PELE#10

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Just wanted to know if there is a difference. Would it be harder to be a hospitalist as an FM?
 

Narcan1

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I thought most Hospitalists were IM trained. Are there many jobs as a FP trained Hospitalist. I am would like to work in Florida, or somewhere in the South.
 
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maxpower75

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Majority of Hospitilist are IM trained, according to the society of hospitalist medicine here is the breakdown

IM 75%
Peds: 11%
IM with speciality: 4%
FP 3%
Non physician: 3%

Hospitilist medicine is a rather new career opening up, many residents completing IM residency feel more prepared with hospitalist medicine than with doing outpatient work due to the time spent in the inpatient setting.

Good Luck
 

signomi

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There are hospitalist fellowships that can be done after the 3 year IM residency. They are not mandatory, but word on the streets is they may be a few years down the road. They are generally a one year program.
 

Blue Dog

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Narcan1 said:
I thought most Hospitalists were IM trained. Are there many jobs as a FP trained Hospitalist.
You don't need a fellowship for hospital privileges. 81.7% of family physicians have hospital privileges (ref: http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/...y/facts/31.html ), and 64.2% actively manage patients in the hospital (ref: http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/...y/facts/33.html ).

I have privileges at two hospitals, but choose not to admit. Our hospitalist group is composed almost entirely of family physicians.

The only reason to do a fellowship would be if you felt that you needed the additional training.

That being said, if you know with certainty that you want to work exclusively in the hospital, my advice would be to do internal medicine.
 

Benzo4every1

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bstone said:
Is there a hospitalist specific residency?
At my old hospital, they were going to set up a hospitalist track within the IM program...
But anyone can be a hospitalist..(IM, FM,ER, etc)
 

Sundarban1

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signomi said:
There are hospitalist fellowships that can be done after the 3 year IM residency. They are not mandatory, but word on the streets is they may be a few years down the road. They are generally a one year program.
Is there anything out there in print to support this? Just curious.
 

Mumpu

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I suspect FP hospitalists do not make as much as IM hospitalists. I also don't know how good they would be -- at our program psychiatric residents do more inpatient medicine months than FPs.
 

Blue Dog

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Mumpu said:
I suspect FP hospitalists do not make as much as IM hospitalists. I also don't know how good they would be -- at our program psychiatric residents do more inpatient medicine months than FPs.
Hospital incomes are earned by billing CPT codes. It has nothing to do with whether you're boarded in FM or IM.

Psychiatry residents are required to do four months in IM, FM, or peds. The ACGME doesn't even specify that these have to be inpatient rotations (Ref: http://www.acgme.org/acWebsite/downloads/RRC_progReq/400pr1104.pdf ). Most psychiatry residents do as little inpatient medicine as possible.

The ACGME requirements for family medicine include a minimum of 8 months of adult medicine, six of which must be inpatient (Ref: http://www.acgme.org/acWebsite/downloads/RRC_prRev/120pr03_05.pdf ). Most family medicine residencies exceed these requirements.
 

Sundarban1

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I noticed that there are significantly more hospitalists positions that seek certification in IM or IM/Peds than FP. It also looked as thought the IM positions had more flexable schedules (7 on 7 off, no call, etc) than the FP positions as well.
 

Sundarban1

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bstone said:
Any idea why that is? I would think that since FP is more roboust it would be more valued as a hospitalist position.
I was under the assumption theat IM physicans have more in depth training in systematic diseases and would be more relevant to hospital.
 

Miami_med

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What is the point of a hospitalist fellowship? Isn't that the actual original point of IM?
 

Mumpu

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FP training lacks the depth required to manage complex hospitalized patients. It takes 3 years to make an internist and 3 years to make a pediatrician but it only takes 3 years to make an FP who is supposedly proficient in both. FP is a great outpatient specialty but for inpatient care I want people board-certified in my age group.

IM is not inpatient medicine. With the few exceptions (residency, hospitalists, intensivists) IM is largely an outpatient specialty. The purpose of IM is to provide depth lacking in FP.
 

RuralMedicine

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Mumpu said:
FP training lacks the depth required to manage complex hospitalized patients. It takes 3 years to make an internist and 3 years to make a pediatrician but it only takes 3 years to make an FP who is supposedly proficient in both. FP is a great outpatient specialty but for inpatient care I want people board-certified in my age group.

IM is not inpatient medicine. With the few exceptions (residency, hospitalists, intensivists) IM is largely an outpatient specialty. The purpose of IM is to provide depth lacking in FP.
You're leaving out OB and surgery they fall under the FP rubric as well. Actually your sentiments were part of the reason I opted for IM-Peds. I realize you could say that also affords less training time devoted to each individual discipline but I think that the two fields complement each other and there is enough overlap that it works well. The IM-Peds program I trained at had very strong categorical IM and Peds programs as well and IM-Peds residents were indistinguishable (or often perceived as stronger than) from their categorical counterparts according to attendings and fellows in my program.
 

Mumpu

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Agreed. If I absolutely had to have one physician for my entire family, it would be a Med-Peds person, not an FP.
 
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