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Advantages of becoming a DPM

Discussion in 'Podiatry Students' started by msa786, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. msa786

    5+ Year Member

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    So what are the perks to becoming a DPM as opposed to say MD or DO?
    Don't we have to study just as much for podiatry school and the boards as they do in MD school and USMLE?

    SO besides the intensive curriculum, what benefits do we have in the long run???
     
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  3. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member
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    If you apply yourself in your training and have at least a little bit of interpersonal skill and business sense, then podiatry is just about the best medical specialty there is. Seriously. By this point, between 3yrs of working in a hospital in undergrad and now 3+ years of pod school, I've had a chance to rotate through or see almost every other specialty and how happy/interesting most of the docs seem. It sounds like an ad or something, but I am honestly very glad I'm going to be a DPM in another year. Based on what I want out of a medical career, the only other specialties that come close might be anesthesia (no surgery, monotonous, emergence of CRNAs and newer AAs may hurt the earnings for MDs in the field), ortho (harder hours, longer residency, less patient contact/relationships, tough to match), and optho (basically impossible to match, surgeries are all micro and/or computer guided).

    I suppose it depends on your personality and what you want to do in medicine, but in general, podiatry is great IMO. It's a mix of clinic and surgery, a highly procedural specialty that can help people almost right away, a specialty where docs can do private practice or just be a hired gun depending on what they want, and fairly good hours (compared with most other surgical specialties).

    Probably most important, foot care is a service people definitely need and will pay for even if the financial structure of the country's health care system goes awry sometime during our practicing careers (as is expected... fairly soon). Just take a look at the foot care aisle at any drugstore. People cannot function normally with painful feet, and most pod procedures and surgeries are fairly affordable even if patients have to pay some/all out of pocket.
     
    #2 Feli, Jun 6, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2008
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  4. spo01

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    :thumbup:
     
  5. msa786

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    The number one advantage I hear from podiatrists is the hours and flexibilityh this field has to offer. How true is that?
     
  6. Feli, awesome observation and feedback, thanks!
     
  7. PMSIII

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    If you've been practicing for more than 3-4 years after residency then sure, but with the way the residencies are shifting and the more surgical our training has become, our hours have extended significantly especially during the first few years post-residency. The whole 40 hour/week myth is not practical and you don't see that in medicine unless you've been in practice for some time and are choosing to cut down on your hours.

    Many factors are involved with the economy of medicine - malpractice is a big one as well as reumbursments for surgery. Surgical procedures don't pay as well as they used to be a decade ago, so now there's a push for volume and better management. However, the beauty of our profession and specialty is that as Feli had already mentioned, we are a procedural medical specialty. Patients come into the office and they leave home pain-free. This is done with debridement, bracing, injections, in-grown nails etc. That pays very well but it takes time to build up a practice like that. Even if you work for a group practice, your contract should involve an incentive where you get a certain percentage of the amount patients you bring into the practice, so right away that pushes you to extend your hours and work really hard to generate income to the practice. This is just the reality of practicing medicine today, and its ok because in return you're getting a very rewarding specialty with professional and financial security.

    Some people will choose to have 80 hour weeks if they decide to get into foot and ankle trauma and take call. This never used to be the "standard" for podiatry but is not uncommon nowadays to see a DPM handling foot and ankle trauma and building a strictly surgical practice.

    The bottom line is that long hours and hardwork are expected regardless if your intentions are extensive hindfoot/ankle surgery vs forefoot and elective procedure surgeries.
     
  8. tea_tu

    tea_tu Tea
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    Another nice advantage to being a DPM is that the field is rapidly evolving and there's always room for the profession to grow. If you like to make and see change, this is the place to be.
     
  9. rom3o

    rom3o New Member
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    Can a podiatrist choose to further his/her training and perform knee replacements, e.g., and tackle the entire LE as a whole? And if not now, is this where the future of the profession is heading, or will it always strictly be f&a?
     
  10. spo01

    spo01 Member
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    No. It will (as it should be) be strictly F&A. However, there is some DPM-DO program in FL but I don't know much about it and see no point in such a thing.
     
    #9 spo01, Jun 10, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2008
  11. PMSIII

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    The DPM-DO program will not train you in knees either. You're training still entails Foot and Ankle surgery (and believe me that's plenty enough as it is). The only way this can be possible is if you match an orthopaedic residency after your DO degree.
     
  12. PMSIII

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    Don't foresee this happening at all. Foot and Ankle physicans and surgeons is what Podiatric surgery is all about. Knee replacements are strictly an orthopaedic specialty.

    The future of this profession is to establish ourselves as specialists of the foot and ankle with excellent surgical training and medical management for those conditions.
     
  13. the-doc!

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    ^^ I like it.. and I JUST dont get it that why do questions like these come up so much... I mean JUSt for an example do cardiologist also ask other cardiologists that "hey will we ever get a chance to do a neurosurgery or foot and ankle truma"?? I mean as a DPM you become a specialist of a part of the body, why do some people make it look like so "different" ... cardiology is circulation (heart), neurology( nerve connections) (brain), Oby/gyn (woman reproductive care)...JUST like that podiatry is foot and ankle care..
     
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  14. MikeSimouns

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    The Podiatric medicine is rapidly becoming a common practice due to the high demand for foot treatment specialists. This is mainly due to the rising number of people who are suffering from various foot ailments. For instance a lot of old people and athletes are in need of podiatrists to cater for their feet problems.
     

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