PD, APD, a resident, and other faculty members. Overall, it was a very conversational feel where most the faculty knew my application inside and out. There were two interviewers however where it was clear that they did not read my application beforehand. At the end of the day, there was a wrap up session and feedback session about how the interview day went with the APD, which was great. The interview day ended at 5:15pm. We went to a restaurant in downtown Palo Alto for happy hour afterwards, which had amazingly delicious food. I was so tired by this point from 2 tours, 6 interviews, and PowerPoint presentations that it was hard for me to be as socialable, but the residents seemed to be very well-balanced and enjoyed their life despite working hard. They seemed incredibly impressive from their backgrounds, their scholarly project they were working on, and how much they loved Stanford. We were done with dinner around 8:00pm.

4. Program Overview:
The program seems to really cater to whatever the residents want to do with strong individual attention and a family feel while still having high standards. The Program Director and Chair have really made resident education an increasing priority among the faculty at Stanford and there seems to be a lot of buy in. They work all over nearby counties including San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Monterey, and Alameda.

PGY1: standard medicine, neuro, inpatient psych. Outpatient starts first year. Four weeks of night float. 4 weeks of psych ER. They recently got kicked out of the psych ER at Santa Clara County Hospital (faculty who wanted to teach left, remaining faculty didn’t want to teach residents) and they’re working to partner with Santa Cruz County Hospital (?) to work in their psych ER, but at this point it’s unclear whether this partnership will develop. In any case, the psych ER experience may not be the best here given the recent developments.
PGY2: 3 months inpatient, 2 months geropsych, 2 months C/L, 2 months scholarly concentration (this was the unique aspect!), 1 month assessment methods for research (this is also unique), 1 month addiction, and 1 month night float.
PGY3: All outpatient! 12 months continuity clinic (VA or Stanford), 12 months long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (IPC) and CBT (in child, psychopharm/mood, community psych in underserved clinics, or in SMI/psychotic disorders), and 12 months of scholarly concentration. Other outpatient clinics include SMI, clozapine clinic, doing prolonged exposure with the PTSD clinical team, telemental health clinic, or addiction pharmacology clinic. Moonlighting starts this year, but not sure how much they get paid.
PGY-4: 6 months of 50% selective and 50% scholarly concentration, and then 6 months of 100% selectives (Kaiser Redwood City, Vaden Student Health, chief residency). Continued outpatient long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (IPC). Outpatient clinics include advanced depression, advanced bipolar, OCD, women’s wellness, geriatric, neuropsych, psychosomatic, ECT, and general evaluation.
Graduates: About 1/3 find academic positions, >1/3 do community and <1/3 do private practice.

I would say that the program is very resident-centric in terms of developing a scholarly project as long as it promotes the development of critical thinking skills. This can be anything from getting more clinical exposure (child, DBT, HIV, etc), community outreach (one resident was partnering with local schools to teach coping skills), research of course, global health opportunities (Zimbabwe, Belize, Guatemala, India, and Jordan were some of the named places), extra psychotherapy training (Feeling Good Institute with David Burns or Existential Psychotherapy with Irvin Yalom), developing education curricula, and anything else you might think of (one resident worked with the design school to build an ICU space to decrease risk for delirium). It seems as though you can really develop projects and have strong faculty support for this. Some residents have done additional degrees such as PhDs, MBAs, and MPP/MPA with the support of the program. Other residents chose to pursue psychoanalysis training with the Palo Alto Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program or the SF Center for Psychoanalysis.

Changes from the past years: psych ER is currently in limbo, increased psychotherapy teaching by faculty, increased community psychiatry opportunities (thanks to Steven Adelsheim who was recruited within the past 3 years), expanding global mental health program.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
World-class faculty. The Chair, Laura Roberts, is a force to be reckoned with. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Academic Psychiatry and has published at least 3 psychiatric textbooks every year for the past several years (there was a postcard in front of her office with that list). We were given a 140-page booklet highlighting the psychiatric department, including the research labs and the community involvement from the psychiatric department, which shows how much they’ve been doing. There are 519 department faculty and an additional 381 department staff. They publish 400+ in their department every year from 159 funded research projects.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Palo Alto is definitely more of a suburban feel and even the downtown area is just one street with boutique shops and fancy restaurants. That said, it’s a safe place to live, the school districts are great if you have kids, SF is about an hour away, you have access to all the Stanford University perks, such as the gym, sports events, cultural events, and lots of hiking/outdoor activities.

7. Salary & Benefits:
The highest salary of the California programs. PGY-1 salary starts at $62,587 for 2016-2017 and goes up to $74,755 by PGY-4. Add the housing allowance of $500 per month for all residents and fellows. There’s also a one-time moving allowance of $3,000. You get reimbursed for Step 3, CA medicine license, Med license renewal, and DEA. Education expenses up to $2000 per year. Work expenses of $1000 per year (cell phone, mileage, meals on duty). Vacation of 3 weeks/year plus 1 week of educational time. Health insurance is fantastic with NO co-pay for visits or prescriptions (WOW!), and you can choose between the Stanford one (Aetna?) or Kaiser. Access to two gyms on campus (rock climbing anyone?), Stanford Division 1 sports games (need to buy tickets), unlimited access to BART/Caltrain/local buses, Stanford Country Club for golfing, etc. There’s also subsidized university housing on campus if you get lucky in the lottery.

Salaries with housing+relocation allowance included:
PGY1 - $71,587
PGY2 - $71,748
PGY3 - $76,761
PGY4 - $80,755

8. Program Strengths:
• Very resident-centric and family feel with high standards
• Lots of flexibility in schedule so you can cater it to your individual interests
• Dedicated time for scholarly concentration with 2-3 months in 2nd year (unique to this program)
• Lots of internal fellowship opportunities, which means access to faculty who are experts in those fields (C&A, sleep, neuropsych, addiction, etc.)
• Access to world-class faculty (David Burns with CBT, Irvin Yalom in Existential Psychotherapy, Laura Roberts in Ethics, Jose Maldonado in Psychosomatics, Karl Deisseroth in Optogenetics, David Spiegel in Hypnotherapy, and much more!)
• Beautiful location and facilities where the weather is always perfect due to strange microclimate magic, and only <1 hour from San Francisco
• Highest salary with probably the most amount of fringe benefits in CA
• Psych research is extremely strong with many diverse opportunities for basic science, translational, clinical, and community research
• Psychotherapy seems strong, especially in psychodynamics and CBT - lots of elective time to pursue other modalities if desired

9. Potential Weaknesses:
• Lack of formal mentorship and advising program
• Community psychiatry is improving, but no firm county hospital experience
• Lack of Psych ED experience given recent ousting from Santa Clara
• Potential lack of patient diversity, but residents say that they see foreign students to Google executives which provides for a bigger range of diversity
• Probably still need a car to get around since no one seems to take the public transportation
• Palo Alto is still really expensive, even with the higher salary and housing allowance, and is a sleepy suburban town.

10. Overall impression: Definitely a strong program that offers lots of fleixibility to shape your own path! I would put it in the top 3 in California, especially if you want an academic career. Program seemed very well balanced between biological and psychotherapy with access to world-class faculty mentors. You can customize your training to maximize your own growth in whatever way you see fit. Stanford University has incredible resources and facilities, and there’s lots of cultural and sports events. The location and weather are fantastic.
 
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clozareal

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Thanks everyone for the submissions!! Keep them coming! Feel free to send them to me and I will post them for you if you wish to remain anonymous!
 
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Seroquel

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Thanks everyone for the submissions!! Keep them coming! Feel free to send them to me and I will post them for you if you wish to remain anonymous!

Here I was thinking you went to all of these places lol
 
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clozareal

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Here I was thinking you went to all of these places lol

Haha yeah maybe I should have put "Anonymous Review" on the reviews that I was sent via direct message except I doubt anyone cares if they're anonymous or not.
 
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TheFuture_22

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Haha yeah maybe I should have put "Anonymous Review" on the reviews that I was sent via direct message except I doubt anyone cares if they're anonymous or not.

Yeah, I was like, "Damn, Clozareal is going all over the place." Lol


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 
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FireBurns

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I love that Hennepin County got a good review, I really enjoyed my interview there 4 years ago, they were literally just finishing construction on the new psych building, still had that new psych hospital smell! (the newest and nicest one I saw on 20 interviews). Working in a nice building constructed with forethought for patient care is a benefit not to be overlooked. Aesthetics and functionality? Yes please.
 
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clozareal

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Penn - Philadelphia, PA

1. Ease of Communication:

No issues, although I don't like it as much when programs use ERAS exclusively to communicate with applicants because my phone browser doesn't reliably load the ERAS website. Responsive and very nice program coordinator who was helpful throughout the interview day.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodation. Dinner at an Italian place the evening prior. Breakfast was ABP bagels and pastries. Lunch was catered assortment of grilled veggies, salad, sandwiches, chicken, cookies-- good-quality food.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
The day began with an intro from the PD, APD, and two chief residents in a conference room that was sort of tricky to find-- it was nested in the diabetes and metabolism department and initially I thought I had gone to the wrong place.

I was interviewed along with a gigantic group of candidates... maybe 14-16 other people. We were split up into two groups with one having interviews before lunch and then the tour later in the day, and vice versa.

We were transported to another building to be interviewed. People had 5-7 interviews pretty much back to back, though some interviews were rather short. I did not get any unusual or challenging questions during the interview day; they were all very conversational and people were extremely friendly. It was clear that all of my interviewers had read my application, including my personal statement. I also noticed that the PD and APD met with every candidate (as opposed to splitting up the candidates such that a candidate would meet with either the PD or APD). There was also one group info session that you were given depending on specific interests you specified on a form that was sent out with the interview invitation.

The tour involved going on a Penn shuttle bus and included the VA and CHOP. The tour guides were awesome! If you have luggage, you might be lugging it around on/off the bus. Lunch at midday was well-attended by residents. The day concluded at 3:30 with a wrap-up.

4. Program Overview:
Hospitals include Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (C/L, outpatient, and psych ED), Penn Presbyterian (22-bed inpatient adult unit, addictions, C/L), VA, world-renown Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
Didactics are protected, half days in PGY 1-2 and half days with some additional spillover into additional days in PGY-3-4. Residents mentioned they are reworking some of the didactics with a new eye towards trauma.
Integrated psychopharmacology and psychotherapy training; residents start with first psychotherapy patient in PGY2. Modalities include psychodynamic, couples/family therapy, CBT, groups, assessment clinic. Affiliated with Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.
PGY1 has 4 months medicine, 1 month neurology and option to substitute one month of peds at CHOP. 15 weekend call shifts/year, no overnight psych call (you'd take medicine call but not sure what it involves).
PGY2 is 11 months psych, 1 month neuro. 15 weekend call shifts/year. PGY3, 4 are outpatient. PGY3 includes night float 2 wks/year, 6-7 weekend call shifts/year. No call in PGY4, elective time increases to 2 days/week and pursuing scholarly project.
Tracks include psychotherapy, CAP, clinical research, ethics, public psych, quality improvement.
Some options for international and rural electives.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Maria Oquendo from Columbia and current president of the APA is taking over as department chair next year. Other accomplished faculty include Raquel Gur in neuropsychiatry, Aaron Beck and Judith Beck, Edna Foa. Faculty supportive and accessible.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Philadelphia. Winters are a thing here. It felt like several parts of the campus / city were under construction. About all the residents have a car, though they did report that public transportation was adequate. Some described it as a miniature NYC, but you know Philly is a real city because people don't describe it as "it's close to Boston" or "it's close to NYC." Decent art and food scene, easy to meet people if single. Family-friendly program.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Some subsidized housing if residents live in university city. Gym membership. Therapy is a $20 copay and about half of residents are in therapy during residency. Moonlighting opportunities in pgy-3 and 4. Residents are paid $100/hour and shifts are 12-14 hours, reported increasing salary by up to 30%.
Salary starts at $56k and increases to $64k by PGyY-4.

8. Program Strengths:
Good program director with 20 years of experience. Strong faculty members. Balanced psychotherapy and psychopharmacology (maybe a slight lean towards biological?). Strong NIH research funding. Happy, normal and accomplished residents with a touch of hippy-ness. Good C/L in top hospital. Academic, if that's your thing. Good VA exposure. Larger university affiliation. Some flexibility with electives, though not the most flexible I've seen. Philly isn't a bad place to live.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Some residents mentioned that they wanted to improve didactics. Residents are encouraged to attend conferences but their educational fund is only $200 which does pale in comparison to that of some other programs. Philly isn't bad, but there are also probably better places to live.
 
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clozareal

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Brigham and Women's - Boston, MA

1. Ease of Communication:

Run through Thalamus and received an interview invite with no spots when I logged on, so had to be on multiple waitlists. Email stated that spots are historically likely to open up and ultimately ended up working out fine (I had a spot within 2 weeks). Katie (the PC) is super nice and easy to coordinate with

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodation (stayed with a friend, so not sure if there were discounts on hotels- i think). Dinner was at Eastern Standard in Boston, MA, and far more formal/high end of a place than a lot of my dinners have been. Breakfast and lunch were both ABP and there were cookies and coffee before the end of the day. All well attended by residents (but very few interns encountered).

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Day started with PD sitting and just chatting with us about the program and framing his talk as not wanting to bore us with stuff we could read online. Talked more about what the split from Longwood and that they were excited to start a new program with the strong academic backing and history of an already established strong program. Fourth year resident talked about her experience and her positive feelings towards Brigham and then Dr. Silbersweig (the department chair) joined and talked from his perspective (ill talk more about this later- but he is awesome!)

5 scheduled interviews, plus Dr. Silbersweig decided to spent 15 minutes meeting with each of the people who weren't scheduled to interview with him in addition to the ones that were (which was super nice and one of my favorite conversations)..this may just be scheduled now because this was one of the first days when they were still figuring things out. All interviews were super chill and conversational. Everyone met with the PD and APD

Next was a tour and lunch with residents. Then more tour. I walked three miles while on my interview so keep that in mind for shoe choices. In the afternoon there was a closing and then you had an option to see more things/meet with a specialist in your interest after that. I opted to go check out the inpatient psych campus and got to chat with one of the chairs over there and see the wards. There is a shuttle that runs back and fourth

4. Program Overview:
To echo Dr. Boland, most of this is on the website. Things that stood out to be were the emphasis on neuroscience as well as the emphasis on scholarly work. There seems to be endless opportunities at Brigham, so they work hard to help you find your niche.

Now that there will be 10 residents at BWH and 10 at BI, the residents seem to feel there will be significantly less call for you to cover in comparison to what longwood residents do now. Most of the ones we met (self-selecting group?) seemed to favor BWH over BI, as well. Inpatient psychiatry done at the satellite campus). Otherwise, rotations done at the main campus at longwood. Many residents rotate through cards because they feel this is super relevant to psych given cardiac complications of many psych meds. Still an affiliation of Mass Mental.

Also notable for my fellow CAP interested applicants- two of the incoming interns at Brigham will be selected to do a 5 year fast track program, which lets them not only do their medicine rotations as pediatric rotations at Boston Children's, but also have a guaranteed spot at Boston Children's for fellowship. This is not a separate track and these people will be chosen after they get into the regular adult residency (but apd seemed to hint that there would be contact with these people prior to match to let them know they were on the radar? or at least that they would have people in mind before match).

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
It's BWH- everyone is accomplished in the field. Almost to an overwhelming extent. Thought that it was very telling that Dr. Silbersweig was so involved on interview day and also so humble and excited to meet applicants. He seems like an amazing guy and all of the residents rave about him and his accessibility. Dr. Boland also seems very accessible and excited for the new program

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Boston- haha. Lifestyle, im not too sure. The residents gave the vibe that they work ALOT. Not sure if that would be different with the longwood split.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Pretty typical benefit and salary package, from what I remember.

8. Program Strengths:
New program that seems receptive to feedback, but also isn't really new because it's a world renowned hospital and they've had a residency before. Amazing chair who is big in the neuropsych field, so definitely an emphasis on biological, but still carved out time and emphasis for psychotherapy training. Lots of flexibility to carve out a niche with lots of support and resources. Diversity of patients.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Got the vibe that the residents were overworked (though happy, overall), could maybe feel a "little fish in a big pond". I think, as these all are, it just comes down to fit. This is definitely an urban program and not many residents have cars. There is an emphasis and research and contributing to the field. Overall, very strong program.
 

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University of Maryland/Sheppard Pratt

1. Ease of Communication: Initial contact through ERAS. Scheduled a date through ERAS which was subsequently confirmed with an email from the coordinator. A week prior to the interview another email came from the coordinator to confirm my RSVP for the dinner the evening before the interview, with the restaurant information attached. I also received an email from a PGY4 over a week before the interview to ask if I had any questions, and to let me know that he would be available throughout the interview day, (which he was. he was there in between our interviews and for the tours of the medical center and of sheppard pratt which was really helpful)

2. Accommodation & Food: No accommodations provided but many hotels nearby offered discounts. Dinner was at a Lebanese Restaurant on the harbor, very good. lots of vegetarian options and lots of food. Bagels and yogurt and coffee in morning. Lunch was chicken, rice and salad. Lunch came around 1pm which was a little late and it seemed like a lot of the applicants were getting hungry.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): 7:45 start time with overview from the PD for about an hour, with 9 applicants and the Senior Resident who was with us for the day for questions. He gave a very detailed overview and went over the curriculum pretty extensively. Then we had three 30 minute interviews, I had two with faculty and one with a resident. All were conversational. They only asked me minimal information about my application, although it was clear that they had read it. I found the conversations to be forced -like a lot of awkward pauses that I felt I was having to fill. I just didn't click with them maybe? Seemed very traditional. Then we took a tour of sheppard pratt, which was approx 20 min drive away. The hospital and the grounds are very impressive. Hard to get a feel though for the teaching that goes on there. I get the feeling it is more of a shadowing role during the rotations there. It clearly a huge name in psychiatry but i'm not sure if I would want to train there, as opposed to send patients there for help, or get an attending role there later on in my career. After that it was back to the downtown campus for lunch. there was 5 residents maybe there? 6? seemed like a low turnout given the class size is 16. only 2 interns were there. And I only met 1 intern at the dinner. Seemed odd to me. At some of the smaller programs I have been to so far, there have been way more residents turning out for the dinners and lunches, sometimes equaling or outnumbering the applicants which is nice. I wish there had been more at the lunch. Also again the conversations felt a little forced.

after lunch the group split into two groups- one took a tour of the UMMC, and the other had 15 minute exit interviews with the PD which were conversational and gave time for any additional questions. then the groups swapped and we were done a little after 4pm.

4. Program Overview: Very good detailed info on their website. Essentially like most other programs, PGY1 has 6 months med/neuro, and 6 months psychiatry. Of note, the medicine is done at Mercy Medical Center, and not the at university of maryland medical center. residents said this hospital was very nice, all single rooms and the highlight for them was that there is free food there and its really good. didn't get much sense for the didactics. also there is call all 4 years here. seemed call heavy, despite the large class size. all the residents said they liked it, and it made them feel really prepared. the PD said he even recently added additional call to PGY1 year per request of the residents so that they would feel more prepared for pgy2 when they were running the show. The residents seemed to have a good work life balance, and when i specifically asked about the workload they said they felt good about it, but then I was just confused more more didnt come to the dinner or the lunch. As far as moonlighting, they said they dont really do it. there are opportunities for "extra training" which is paid and some do that. sounds like you pick up extra call shifts and depending where you get paid for different things. like paid per admission something like 70 dollars or so but dont quote me on that. and those opportunities are 3rd and 4th year.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
A lot of the faculty I met were trained there and stayed. they all speak glowingly about the program and their time there. seems to be a lot of room for research as well. PD trained there and stayed. he seems genuinely invested in the program and making the residents happy.
6. Location & Lifestyle: Baltimore seemed a lot nicer than what the reputation is. lots of new construction, new restaurants etc. two sports teams right downtown in walking distance of the hospital which is super fun. the residents said they go to a lot of games. most of the residents seemed unmarried, only one first year with children it seemed. seemed like the classes mixed well and people were friends with people in other classes, but they also admitted its difficult to get to know everyone at first because half of the interns start on psych and half start on medicine. but this is pretty standard across most programs im visiting. some people lived downtown, lots of neighborhoods to choose from, but some lived closer to DC if they had a spouse working there.
7. Salary & Benefits: $52,469 - $59,937. They pay for your travel and expenses if you present at a conference.

8. Program Strengths: -large class size - 16. class seemed very diverse too. Don't have to stress about coverage for sick days or weddings, weekend trips, babies etc. Good in house fellowships. 6-7 spots for CAP.
-sheppard pratt - 322 beds
-rotations take place at many different places, so you get lots of exposure. VA, UMMC, Sheppard Pratt, State Hospital.
-lots of community involvement.
-2 psychoanalytic institutes near by.
- cost of living seems reasonable
-not far from DC, Philly, NYC
-working on adding more international electives (currently have 2, one in england and i'm blanking on the other)

9. Potential Weaknesses:-large class size
-baltimore isnt the safest (but could be a good thing if you want to work with underserved like I do (high homeless and HIV)
- call all 4 years without a lot of moonlighting opportunities.
-lots of sites spread out, you definitely need a car
- seems very traditional (good and bad)


Overall I was impressed with the program and facilities, but just got a weird feeling overall when talking to people. As I mentioned, conversation seemed forced a lot. I couldn't get a sense of how happy the residents were and how much they worked. I wish more had showed up.
 

slappy

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who know? ignore me, im just being silly and hating on milwaukee, they have at least historically, had pretty decent service (in fact its not really a Psych ER at all which is what makes it so good). i would imagine it would provide a fine educational experience. i think the problem is being in that environment is great for learning as a wet behind the ears intern hungry for experience managing acute psychiatric crises and getting greater autonomy, i would be unenthused about doing it as a PGY-3. it would much less of an educational experience at that point, but it would be better for patients as presumably you'd be more confident, have some psychotherapy skills, and be better at managing suicidality etc, but it would be far less of a learning experience.

Actually MCW has their PGY2 and PGY3 schedules switched. PGY2 is the outpatient year (so you get to follow psychotherapy patients for 3 years instead of 2), and PGY3 is the predominantly inpatient year. Most programs I know have their ER and night float rotations in this year, so it's nothing unusual. Also, disagree that practicing doing full crisis evals and developing autonomy would be a better learning experience for an intern than a third year.
 
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slappy

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University of Maryland/Sheppard Pratt

- call all 4 years without a lot of moonlighting opportunities

More important than the call frequency is the amount of work you do while on call (and when you're not on call). If you're considering ranking this program high, I'd strongly suggest doing a second look, and talking to the PGY2 residents there.
 

slappy

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Brown University/Butler Hospital

1. Ease of Communication: Interviews scheduled online through Thalamus. No issues. Had to change my date and was able to contact PC directly to change it - even though all dates were shown to be full on Thalamus, she had one available.

What on earth is Thalamus? Is this a new ERAS thing? Thank you for the detailed review. It's a very underrated program IMO.
 
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slappy

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NYP-Cornell has a small but specifically arranged for acute psychiatric patients Psych ED (next door to the main ED within the hospital) staffed with psychiatry attendings and residents. They also have a few (5-6) beds for extended psych ED stays (I.e. someone who's not getting admitted right away but may need 72 hour observation).
Bellevue has a famous psych ED separate from the main ED and staffed by psychiatrists.
Just a couple of examples from NYC. It seems like psych EDs are not unheard of in some parts of the US.

Agree. They'd probably meant that MCW has one of the largest freestanding psych ERs in the country, second only to Bellevue. 11,000 patient visits a year translates to over 30 patients a day. That's high volume.
 
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slappy

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Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and Regions Hospital – Twin Cities, MN

10. Overall Impression:
I feel at home here. No real negatives for my needs. I already have social connections. I really like the residents that I met and how fondly they speak of their time. Training is a high priority for the faculty. I only hope my excitement didn’t come off as artificial. This is a contender for my top choice.

Too bad this is an anonymous review. The PD's probably wondering who this is now to rank you higher! ;)
 

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Sorry about the multiple posts, finally finished reading all the reviews. It's kinda despicable that there are so few reviews on this thread, considering it's late November already. Come on 2017 applicants, step up your game!
 
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clausewitz2

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Actually MCW has their PGY2 and PGY3 schedules switched. PGY2 is the outpatient year (so you get to follow psychotherapy patients for 3 years instead of 2), and PGY3 is the predominantly inpatient year. Most programs I know have their ER and night float rotations in this year, so it's nothing unusual. Also, disagree that practicing doing full crisis evals and developing autonomy would be a better learning experience for an intern than a third year.


I don't know, I started my intern year on a psych ED service, and while I'm not going to say it made me confident as such, it made me a lot less liable to panic when unexpected things happened on other services and made me much more comfortable with determining when I did and did not need to call on someone more senior for help.
 

clozareal

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I'm surprised you got this impression. What're you comparing the program against? They have lots of labs, and do pretty good work.

This was an anonymous review so I'm not sure what he/she comparing it against.
 

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University of Wisconsin-Madison

1. Ease of Communication:
Initial communication through ERAS. I was given a list of all interview dates to choose from (rank 3 and the PC will get back to you). PC responded very quickly.

2. Accommodation & Food:
Program paid for Double Tree hotel on UW-Madison campus. Excellent location for exploring Madison if you can get here a little early the day before. The night before the interview, there was a meeting at the outpatient facility with the chair, PD, APD, several other faculty, and other residents. Plenty of hors d'oeuvres were served. Afterwards, applicants and 6 residents went to get appetizers at a bar. Interview lunch was fancy sandwiches, salad, cheese platter, and chips.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Probably the most friendly interview experience I've had so far. Interviews are on Fridays lasting from 7:30-3:30pm. 4x 30 min interviews with residents or faculty. Every applicant also meets with chair, PD, and APD for 15 min each. All of the interviewers seem to have looked at my application. Tour of facilities after lunch. Ended with psychotherapy discussion and cider + cookies with an attending.

4. Program Overview:
Good overview on website. Inpatient facilities are on the small side. More outpatient focus than most programs I've seen. Outpatient year is during pgy2. Pgy3 also has 4 half days per week of outpatient. This should be a great longitudinal experience for those who are looking for strong outpatient training. 1 hr supervision per week with a randomly assigned therapy supervisor during pgy2. Can get more supervision during pgy3. Psychotherapy seem to lean more towards CBT and other manualized therapy.

Did not get complete details about call but it seems average. When on psych, interns have about 1 call (weekday evening shift or weekend day shift) per week and night float (forgot how many weeks). Pgy2s have q9 overnight(?) call with a few weeks of answering after-hours outpatient calls. Pgy3s have overnight(?) call around 1-2x a month.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: Faculty seem very friendly, given that they even went to meet with applicants the night before interviews. Some research going on.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Madison is a pretty college town that has decent public transportation (buses). People who ride the bus are mostly UW students, who get free bus passes. UW is located downtown and there are always lots of undergrads walking around. Lots of people in town commute by bike. Housing is affordable but more expensive than other Midwestern towns of its size. Can get a 2-br for around $1200 or less if you go a little farther from downtown/campus. Residents are a mix of single, dating, and married. They seem close and do things together outside of work. There is also a resident association that organizes monthly activities, which could be a good way to meet residents in other specialties.

7. Salary & Benefits:
56.5, 58.5, 60.7, 63
3 weeks vacation. Parking at UW hospital costs $500-600 per year. Some people bike to work and there might also be a subsidized bus pass residents can buy.
Moonlighting at in-house location is capped at 12.5k/yr because it is a state facility

8. Program Strengths:
-outpatient experience
-friendly faculty who seem willing to teach
-strong residents (they keep lots of UW med students)
-residents seem pretty close and hang out after work
-Madison

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-job market in Madison is fairly saturated
-in-house moonlighting is capped at 12.5k per year
-parking costs $500-600, not a ton of perks like money for step 3
-have to do 1-2 month peds heme-onc rotation
 
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clozareal

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Sorry about the multiple posts, finally finished reading all the reviews. It's kinda despicable that there are so few reviews on this thread, considering it's late November already. Come on 2017 applicants, step up your game!

We have more interview reviews posted than the last 5 years at this point in time, with the exception of maybe 2013-2014. Totally NOT despicable, although I do appreciate the public shaming.

Feel free to send me your reviews to publish anonymously! Do it now before you forget and all the interview day details blend together!
 
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clozareal

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UC Irvine - Orange, CA

1. Ease of Communication:
Message through MyERAS mid-October with 16 interview dates in November, December, and January asking to schedule the interview through email. Included hotel options, air travel information, address, and parking instructions in the email.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodations provided but hotel recommendations were for places right across the street. Strong presence from residents at the interview dinner (El Torito), which combined two interview days into one dinner. Residents seemed to be really cohesive. Oh, and you have to pay for your own drinks if they are alcoholic.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
First of all, this program is NOT in Orange. Orientation began at 8:00am followed by 5 interviews, lunch with the residents, a Q&A with the program director and chair, and then a tour of the facilities. Behavioral interviewing is a tad bit intimidating, so look up the structure and how to do them beforehand. We wrapped up by 3pm.

4. Program Overview:
I had read reviews and heard rumors about how UCI was in disarray and to be highly suspicious. I kept my eyes open and remained extremely skeptical of their program. However, I did not find any strong evidence of anything worrisome that would detract from a strong residency training program – the dust has definitely settled.

The website is out of date as of today. The new department chair (Dr. Ruth Benca) has been there for less than a year, but has already brought in lots of financial resources and has been active in recruiting lots of new strong faculty. She is an expert in sleep medicine and hopes to build a world-class academic sleep medicine center at UCI. This is the second year for new PD (Dr. Adrian Preda), who I thought was extremely personable and has a great sense of humor. His grandiose vision for UCI is for it to become the best psychiatry program on the west coast, and is actively working to make it so. There is a good balance between psychotherapy and biological psychiatry. The psychotherapy is particularly strong in psychodynamic and CBT, and there is an optional weekly Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) seminar that is 2 hours a week with Dr. Douglas Khan, who trained with the founder of ISTDP and has a private practice in Newport Beach, where residents are expected to read 60-pages a week and watch patient encounters he records while analyzing it using ISTDP principles. Residents said they went through 6 books on psychodynamic and psychoanalytic therapy last year.

Clinical training seems pretty solid. There are 46 inpatient beds (18 adult, 14 med/psych, and 14 adolescent) and a partial hospitalization program for adolescents. They are starting up a PHP for adults too. The hospital is not resident dependent and there are faculty always present. They're also working on opening up Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) hospital beds for inpatient child psychiatry too. The Child and Adolescent department is growing and they are getting a new division chief soon. They have started a forensics fellowship and have geriatric and addiction fellowships in the works to start up in the next few years. They are moving their EMR system to Epic next year.

Residents didn’t seem to have complaints with access to faculty or teaching. They actually said the opposite – they had their attendings’ phone numbers and call/text them often. The UCI med students I met during other interviews also thought the same and said the residents are cohesive. The one complaint I heard was driving between the long beach hospital and the UCI medical center in Orange, which is about a 30-minute commute on good days. Also, the program is trying to increase number of outpatient centers around Orange County. The patient diversity seems pretty average. Program guidance is also pretty average and relies on residents to be self-starters since there's lots of flexibility in the schedule. I hear that UCI has some of the highest volume of medical students going into psychiatry because of how much they loved their rotation, which speaks to the quality of the psychiatry department.

The UCIMC is pretty new (opened in 2009). We didn’t get to tour the Long Beach facilities. The resident workroom is big and spacious. They have a new serenity room next to the resident workroom that has nice couches (great for napping!), yoga mats, and was a beautiful room just to relax. No dedicated psych ED. Cafeteria closes late (10pm) and seems to have a great selection. I found it interesting that the staircase is outdoors and you have to go outside from the units to get to another. This would definitely not work in a place that snows/rains often, but speaks to how good the weather always is. The Orange County Psychiatric Society is very strong and well connected, and many UCI psychiatry residents and faculty are involved in it, which can connect you to private practices and county systems.

PGY1 – Psych (5.5m of inpt psych + 1-2wks of night float), medicine (1m EM, 1-2m inpt med, optional 1m peds, 1-2m outpt med), all call is at UCIMC (have to drive there in horrific traffic if finishing up in Long Beach), no call off-service, short call once a week, 1-2 weekend call per month
PGY2 – Inpt psych (3-4m), geriatric (1-2m), C/L (2-3m), Substance Abuse/Forensic (2m), inpt child (2m), night float (5-6 wks), 1st weekly therapy patient with supervision, 2-3 short call/mo, Saturday overnight call every 2 months
PGY3 – Outpatient clinics (schizophrenia, PTSD, general, mood/anxiety, clozapine, addiction), therapy (CBT, ISTDP, can start psychoanalysis with 2-year certificate program, psychopharm) with 7 therapy patients, call is q1m short call, external moonlighting starts this year and you find it by word of mouth
PGY4 – Orange County Behavioral Health (community), lots of electives, no call
Graduates – CAP fellowships, attendings, around 1 private practice, lots of community

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Chair is a big sleep researcher and wants to have residents do more sleep medicine during rotations. She brought a ton of grants with her when she arrived at the beginning of this year. There is a weekly 2-hour ISTDP seminar run by Dr. Khan, a private practice psychiatrist who was trained by the psychiatrist who developed ISTDP.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Orange can be a fun suburban city. Some residents live in Long Beach and others live in Irvine. Orange County has a ton of outdoor events, great diversity in good food, right next to Disneyland, lots of music venues around, a big theatre presence at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, lots of shopping (Fashion Island, South Coast Plaza), and about an hour from the beach. Rent for a 1BR apartment is about $1200-1800. Most residents live in Gateway Apartments, which is a 10-minute walk away.

7. Salary & Benefits:
The website info is out of date as of today. The residency program got unionized recently, and benefits increased after the contract was finalized about a month ago. PGY1 starts at $53,947 and goes up to $60,212 in PGY4. Meal plan of $40/mo (it’s something I guess?). Housing allowance of $2900 per year if you live within 10 miles of UCIMC or affiliated site (Long Beach VA). Professional license of $1000 for CA med license and Step 3. Educational fund of $1000 for books, conference, etc.

8. Program Strengths:
• Flexibility to tailor schedule to your individual interests
• Strong psychotherapy with an optional weekly 2-hour seminar with a psychoanalyst
• New PD is excellent and new dept chair brought a ton of financial resources to UCI along with recruiting lots of new faculty
• Lots of psychopathology as they are the safety net hospital given there is no county hospital in all of Orange County
• Residents are down to earth and seem really cohesive
• Get to be part of a rapidly expanding program
• Great location if you like a suburban environment with terrific weather

9. Potential Weaknesses:
• New chair and PD who both plan to stick around and have lots of changes that they want to make so there’s some uncertainty, but all changes seem positive
• Lots of traveling between the two sites that are about 30 minutes away driving
• Lack of current internal fellowships
• Lack of formal advising and mentorship program, but they are starting one
• Lots of impressive new faculty, but they are still getting used to the system
• Research may be lacking, but can definitely be found
• Lack of internal moonlighting
• Public transportation isn't good and will not take you between Long Beach and UCIMC

10. Overall Impression:
Despite the recent grumblings about how this program was in disarray, I did not feel that at all during my interview day. In fact, I found the opposite to be true. Residents seemed really happy here and the clinical training seems solid. The UCI med students I've met confirmed this, and many are hoping to stay. The additional structured psychotherapy seminar seems like a huge draw to anyone wanting to learn ISTDP. It might not be the best place for heavy research or if you want to moonlight a ton of hours early. This programs feels very much like the new kid on the block, but they are also growing fairly quickly. It's exciting to imagine being part of that rapid growth.
 
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Merovinge

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University of Wisconsin-Madison
9. Potential Weaknesses:
-job market in Madison is fairly saturated
-in-house moonlighting is capped at 12.5k per year
-parking costs $500-600, not a ton of perks like money for step 3
-have to do 1-2 month peds heme-onc rotation

The job market in Madison is fairly saturated but also has a fair amount of population willing/able to pay cash for psychiatric services. I also personally know 2 folks who have started working in Madison in the past 12 months so it is not unheard of to get a position in the city.

There are also other not inhouse opportunities for moonlighting, so don't let that cap overly scare you.

Parking is a necessary evil to pay for. Even the head of neurosurgery pays for his/her parking.

Lastly the children's hospital and it's peds services are a great experience to rotate on. I did adult heme/onc and peds child abuse as an M4 and both rotations were deeply meaningful and I still use information/skills related to both to this day.

*I have no ties to UW except for being a graduate from the medical school but it is a great program that would fit a lot of folks needs!
 
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clozareal

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UC Davis – Sacramento, CA

1. Ease of Communication:
Initial invite through ERAS, and then confirmed with follow up ERAS messaging. Communication was prompt, no issues.

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodation. They provided a list of hotels in the area. Dinner at a nice restaurant and very well attended by residents. Breakfast was minimal, some coffee and pastries. Lunch was catered with veggie options.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Introduction by the PD, Dr. Koike, with some brief overview of the program and what they value. The chairman also came in to share his views with the interview group (~6 of us total). He spoke quite highly of the psychiatry department and its role at UC Davis. Points included the robustness of the department and high level of respect at the school. ~5 interviews at about 30-45 minutes each.

Very conversational and it was apparent that everyone had read my application. Overall, I got the impression that one thing they valued were healthy, supportive residents that would continue to foster the environment of wellness.

4. Program Overview:
Forensics, Psychotherapy, Work-Life Balance. I think that these 3 areas are the strengths at Davis that I picked up on. Their website lists the specifics of what rotations are expected during each year. But for forensics, you have excellent training opportunities due to rotation sites at the jail (very popular), plus the fellowship leadership is integrated. Psychotherapy is emphasized with good supervision. For those interested in psychodynamic training, Davis will pay for your coursework with the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute for Tuesday sessions. They will accommodate your schedule to allow you to travel back and forth (this is ~2.5 hours each way!).

Pretty solid group of residents. They appeared very happy and satisfied with training at Davis. The PGY 1’s had voiced an interest in having an Emergency Medicine month for their intern year, and although they weren’t able to coordinate it for them, the administration implemented it for the following years. This speaks to the healthy channel of communication between residents and administration.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
There is the MIND institute for those interested in neurodevelopmental research. Also, if you have a research focus, they offer a separate half-day interview to meet people in your area of interest. Lots of NIH funding so there are a wealth of opportunities to explore within that arena. The Program Director is new in that role, but has been with the program for many years. So he is keeping the same tradition going and overall, I got nothing but warm respectful vibes from him. Very open door policy; residents mentioned that you could reach out to faculty and feel like they were supporting you every step of the way.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Sacramento is centrally located to many amazing things, like Tahoe, San Fran, Napa (all within 2-2.5 hours driving). But the city itself was a grid of residential and governmental buildings with highways dividing neighborhoods throughout. It is no doubt affordable though, and many of the residents mentioned that they live in luxury apartments because their salary carries them much further here than elsewhere (think bay area). The city of Davis is nearby, ~25 minute drive? Just as a point of clarification, this program has very little to do with the undergrad campus and city.
Lifestyle seemed very decent. Residents are outdoorsy people and have the time to take advantage of the location. They are also very cohesive group and enjoy doing things together.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Salary of 53k, 55k, 57k, 60k. They offer a moving allowance which is huge. Opportunities to moonlight once you get your license.

8. Program Strengths:
Healthy vibe from everyone I encountered. There are ample research opportunities. Low cost of living comparing itself to other California cities. Incredible Forensic training. Strong psychotherapy focus. Job opportunities available for graduates to stay in the area.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Location maybe more than anything. Sacramento isn’t as nice as maybe some of the bay area cities, but it's grown significantly and has a great coffee and beer culture.
 
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Seroquel

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Forgot to post this, seems fitting to do so today.. congrats to the BUCKEYES!

THE Ohio State University– Columbus, OH

1. Ease of Communication:
Invitation via email by the PC Joenna Cynkar who is very organized. I got info on the program several weeks in advance of the interview which is much appreciated :thumbup:

2. Accommodation & Food:
No accommodation; I airbnb'd it which was cheap. Dinner the night before was at an Italian place called Carsonie's with I think 5-6 other applicants. Food was ok. There were a couple of residents present who did a good job answering questions. Felt very information-session-y but also casual. Morning of they served breakfast with yogurt, granola, bagels, etc. Lunch was Chinese which was ok.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
Day started out with me spending I wanna say 20 minutes trying to find parking. The OSU campus is really big and I'm not used to navigating such a large campus. Anyway, the psych building is right next to the parking garage so it's a quick walk. Make sure to take the parking ticket with you as you will need it later on to get out. Introduction was done by one of the chief residents who went through a powerpoint. After, we had our interviews with the interviewers coming to get us. Interviews were with faculty and residents, a total of about 4. No difficult questions, a lot of "why Columbus" "why OSU" which, I honestly dream about answering one day to these programs, like, I need to match so I applied to all the midwestern programs and you're in the general vicinity of the region I want to end up in :rolleyes:. One of my interviewers was on their phone for much of the interview which I thought was kind of rude. And then proceeded to be confused by parts of my application. Interview with the PD Dr. Niedermier was great, I really liked her. Lunch was very well-attended by residents from all classes including interns. Residents were very honest about the program which is rare. Main gripe was the parking situation in OSU, which is really an institution-wide problem. One resident (I think PGY-2) said he worked 55 hrs per week. Hours go down during 3rd and 4th years. After, we had a tour by a resident who was really funny. We saw the ginormous James hospital, which has too many floors tbh. Lots of great food options inside, Wendy's, ABP, solid cafeteria, Panera and Starbucks close by. The ED has dedicated psych space. The psych consult service was widely regarded as being super busy and getting busier each year. We saw the inpatient adult floors in the Harding hospital which is the psych building. We then met the chair in the conference room who was again honest about the program. He said the child & adolescent faculty and research were probably the strongest aspect of the program. Day ended around 3 pm, Joenna gave us OSU mugs with buckeye chocolate inside :)

4. Program Overview:
This is a solid midwestern program with many fellowship offerings including recently reinstated child & adolescent, forensics, sleep medicine, community psych, psychosomatic, pain etc. Residents were mostly MDs but some DOs too, most were married. Curriculum set up is traditional, with residents saying the first year vs second year is a toss up in terms of difficulty but that it substantially gets better. None of the interns looked tired at lunch. First year internal med set up is lighter on the hours and involves 2 months of consult where you work one-on-one with a hospitalist which is clutch bc I hate internal med with every fiber of my being, 1 month on family med which is very cushy per residents, and 1 month elective. Neuro is 1 month consults which is super busy and 1 month as outpatient second year which is cushy. Call schedule: first year cover weekends (1 day every 4 weeks) plus 6 weeks of night float, supervision provided. Second year is again 6 weeks of night float. Third year about 10 or so overnight calls. Fourth years provide back up support. Moonlighting is great here, internal opportunities abound without need to be licensed/pass tests. Quite lucrative in terms of money made. Med students on most if not all rotations, so teaching possibilities if that's your thing.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Child & adolescent faculty probably strongest in terms of research and education. Opportunities for ECT training, psychotherapy training. Faculty appear approachable and warm.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Columbus is very typical for a midwestern city. It's very affordable; several residents owned homes in the area and had kids. Not sure how I feel about the city. Columbus is a very cookie-cutter, suburban-sprawly college football town with a sprinkle of diversity in the form of Nepalese and Somali refugees. The singles scene isn't the greatest imo from what I've heard. Drivers are absolutely atrocious here so I think my road rage problem would increase exponentially. OSU is a huge, huge campus with tons of undergrads. Maybe a + or - for some.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Salary:
Yr 1 51,000
Yr 2 52,536
Yr 3 54,216
Yr 4 56,075

Benefits:
-Pays for step 3
-On call money
-Dry cleaning
-Ipod touch
-Good $ for books

4 weeks paid vacation, day care service, solid health care plan, etc

8. Program Strengths:
-Pretty much all fellowships available
-Solid program, great chair and PD who are warm
-Residents got along and were nice and easy to talk with
-Affordable city to live in
-Moonlighting is lucrative and easy to obtain

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-Research geared towards child & adolescent psych
-Some diversity in Columbus but not a lot

*Overall: I think this is a great program that I will rank very highly. I'm not sure if my personality meshed well with the residents I met, not that they weren't nice, but maybe I'm too eccentric lol. But this program has everything I want plus the winters are mild in Columbus.
 
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Agree. They'd probably meant that MCW has one of the largest freestanding psych ERs in the country, second only to Bellevue. 11,000 patient visits a year translates to over 30 patients a day. That's high volume.
I'll say, 60k visits a year is enough to be a medium-large sized (medical) emergency department. (The REALLY big ones are 100-120k.)
 

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Maine Medical Center
1. Ease of Communication: initial communication via email. PC often responds to emails in less than 2 hours.

2. Accommodation & Food: Program paid for 1 night at Morrill Mansion, a lovely B&B 1 block from Maine Medical Center. No dinner the night before. No breakfast before interviews, so get food from the B&B beforehand (they have oatmeal, hard-boiled eggs, french toast and other baked goods, fruit, various beverages, etc.). Lunch day of interviews is with two residents at a restaurant called Hot Suppa a few blocks away from the hospital. Very tasty brunch and lunch options.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): They interview 1 applicant per day from 8:30am-3pm. Interview day starts in the outpatient building with a 1 hour meeting with the PD, who gave me an overview of the program with ample time for questions. Then, I walked around to various other buildings to interview with faculty or residents, had lunch, then drove to Spring Harbor Hospital for my remaining interviews. I had 5x 30 min interviews with 3 faculty and 2 residents.

4. Program Overview: A large range of experiences available. There are excellent didactics and supervision for psychotherapy. Adult, developmental disorders, C&A inpatient units are at Spring Harbor Hospital, a free-standing psych hospital few miles from Maine Medical Center. Spring Harbor was built a few years ago and looks new and spacious. Outpatient facility is in an older brick building next to Maine Medical Center. Residents get large offices with windows in this building. The ED (psych has its own section with 4 rooms), geri/med-psych unit, and C&L service are at Maine Medical Center.

Call is a bit lighter than average, with about three weekday shifts (4pm-8pm Mon-Thurs or 4pm-8am Fri) per week and one 12-hour weekend shift per month during pgy1. The call in later years is less frequent. 1 month of evening float per year (4pm-midnight Sun-Thurs) for pgy1-2. The call only covers services at Maine Med. Spring Harbor is covered by attendings and moonlighters.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: PD is a friendly guy who would be nice to work for I think.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Portland is a touristy New England city that is especially beautiful in the summer. The restaurants are decent for small city. Nature is very accessible. Several ski areas ranging from 1-3 hours away. Housing in the city proper is fairly expensive because ever increasing numbers of people have discovered how awesome Portland is. The Portland area seems like a great place to raise a family. There are many towns/suburbs a reasonable commute away from Portland, such as Falmouth and Yarmouth, that have good public schools. The majority of residents are married with kids. Residents are friendly with each other but don't do much together outside of work. As many as half of the residents stay in Maine after training.

7. Salary & Benefits:
Salary is on the higher end, starting at 56k. However, Maine has a high state income tax.
4 weeks vacation + 1 week education time. Residents get $1500/yr for psychotherapy.
In-house moonlighting is available at Maine Medical Center or Spring Harbor. Maine Med pays $50/hr (increases to $65 if nobody signs up). Spring Harbor pays $100/hr.

8. Program Strengths:
-Good variety of clinical experiences (child, geri, developmental disorders, etc.)
-Psychotherapy training
-Evening float instead of night float
-Portland

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-Cost of living (housing, taxes, winter heating) in Portland
-Job market in Portland is somewhat saturated, though a sizable fraction stay in/near Portland
 
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