Class schedule and reasons for podiatry

Discussion in 'Pre-Podiatry Students' started by CareBear9984, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. CareBear9984

    2+ Year Member

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    For those of you current Scholl students, I was wondering what the typical schedule is like for 1st year pods. I'm speaking in terms of start times, end times, and number of classes for the day - just a rough estimate. Also, was it harder for you former college "semester" people to get acquainted with the "quarter" schedule. Just trying to get a feel for what I will be in for come this fall :)

    Secondly, this question goes out to all pod and pre-pod students. I know there are other threads that talk about why people decide to go into podiatry. After making a big decision between pod and DO school and many confusing times, I finally feel that I've made the right decision - for many reasons. My question to all of you, though, is this: have you ever had other people (family, friends, acquaintances from the past, random strangers, etc.) annoyingly ask you "Why would you ever want to go into THAT field?" or "How did you ever come across something like THAT?" The reason I ask is that since day one of chosing this field, I've gotten nothing but negative feedback from people who obviously have no idea what they're talking about. Not from my parents, though - they're super proud. I'm really happy with and proud of my decision - and I know I shouldn't really let what others say affect that - but after hearing this countless times, it does get annoying after awhile (ie. how many of you have had to clarify that you WILL in fact be a doctor and that podiatry school is just as hard as and as long as an MD or DO med school?) Basically, if you have, what have you said to these ignorant people?

    Finally, I apologize if there is a thread for a topic like one of these somewhere else. I'm a compulsive SDN checker, but it's definitely possible that I could have missed it! :oops:
     
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  3. jonwill

    jonwill Podiatrist
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    As you illuded to, most of these questions and comments come from ignorance. They think of podiatrists as docs who sit in a small office all day and cut toenails and trim calluses. When you explain what it is that you'll actually be doing, people are usually pretty impressed.
     
  4. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest
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    I like to tell them it could be OB-GYN or proctology.
     
  5. jonwill

    jonwill Podiatrist
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    You are listing my broken dreams :laugh:
     
  6. Podman

    Podman Senior Member
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    Not everyone understands or knows what we do as professionals and clinicians so it is not uncommon to get the inquiries or responses that you mentioned above. To be honest with you, from my personal experience, I find that the people I see at the hospital and the ones who deal with patients like I do are most respecful. Even those who don't know about our training, do genuinely like to know how I got into this specialty and what my training entails. So consequently, I give them a very sound explanation. However, from time to time, you'd get people (mostly not even in in the healthcare field) who say display rude ignorance, so I always respond with a joke and in fact, reversebly make them look like morons; and then respond with a more well-thought explanation if needed.

    The point here, is that there's no need to get worked up everytime someone displays negativity or ignorance. I have a good sense of humor, so 'stereotypes' don't bother me at all. In fact, so often I joke around with my best friend who is a Pharmacist - and he'll tell me you know you're not really a doctor, and i'll respond - yeah neither are you. lol. You are in a field heavily contingent upon confidence, so you have to be confident in every situation possible. I have nothing to 'hide' or be ashamed of. I am a future foot and ankle specialist, and I will be dealing with alot of pathology and help improve the quality of life of my patients. Ultimately it is about your cause and purpose. Respect is earned with your work, and never given - regardless of your degree, or specialty. You are heavily judged by what you can do for your patients in the industry.
     
  7. CareBear9984

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    Thanks guys, this helps a lot. I especially liked your insights podman.
     
  8. doclm

    doclm Senior Member
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    The classes are usually from 8am-noon, then until 2-6 possibly once or twice a week due to labs (anatomy lab:1-4:30ish, histology lab:1-2:30ish, physiology lab:1-2:30ish) or Interprofessional Teams that are 4-6 on Wed. However, the interprofessional teams doesn't last that long in the year.
    Usually your classes will have two hour blocks twice a day, however that is variable per week.
    http://www.rosalindfranklin.edu/scpm/year1schedule.pdf
    Here is the link to bring you to the 2006-2007 schedule.

    In podiatric medical school your classes will phase out, while a new class phases in.

    Also, I would like to add that these people who think that your chosen profession is weird, are unaware of the education and specialization that DPM's acheive. When you start getting into your later part of the first year, you realize how much more training you are getting in the foot and ankle than any other MD/DO. You will take Clinical Anatomy with the MD students, and in the end will realize that they don't cover much LE Anatomy. Especially the F&A. Once, you see how extremely complex the foot and ankle is, you should be much more content in your decision.

    Good Luck:thumbup:
     

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