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APA vs. non-APA post-docs for licensure in different states?

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M66

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I will be seeking licensure as a psychologist in Texas, but I am expecting I could move anywhere in the country in the future (partner is in academia). To become licensed in different states (after having less than 5 years licensed in Texas), should I exclusively look at APA-accredited post-doc positions?

What would you recommend for an early career psychologist who hopes to be eligible for licensure in a number of different states?


Thanks in advance!
 

AcronymAllergy

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APA-accreditation at the postdoc level isn't required for licensure in any states (at least of which I'm aware). Formal postdocs as a whole can make the licensing process much easier, but aren't required. You essentially just want to make sure you accumulate enough face-to-face clinical experience with an adequate number of supervision hours by a qualified individual (which sometimes includes a person licensed in the state of interest).
 

M66

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APA-accreditation at the postdoc level isn't required for licensure in any states (at least of which I'm aware). Formal postdocs as a whole can make the licensing process much easier, but aren't required. You essentially just want to make sure you accumulate enough face-to-face clinical experience with an adequate number of supervision hours by a qualified individual (which sometimes includes a person licensed in the state of interest).

Thank you for this information! I can't help but notice that the California Board states "You may function as an intern in a formal post-doctoral training program to Section 2911 of the Code which is accredited by the APA, or is a member of APPIC or CAPIC. Board registration is not required. All other requirements of Section 1387 of the CCR must be met in order for your hours to count toward the licensure requirements." So does this mean I at least need an APPIC post-doc? Or will general supervised experience after my PhD be adequate?
 

M66

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APA accreditation is not necessary at the postdoc level. Second what was said above about formal postdocs making the process easier, but many "formal" postdocs are not APA accredited. My excellent one at an AMC was not.

Thank you. Can you tell me in what state you are licensed, or in how many states you think this would be applicable?
 

AcronymAllergy

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Thank you for this information! I can't help but notice that the California Board states "You may function as an intern in a formal post-doctoral training program to Section 2911 of the Code which is accredited by the APA, or is a member of APPIC or CAPIC. Board registration is not required. All other requirements of Section 1387 of the CCR must be met in order for your hours to count toward the licensure requirements." So does this mean I at least need an APPIC post-doc? Or will general supervised experience after my PhD be adequate?

Hmm, based on that excerpt, my initial reaction is that those requirements seem more consistent with internship rather than postdoc. Maybe they're talking about a slightly odd situation in which a site with an existing postdoc takes on an intern instead, in which case that would be acceptable if the postdoc is APA accredited or an APPIC/CAPIC member...?

Edit: Looking at the actual statutes, it seems that may just relate to whether or not a person has to register with the CA board prior to accruing supervised experience.
 

foreverbull

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Thank you for this information! I can't help but notice that the California Board states "You may function as an intern in a formal post-doctoral training program to Section 2911 of the Code which is accredited by the APA, or is a member of APPIC or CAPIC. Board registration is not required. All other requirements of Section 1387 of the CCR must be met in order for your hours to count toward the licensure requirements." So does this mean I at least need an APPIC post-doc? Or will general supervised experience after my PhD be adequate?

I did an informal, non-accredited postdoc in CA and became licensed in CA. CA absolutely does not require accredited postdocs, so I'm not sure what this refers to, unless it's saying that state board of psych registration isn't required for APA/Appic/capic accredited postdocs? You just need supervised experience to accrue postdoc hours, in short.
 

foreverbull

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Thank you. Can you tell me in what state you are licensed, or in how many states you think this would be applicable?

Should be all states. CA is one of the stricter states for licensure in in the country and doesn't require accredited postdocs. There aren't enough accredited positions out there to force every doctoral psychology graduate to get them; I'd imagine that would cause a huge licensing crisis/uproar.
 

AcronymAllergy

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I did an informal, non-accredited postdoc in CA and became licensed in CA. CA absolutely does not require accredited postdocs, so I'm not sure what this refers to, unless it's saying that state board of psych registration isn't required for APA/Appic/capic accredited postdocs? You just need supervised experience to accrue postdoc hours, in short.

That's what my read of it was--that if it falls into one of those categories, you don't need to register with the board in advance of receiving supervision.
 
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Knowing that APA accreditation isn't needed at postdoc level, are there specific benefits to choosing APA accredited postdoc versus non-APA accredited? Appreciate any insights people have!
 

AcronymAllergy

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Knowing that APA accreditation isn't needed at postdoc level, are there specific benefits to choosing APA accredited postdoc versus non-APA accredited? Appreciate any insights people have!

Depends on the area to an extent. In neuropsych, for example, it (and/or APPCN membership) allows you to check a box and skip a bunch of steps during the credentials review process for boarding. Might lend an air of formality for other, similar processes (e.g., license applications).
 

psych7259

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APA-accreditation at the postdoc level isn't required for licensure in any states (at least of which I'm aware). Formal postdocs as a whole can make the licensing process much easier, but aren't required. You essentially just want to make sure you accumulate enough face-to-face clinical experience with an adequate number of supervision hours by a qualified individual (which sometimes includes a person licensed in the state of interest).

So, consider me fairly ignorant but I'm wondering what people mean when they say "formal?" Do you mean APA or APPIC-accredited? Or do you mean formal positions advertised as postdocs in academic medical centers, hospital systems, etc? Or just positions where there are clinical/research/education components? I guess when I hear about things like informal postdocs I think of either a position someone set up themselves or supervised experience that results in little actual training and acting more like the equivalent of a staff member.

This is also something I'm considering as I'm looking at postdocs for next year and have found a few specialty types advertised in hospital systems --but are not APA/APPIC accredited. Would these be considered formal?
 
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AcronymAllergy

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So, consider me fairly ignorant but I'm wondering what people mean when they say "formal?" Do you mean APA or APPIC-accredited? Or do you mean formal positions advertised as postdocs in academic medical centers, hospital systems, etc? Or just positions where there are clinical/research/education components? I guess when I hear about things like informal postdocs I think of either a position someone set up themselves or supervised experience that results in little actual training and acting more like the equivalent of a staff member.

This is also something I'm considering as I'm looking at postdocs for next year and have found a few specialty types advertised in hospital systems --but are not APA/APPIC accredited. Would these be considered formal?

I consider a formal postdoc to be one that's established ahead of time (e.g., rather than impromptu, as you've said), has didactic components, has a training faculty, is funded, and has formalized procedures (e.g., for completion requirements, grievances, etc.). Accreditation, in my mind, isn't currently necessary for something to be considered "formal," but it provides a good indication if one is. I wouldn't say that a postdoc in a hospital system is guaranteed to be formal, but it's more likely to be due to the institutional support and requirements.
 
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DSMX

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I consider a formal postdoc to be one that's established ahead of time (e.g., rather than impromptu, as you've said), has didactic components, has a training faculty, is funded, and has formalized procedures (e.g., for completion requirements, grievances, etc.). Accreditation, in my mind, isn't currently necessary for something to be considered "formal," but it provides a good indication if one is. I wouldn't say that a postdoc in a hospital system is guaranteed to be formal, but it's more likely to be due to the institutional support and requirements.

Exactly. And even if you're unsure if a postdoc is offering these elements when you are considering one, simply ask about them. Also, try to find people who are already postdocs at that institution to see if these elements are offered.
 
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