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2018 - SGU Clinical Selection for Texas Residency

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Clutchcity88

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My wife is currently in term 5 and is finalizing clinical rotation selections. From what I’ve read Texas has specific ACGME clinical requirements for obtaining residency in Texas. My question is how are we to choose an affiliated hospital if not ALL rotations are ACGME accredited for one single school. She was looking at Arrowhead or St John, however both don’t offer Pediatrics and Psychiatry, respectively. Do they expect her to live in California one year (attend Arrowhead) and then relocate to to Michigan (St John)?

I’m not understanding what they mean by their “recommendation” of supplementing with a 4th year elective. Must she complete ALL rotations under ACGME accreditation for acceptance into a Texas residency?

“For those planning on seeking a residency in Texas, SGU recommends a fourth year rotation on a service with an ACGME residency in the disciplines for which the hospital does not have a specialty-specific residency. For example, the absence of a pediatric residency in the 3rd year program can be supplemented by a 4th year elective on a service with an ACGME pediatric residency. Following this recommendation will address the Texas requirement. Additionally, graduates that are board certified, regardless of their training in medical school, are eligible for licensure in Texas.”
 
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bedevilled ben

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My wife is currently in term 5 and is finalizing clinical rotation selections. From what I’ve read Texas has specific ACGME clinical requirements for obtaining residency in Texas. My question is how are we to choose an affiliated hospital if not ALL rotations are ACGME accredited for one single school. She was looking at Arrowhead or St John, however both don’t offer Pediatrics and Psychiatry, respectively. Do they expect her to live in California one year (attend Arrowhead) and then relocate to to Michigan (St John)?

I’m not understanding what they mean by their “recommendation” of supplementing with a 4th year elective. Must she complete ALL rotations under ACGME accreditation for acceptance into a Texas residency?

“For those planning on seeking a residency in Texas, SGU recommends a fourth year rotation on a service with an ACGME residency in the disciplines for which the hospital does not have a specialty-specific residency. For example, the absence of a pediatric residency in the 3rd year program can be supplemented by a 4th year elective on a service with an ACGME pediatric residency. Following this recommendation will address the Texas requirement. Additionally, graduates that are board certified, regardless of their training in medical school, are eligible for licensure in Texas.”

Not all of the clinical centers affiliated with SGU have residency programs in all specialties. That doesn't preclude you from doing your clerkships there, but your wife will need to supplement her 3rd year clerkship with an elective in 4th year at another ACGME-certified residency program. I'm not familiar with Texas-specific license laws, but that is my interpretation of the bit you quoted (please someone correct me if I'm wrong.) When I was doing my clinicals, it was possible to schedule your own electives at a non-SGU affiliated hospital by filling out a form and getting school/hospital approval. I am not sure if this is still the case, but it may be an option for fulfilling that requirement if she would like to stay in Texas. That being said, this is one of the challenges going to a Caribbean school. You often have to bounce around at different facilities to meet state licensing requirements or to even meet the school requirements. This is why many students (myself included) chose to come to NY for our clinicals, because it is much friendlier to IMG's/FMG's, and there are tons of hospitals in the city that are affiliated with SGU and can meet those requirements.
 

galactus

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For Texas, the bottom line is in order to get a license in the state, one of two things need to happen
1. EVERY rotation has to have a residency/fellowship attached. Pediatrics rotation must be under a peds residency. Cardiology elective must be under a cardiology fellowship, etc.
2. If #1 didn't happen, then you have to get board certified first.

You can do residency in Texas, but when it comes to licensing after training, one of the 2 options above have to be met. The issue with #2 is that in order to be board certified, one must finish residency and pass the boards. One of the requirements of being board certified is that you need a state license! If you can't get one in Texas, you'll have to get a state license somewhere else (like NM or OK), then apply to Texas. The OTHER issue is that depending on your specialty, passing the boards can take up to a YEAR after residency training to be board certified. Some specialties only offer the board exam ONCE a year, others have written and oral boards that you have to pass, so if a person who didn't have all their rotations done at an ACGME accredited residency/fellowship, matched into a program in Texas, they may have to leave the great state of Texas to practice for an entire year before coming back.

Hope that clarifies it!
 
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Caribpro

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For Texas, the bottom line is in order to get a license in the state, one of two things need to happen
1. EVERY rotation has to have a residency/fellowship attached. Pediatrics rotation must be under a peds residency. Cardiology elective must be under a cardiology fellowship, etc.
2. If #1 didn't happen, then you have to get board certified first.

Do you have a source? I was under the impression in Texas you only needed to have done core clerkships with residency/fellowship in that specialty? Electives did not have to be...
 
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galactus

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Do you have a source? I was under the impression in Texas you only needed to have done core clerkships with residency/fellowship in that specialty? Electives did not have to be...

Well to be technical a good majority of your electives have to have a residency/fellowship, but all core rotations MUST have a residency tied to it.
My source? The Texas Medical Board. See Form J of the TMB Application
http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/dl/DC73ED6A-43FB-C54C-7E29-F16CC7239FA4
Note how on the form is specifically asks for the ACGME number for each core rotation required by the Texas Medical Board

Texas Law Requires of at least 130 weeks of medical education.
Example (Ross University)
Semesters 1-4 is around 60 weeks
Third year at Ross is around 48 weeks
Not sure how long that 5th semester of foundations of IM (6 weeks? but that counts since it's under the med school..i think)
That is around 116 weeks, and leaves 14 weeks of electives that must have an ACGME (residency/fellowship) number. Most electives are 2-4 weeks in length, so it's still a fair amount.

Hope that helps!
 

Caribpro

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Well to be technical a good majority of your electives have to have a residency/fellowship, but all core rotations MUST have a residency tied to it.
My source? The Texas Medical Board. See Form J of the TMB Application
http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/dl/DC73ED6A-43FB-C54C-7E29-F16CC7239FA4
Note how on the form is specifically asks for the ACGME number for each core rotation required by the Texas Medical Board

Texas Law Requires of at least 130 weeks of medical education.
Example (Ross University)
Semesters 1-4 is around 60 weeks
Third year at Ross is around 48 weeks
Not sure how long that 5th semester of foundations of IM (6 weeks? but that counts since it's under the med school..i think)
That is around 116 weeks, and leaves 14 weeks of electives that must have an ACGME (residency/fellowship) number. Most electives are 2-4 weeks in length, so it's still a fair amount.

Hope that helps!

Thanks! I looked on texas website, but never found that specific info. I have heard for Texas all cores and sometimes heard people say cores + "15 weeks" of electives must be "green book" and now I see why.
 
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Major procrastinator

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For Texas, the bottom line is in order to get a license in the state, one of two things need to happen
1. EVERY rotation has to have a residency/fellowship attached. Pediatrics rotation must be under a peds residency. Cardiology elective must be under a cardiology fellowship, etc.
2. If #1 didn't happen, then you have to get board certified first.

You can do residency in Texas, but when it comes to licensing after training, one of the 2 options above have to be met. The issue with #2 is that in order to be board certified, one must finish residency and pass the boards. One of the requirements of being board certified is that you need a state license! If you can't get one in Texas, you'll have to get a state license somewhere else (like NM or OK), then apply to Texas. The OTHER issue is that depending on your specialty, passing the boards can take up to a YEAR after residency training to be board certified. Some specialties only offer the board exam ONCE a year, others have written and oral boards that you have to pass, so if a person who didn't have all their rotations done at an ACGME accredited residency/fellowship, matched into a program in Texas, they may have to leave the great state of Texas to practice for an entire year before coming back.

Hope that clarifies it!

What if we match to a program in Texas but dont care to live there after residency? can I get my PIT, finish 3 years of residency and then go to NY get my license and take boards?

Does obtaining a full license have anything to do with finishing residency? or just matters if you want to live and practice in Texas once your done?
 
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galactus

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What if we match to a program in Texas but dont care to live there after residency? can I get my PIT, finish 3 years of residency and then go to NY get my license and take boards?

Does obtaining a full license have anything to do with finishing residency? or just matters if you want to live and practice in Texas once your done?

You can do residency in Texas with your physician in training license, and if you want to leave Texas after training, then you are free to do so. No need to get your Texas license.
A full license is only for practicing in Texas, not training.
If you want to moonlight during residency, you do need a full license in order to do that.

Hope this helps.
 

Major procrastinator

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You can do residency in Texas with your physician in training license, and if you want to leave Texas after training, then you are free to do so. No need to get your Texas license.
A full license is only for practicing in Texas, not training.
If you want to moonlight during residency, you do need a full license in order to do that.

Hope this helps.
Awesome thank you so much.

Do you know if programs make you get a full license during your PGY-3 as an IMG?
 
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