Decent undergrad GPA bad Grad GPA?

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dscmn

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I have 3.6 GPA 3.67sGPA for undergrad. My grad GPA is 3.2.
My Undergraduate GPA is already low enough that I am worried whether my grad GPA will hurt my chances even furthur.
I have seen people asking what people saying they have good grades gpa but bad undergrad GPA but haven't heard about the opposite case.
My "excuse" would be I was "forced" to pursue a graduate degree in a field I did not want due to immigration issues I had back then.
What is your thought on this?

Thanks

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I have 3.6 GPA 3.67sGPA for undergrad. My grad GPA is 3.2.
My Undergraduate GPA is already low enough that I am worried whether my grad GPA will hurt my chances even furthur.
I have seen people asking what people saying they have good grades gpa but bad undergrad GPA but haven't heard about the opposite case.
My "excuse" would be I was "forced" to pursue a graduate degree in a field I did not want due to immigration issues I had back then.
What is your thought on this?

Thanks
A lot will ride on your MCAT score.

As far as you saying that you were forced to do a degree that you had no interest in and thats the cause of the low gGPA, I think that will be looked at negatively because it is an excuse. It can be looked at as poor judgement because while you have no interest in the field of your grad degree, you knew that performing poorly could cause a bump in your path to being a doctor and that wasn't enough motivation to cause you to do well. HOWEVER, I think you could take responsibility and say that it was a rough time for you due to dealing with immigration status or whatever the case was and that caused your grades to fall during your grad studies.

Good luck!
 
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A lot will ride on your MCAT score.

As far as you saying that you were forced to do a degree that you had no interest in and thats the cause of the low gGPA, I think that will be looked at negatively because it is an excuse. It can be looked at as poor judgement because while you have no interest in the field of your grad degree, you knew that performing poorly could cause a bump in your path to being a doctor and that wasn't enough motivation to cause you to do well. HOWEVER, I think you could take responsibility and say that it was a rough time for you due to dealing with immigration status or whatever the case was and that caused your grades to fall during your grad studies.

Good luck!
Agree 100%
 
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Welcome to the forums.

Exactly what graduate program were you forced to enroll in? I understand wanting to stay on a student visa, and perhaps there are situations in your home country that meant you wanted to stay as a student. But we don't have enough information to gauge any "damage."
 
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Welcome to the forums.

Exactly what graduate program were you forced to enroll in? I understand wanting to stay on a student visa, and perhaps there are situations in your home country that meant you wanted to stay as a student. But we don't have enough information to gauge any "damage."
Hey thanks for the reply
Bio engineering
It turned out that math was not my thing and I could have changed my major to bio but needed to major in a major that would help me get a greencard back then.
My GPA was heavily affected by classes I took with other engineering majors. Since my grad school classes were all engineering, I was doing very poorly.
For classes that were predominantly none engineers, I pretty much have straight A's, so I making this "excuse" argument.
 
A lot will ride on your MCAT score.

As far as you saying that you were forced to do a degree that you had no interest in and thats the cause of the low gGPA, I think that will be looked at negatively because it is an excuse. It can be looked at as poor judgement because while you have no interest in the field of your grad degree, you knew that performing poorly could cause a bump in your path to being a doctor and that wasn't enough motivation to cause you to do well. HOWEVER, I think you could take responsibility and say that it was a rough time for you due to dealing with immigration status or whatever the case was and that caused your grades to fall during your grad studies.

Good luck!
Hey thanks for your reply
I see most DO school's average GPA is 3.6 and MCAY is 506. What kind of MCAT score should I be getting?
 
Hey thanks for the reply
Bio engineering
It turned out that math was not my thing and I could have changed my major to bio but needed to major in a major that would help me get a greencard back then.
My GPA was heavily affected by classes I took with other engineering majors. Since my grad school classes were all engineering, I was doing very poorly.
For classes that were predominantly none engineers, I pretty much have straight A's, so I making this "excuse" argument.
How long were you in the bioengineering masters program? What have you done since?
 
It might raise some eyebrows.

Sometimes, one has to appl with the app one has, warts and all.
So for DO schools, I am fine but for MD schools I am not basically?
 
So for DO schools, I am fine but for MD schools I am not basically?
No one can be 100% sure of anything. I understand the neuroticism, but you may just have to apply and see how it shakes out. Unless youre willing to do another graduate degree on the "hopes" that you'll be able to get an MD spot. As Goro has said. DO you should be fine with a decent MCAT. MD schools may question your app due to the downward trend from under grad to grad GPA.
 
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I have 3.6 GPA 3.67sGPA for undergrad. My grad GPA is 3.2.
My Undergraduate GPA is already low enough that I am worried whether my grad GPA will hurt my chances even furthur.
I have seen people asking what people saying they have good grades gpa but bad undergrad GPA but haven't heard about the opposite case.
My "excuse" would be I was "forced" to pursue a graduate degree in a field I did not want due to immigration issues I had back then.
What is your thought on this?

Thanks
Bad take. Trying to say you were forced to get a degree due to immigration is not a good look. What will happen if you don't like your neurology block? You'll fail it?
 
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Bad take. Trying to say you were forced to get a degree due to immigration is not a good look. What will happen if you don't like your neurology block? You'll fail it?
I knew the engineering wasn't my thing on second grade. I didn't fail it, I just did bad (class average) on it compared to my other classes. I wanted to switch my major but couldn't and ended up "forcing" myself doing engineering all the way to graduate school in order to get a sponsorship.

I know it is just an excuse but I somewhat feel like I have a valid claim but it seems like folks in the medical field are not gonna like it. I did ask this question to my primary care doctor at a side who happened to work briefly at admissions. She told me my excuse is a valid point to make though, especially when engineering is "harder" than most majors.
 
I knew the engineering wasn't my thing on second grade. I didn't fail it, I just did bad (class average) on it compared to my other classes. I wanted to switch my major but couldn't and ended up "forcing" myself doing engineering all the way to graduate school in order to get a sponsorship.

I know it is just an excuse but I somewhat feel like I have a valid claim but it seems like folks in the medical field are not gonna like it. I did ask this question to my primary care doctor at a side who happened to work briefly at admissions. She told me my excuse is a valid point to make though, especially when engineering is "harder" than most majors.
You do understand that from the point of view of many doctors is that you'll encounter many things in medicine you don't like, and what that type of statement projects is that you won't put effort into those things?

I don't have a dog in this fight. I'm just trying to help you understand how others may perceive it
 
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I knew the engineering wasn't my thing on second grade. I didn't fail it, I just did bad (class average) on it compared to my other classes. I wanted to switch my major but couldn't and ended up "forcing" myself doing engineering all the way to graduate school in order to get a sponsorship.

I know it is just an excuse but I somewhat feel like I have a valid claim but it seems like folks in the medical field are not gonna like it. I did ask this question to my primary care doctor at a side who happened to work briefly at admissions told me it is a valid point to make though, especially when engineering is "harder" than most majors.

You do understand that from the point of view of many doctors is that you'll encounter many things in medicine you don't like, and what that type of statement projects is that you won't put effort into those things?

I don't have a dog in this fight. I'm just trying to help you understand how others may perceive it
I appreciate it thank you
I am still confused how I am supposed to remedy for this issue...
 
I appreciate it thank you
I am still confused how I am supposed to remedy for this issue...
I get the "why" of why you did it (in order to stay in the US, I assume) but med schools won't see it that way.

Save yourself the trouble and apply DO.
 
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I get the "why" of why you did it (in order to stay in the US, I assume) but med schools won't see it that way.

Save yourself the trouble and apply DO.
I was gonna
Even without my grad GPA, I don't see myself competitive for MD.
Glad to hear DO schools don't care too much
 
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