Conditions preventing you from being a veterinarian? (and another Q)

Oct 7, 2010
16
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I was loading DHPP vaccines when someone told me my hands were shaking which made it a bit hard for me to inject the needle into the container with medicine. I wasn't nervous or cold which made me wonder if I had some condition. Though most likely this is nothing remotely significant, it made me curious to if there are conditions that would prevent one from becoming a vet (much like how colorblind people cannot become pilots).

In a more generalized tangent also, as a per-vet with a fairly new ambition in the field, I'm really thinking over whether I could make it as a vet. I was a true cynic with the belief that history repeats destiny and that people don't change. I always had mediocre grades (3.3-3.5) and my parents never finished college. After changing career goals though, I am really putting up an effort to pursue my newfound passion (shooting for straight A's & getting as much vet exp as possible).

I like to think of myself as observant in that I noticed that there are 2 types of pre-vet students: people who want to be vets (majority of people) and those who were meant to be vets (the minority that get in to vet schools). I'm convinced I am in the prior category which scares me. I'm not here for support but I would like to know from experienced people if what I said is true in the veterinary field (and if so, have you met someone who still made it as a veterinarian)
 
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BlacKAT33

UPenn c/o 2014!! :)
Jul 1, 2009
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Veterinary Student
sorry for my half ass response, i'm really sick and sleepy but i thought i'd get this thread going since no one has responded to you

I was loading DHPP vaccines when someone told me my hands were shaking which made it a bit hard for me to inject the needle into the container with medicine. I wasn't nervous or cold which made me wonder if I had some condition. It was probably nerves! Even if you don't think your nervous, sometimes your body has a different opinion lol
Though most likely this is nothing remotely significant, it made me curious to if there are conditions that would prevent one from becoming a vet (much like how colorblind people cannot become pilots). I'm trying to think of something...can't really think of anything. I mean, besides something extreme like no arms. But these days who knows, maybe you could make it through with no arms! I mean, the worst thing I can think of that is close to colorblindness for pilots is animal allergies for vets. But of course, this has been discussed in a ton of threads and you can totally be a vet with pet allergies!

In a more generalized tangent also, as a per-vet with a fairly new ambition in the field, I'm really thinking over whether I could make it as a vet. I was a true cynic with the belief that history repeats destiny and that people don't change. I always had mediocre grades (3.3-3.5) These are good grades! and my parents never finished college. They are different people than you! Them not finishing college means nothing when it comes to you. After changing career goals though, I am really putting up an effort to pursue my newfound passion This is great! (shooting for straight A's & getting as much vet exp as possible).

I like to think of myself as observant in that I noticed that there are 2 types of pre-vet students: people who want to be vets (majority of people) and those who were meant to be vets (the minority that get in to vet schools). What about those who want to be a vet and who were meant to me a vet? I'm convinced I am in the prior category which scares me. I'm not here for support but I would like to know from experienced people if what I said is true in the veterinary field (and if so, have you met someone who still made it as a veterinarian) I've seen all kinds of people! There are some vets where i wonder why the heck did he want to become a vet and how did he get accepted?! There are others who dream of becoming a vet and get in and become great vets! I also have a very good friend who I know will be the BEST vet, but was never given a chance to prove himself in an interview. After many tries, he decided to apply to St. Georges and he is there now. Straight As. He is going to be AMAZING when he graduates. Heck, the vets at our clinic came to HIM for clinical advice on reptile!!! he is basically a reptile expert already lol
Well, i hope this gives you hope! yes, i know i just said hope 2 times in one sentence haha blahh bed time! :)
 

Willowhand

KSU Class of 2014
10+ Year Member
Mar 24, 2009
391
1
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Veterinary Student
There are probably some conditions or traits which are incompatible with veterinary medicine, but there are definitely vets out there who have used talent, creativity, and effort to overcome obstacles which some would have thought insurmountable. Case in point: http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov09/091115e.asp

Nothing you mentioned struck me as putting you at a terrible disadvantage. Plenty of people (and I'm one of them) have been accepted with GPAs in the range you listed, provided they show strengths in other important areas and somehow demonstrate the ability to succeed academically. In working to improve your grades and get plenty of experience in the field, it sounds like you're doing just the right thing.

On another note, you may want to get the tremors checked out by a doctor -just to make sure there's nothing medical going on there.
 

LoveMyDobies

OSU CVM c/o 2015
Oct 7, 2010
108
0
Cincinnati, Ohio
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I work with a doctor who has an actual condition that causes her hands to shake (pretty wildly sometimes) and she does just fine.. I guess she has found ways to cope with it.
 

PendantWorld

Cornell CVM c/o 2015
Dec 1, 2010
111
0
New York
Status
Veterinary Student
I don't know how frequently you draw up vaccines, but if it is something you don't do often, it could just be that you need to exercise your fine motor control skills a bit more. I started research in a bioengineering lab where I needed to frequently pipette small amounts of solution into various sized test tubes. I had always thought that I had great motor skills, but I noticed that my hands would shake. After working in the lab for a couple months, the shaking disappeared.

Also, consider threading a needle. I know tons of people that can do it easily - but they've been sewing for awhile. Most people who aren't used to it find that their hands shake while they are trying to get the thread through the eye. This may be a similar outcome to what you experienced.
 

sumstorm

10+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2008
3,331
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Veterinarian
Yes, there are conditions that could prevent you from practicing vet med. We had to sign a form stating that we did not have any conditions that would prevent us from fulfilling the obligations within the profession as part of admissions, but when I inquired, they were talking really big things like quadrapalegic, blind...things that would actually prevent you from doing some basic component of vet med (observations.) If, at some point, instructors felt you were unable to complete tasks adequatly to be a practicing vet, you could request a practical examination (where you and other students at your skill level + a clinician would be required to perform the same task. If you can manage, no worries.

So, I don't think shaking hands are going to do it, and if any of the other things that could do it are going to impact your life, you will need to have some time to figure it out.

As for whether or not your parents graduated college, mine didn't graduate high school. While it does impact your knowledge base and backgrounding, it only impacts your path if you allow it to. The quick solution is to find some mentors who have done what you need to do.

I will say, you need to feel some level of confidence about yourself on a day to day basis. It is fine to have moments or even days where you have serious doubts (and I think that is healthy), but this is a tough profession for those who question their competencies on a daily basis.

My suggestion; get more experience and find some mentors to help guide you.
 
OP
T
Oct 7, 2010
16
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Oh man, you guys should see the banana grin on my face after reading through the responses!

Thanks for the feedback, it honestly was reassuring for me to hear some genuinely experienced responses. I plan on applying in a couple more years though so hopefully I have time to redeem myself :D
 

StartingoverVet

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Feb 17, 2010
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Neither here nor there.
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(much like how colorblind people cannot become pilots).

I like to think of myself as observant in that I noticed that there are 2 types of pre-vet students: people who want to be vets (majority of people) and those who were meant to be vets (the minority that get in to vet schools). I'm convinced I am in the prior category which scares me. I'm not here for support but I would like to know from experienced people if what I said is true in the veterinary field (and if so, have you met someone who still made it as a veterinarian)
1) Colorblind people CAN become pilots. Well actually color deficient people, I don't think anyone is really completely color blind unless they are, well, blind. Unless you have severe color deficiency, you only have to demonstrate that you can perform properly for flying at night (completely unrestricted during the day). Personally, I have severe color deficiency, but still have a commercial license but could not fly a 747 at night. Bummer.
Anyway, even color "blind" pilots can fulfill their dreams!

2) Totally disagree with this statement as well. I don't think I was "meant" to be a vet. I wanted to be one, I did what was necessary and now I am here. You can do the same. Just have to be patient and keep at it.

There is very little you can't overcome if you keep at it.

Which is what I am telling myself about this anatomy exam. But that is a story for another thread.
 
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OP
T
Oct 7, 2010
16
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Hopefully i can curb this clumsiness too by the time I apply to vet school. (I'm hoping it's just inexperience that's causing me to mess up a lot)
 

lunajett

KSU Class of 2014
Dec 14, 2009
182
1
Manhattan, KS
Status
Veterinary Student
Just want to echo that 3.3-3.5 are NOT bad grades. They won't get you at the top of the list, but they will certainly get you in the ballpark. I got in with about a 3.3 overall, IIRC. 'Course, there are a lot of other factors (mainly GRE, experience, reccomendations) so def work on building those, but a 3.3-3.5 GPA should not be a big problem for most schools.
 

breenie

Weenie 2015
Apr 5, 2010
1,519
4
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Veterinary Student
1) Colorblind people CAN become pilots. Well actually color deficient people, I don't think anyone is really completely color blind unless they are, well, blind. Unless you have severe color deficiency, you only have to demonstrate that you can perform properly for flying at night (completely unrestricted during the day). Personally, I have severe color deficiency, but still have a commercial license but could not fly a 747 at night. Bummer.
Anyway, even color "blind" pilots can fulfill their dreams!
But what about Dwayne in Little Miss Sunshine who wanted to be a pilot but was colorblind!?!? Could he have fulfilled his dreams all along!?
 

david594

The-OSU CVM c/o 2013
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Aug 20, 2007
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But what about Dwayne in Little Miss Sunshine who wanted to be a pilot but was colorblind!?!? Could he have fulfilled his dreams all along!?
He wanted to be a fighter pilot. Big difference.
 
Oct 17, 2010
17
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
My hands shake from nerves whenever people are staring at me but I still manage to get the needle where it needs to go. My parents are not college grads. I worked for a relief vet for a week who was allergic to cats yet did a fine job for any cat that came in the clinic that week. I knew I wanted to be a vet but never believed I could even pass college algebra until I totally slayed that course and physics, and OChem, and anything else that stands in my way.

Just remember, in the chemical equation that is life, you are your own limiting reagent!