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Dental Residency for Foreign Graduates of American Dental Schools

Discussion in 'Dental Residents and Practicing Dentists' started by ckim88, Mar 24, 2007.

  1. ckim88

    ckim88 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 6, 2007
    Hi all,

    I have questions about residency opportunities for foreign graduates (no American citizenship or permanent residency) of American dental schools.

    Anyone know if residency programs discriminate against foreign graduates of American dental schools due to visa problems? I am interested in pedodontics and orthodontics, and many training programs say that they consider foreign graduates of American dental schools, but isn't it more difficult to get in if you are a foreigner?

    What type of visa is granted for dental residency programs? Physician residency programs usually state that they grant either the J1 or the H1 visa. Dental residency programs almost never mention visa in their websites. What is the visa for dental residency programs?

    I considered posting this in the international dentist forum, but most people there are foreign dental school graduates contemplating moving to the U.S. Please enlighten me about applying to a dental residency program as a foreign graduate of an American dental school. Personal experiences, anyone?

    Thank you,
     
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  3. MrVagus

    MrVagus licensed to fill 5+ Year Member

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    Oct 4, 2006
    Boston
    Its tough but its still possible to gain acceptance into a residency program if you are an international student who graduated from a US-Dental school. You are correct, many programs dont post much information about persons in that situation. Moreover the published requirements arent universal, but there's probably a number of reasons for this. Some just require that you be able to obtain a dental license. One of the reasons I was given was that many programs just dont want to go through the hassle of filing/waiting for the necessary paperwork to get an H1 or J1 visa especially when, in a post-911 environment, the visa approval isn't gauranteed. If the visa isnt approved then they're stuck trying to fill an open position, and in same cases that can be as late as the day before the official program start date. I believe that residencies based at private institutions are a little more forgiving towards international students than state or federally funded ones. But then again alot of those private ones have hefty tuitions and for some strange reason there seems to be a widespread rumor that all international students are loaded with cash. However one suggestion that I was given was to call/email the director of the programs that you maybe interested in and respectfully ask him/her point blank what their policy is regarding international student graduates of US dental schools. I'm not sure if this helps. However best of luck. I know what your going through.

    MrVagus
     
  4. ckim88

    ckim88 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 6, 2007
    Mr. Vagus, I sincerely thank you for your reply. So H-1 and J-1 are the visas that are given to dental residents?
    H1 and J1 are vastly different. One can file for permanent residency under H1 but not under J1. I am more interested in H1 than J1...... what determines which visa is given? Is this something I should contact individual dental schools for? May I ask how was it in your case?

    Does anyone know how long it would take to get permanent residency if I got a job with H1 after dental school? I know it can vary, but is there some kind of a minimum length of time must a person be a H1 holder before he/she can apply for permanent residency? I ask this because I am also contemplating getting permanent residency first and then going into residency.

    Thank you,

    kim
     
  5. Balki

    Balki The Perfect Stranger 7+ Year Member

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    Aug 23, 2003
    NYC
  6. WireBender2010

    WireBender2010 2+ Year Member

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    Dec 12, 2006
    Just from personal experience....I am going to a school that gives an F1 for Dental Residencies. Two others that I know of and doing dental residencies (Perio at UIC and Harvard) are also on F1.
    WireBender2010.
     
  7. ckim88

    ckim88 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 6, 2007
    Dear all,

    Thanks for your inputs.

    F1 was actually the type of visa I was expecting for dental residency..... which is unfortunate because F1 is a nonimmigrant visa that places strict restrictions on employment.
     
  8. WireBender2010

    WireBender2010 2+ Year Member

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    Dec 12, 2006
    You are still allowed to work on-campus for up to 20 hours per week on a F1 visa.
     
  9. MrVagus

    MrVagus licensed to fill 5+ Year Member

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    Oct 4, 2006
    Boston

    Apparently J1 visa's are easier to obtain than H1 visas. Also they (J1) usually require that you return to your home country for a certain period of time before being able to switch to another visa category at the completion of your studies. F1 visas are educational visas, which might be obtainable for Perio, Ortho or endo programs which usually are not salaried/employment positions. You can work on campus with the F1, but as a resident that places moonlighting out of the question. Unless its "under the table". At best those programs might require/ask you to teach pre-doctoral classes and give you a small stipend.
    However OMFS, GPRs, Pedo, and other hospital based programs are considered to be entirely separate educational/employment entities. For these J1 or HI visas are required. With regards to US immigration guidelines, H1 visas offer greater flexibility during and after your training. If all else fails, you can always marry a local :scared: . Not that I've done, or considered doing that, but trust me you wouldnt be the first.....
     
  10. ckim88

    ckim88 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 6, 2007
    I know MD residents on J1 have to return to their home countries for at least two years but I didn't know that requirement applied to dental residents as well...... I think that makes F1 better than J1.

    I guess I would be better off going after hospital based programs that are salaried.
     
  11. Jaybe

    Jaybe Lazy Tongs 7+ Year Member

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    Nov 30, 2006
    Please, don't try this unless you are HOT! The last thing this country needs is more ugly foreigners running around!
    ;)
     
  12. TempleDMD

    TempleDMD Banned Banned

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    I heard a rumor that they haven't filled a lot a spots in orthodontics and pedodontics at the University of Iraq. I would try there. They love foreigners especially Americans. I am sure any state in the U.S. will accept your credentials after finishing their program if you live to see graduation. Good luck.
     
  13. MrVagus

    MrVagus licensed to fill 5+ Year Member

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    Boston
    Ok Salma Hayek is not ugly... Moreover I was originally infering that maybe he could take a few of your "not so Hot" locals off your hands...:D He'd be doing your country a great service....

    And if you are suggesting that being a dentist isnt enough HOTness to overcome any amount of ugly:eek: then in that case you've just crushed the spirits of my many "local" colleagues across the US ....:scared:... especially the wannabe periodontal plastic surgeons
     
  14. BlueToothHunter

    BlueToothHunter 10+ Year Member

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    Dec 7, 2004
    My thoughts... as I am also an F-1 student...in a hospital-based ortho program.

    Even the salaried hospital based GPR programs won't give you an H-1B (it costs too much for them and there is no National Interest Waiver for a GPR dental resident in the country at the moment). They will most likely give you a J-1 or F-1. If I were you, I would stick with F-1 and at the end of your program, apply for OPT and then seek an employment. OPT can be used for valid employment for 12 months from the end of your training. So during that time romance the dentists or dental chains (e.g. Western dental) and they will arrange your H-1B.
     
  15. fugi9

    fugi9 5+ Year Member

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    Mar 8, 2007
    Hey just wondering...are there any states/ schools which allow foreign trained dentists to apply for dental residency in the US? What are the success rates for foreign trained dentists getting into a residency program/ specialization?

    And is it more difficult for a Canadian citizen (but did not graduate from a Canadian DentalSchool) to get a working visa for the US?
     
  16. setdoc7

    setdoc7 Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    We have two foreign residents, one US trained (GPR) and one canadian trained (pedo). We are a public institution. Did not seem like much of a problem. Med Staff office took care of the visas.
     
  17. MrVagus

    MrVagus licensed to fill 5+ Year Member

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    Oct 4, 2006
    Boston
    Setdoc7 where you at... PM me if you prefer. thanks
     
  18. ckim88

    ckim88 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 6, 2007
    I guess as long as I can get a spot in a residency program, it shouldn't be that much of a problem...... I heard that there are plenty of dental chains willing to sponsor H1B visas.
     
  19. toofache32

    toofache32 10+ Year Member

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    Apr 18, 2003
    Why on earth do we have ortho programs in hospitals?!?
     
  20. prechilill

    prechilill Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Jun 29, 2004
    To share the pain with the OMS dentists getting pounded on by the ENT residents:laugh:
     
  21. toofache32

    toofache32 10+ Year Member

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    Apr 18, 2003
    Huh? You'll have to explain what you're talking about.
     
  22. gryffindor

    gryffindor Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    Why not? I like that I am in a hospital. It provides a different perspective in our training and I'm pretty sure we are exposed to a lot more surgical and craniofacial patients than some of our dental school counterparts.
     
  23. TKD

    TKD Member 5+ Year Member

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    Sep 23, 2005
    Don't mean to hijack, but don't come within 100 feet of dental chains. They are a tumor to the dental community. Non-dental chain practices can hire and sponsor as well and you'd be happier and less morally compromised.
     
  24. Poderosa

    Poderosa poderosa

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    haha you are so right! I'm gorgeous and a dentist what else does this country needs, I'm a swimmer as well. I am divine!! :thumbup::laugh::p:p:p
     
  25. setdoc7

    setdoc7 Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    I am the GPR director at Jacobi Med Ctr, Bronx, NY. Has never been a problem accepting foreign residents who have been trained in US or Canadian dental schools. Our medical staff office takes care of the visa requirements, usually J1. We are also a recognized dentist shortage area in New York, so graduates of our program can get a New York State license if need be.

    On another note, I am still looking for 2 OMFS interns (previous GRP required) and one GPR Chief Resident (PGY2) for the 2009 class. The Chief resident may be eligible for a certificate in advanced training in implantology.
     
  26. akg

    akg Member 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 18, 2006
    why don't i find Jacobi dental GPR program listed on ADA website? is it listed under any other name?
     
  27. xiaoxiao

    xiaoxiao Dr. Crazy 10+ Year Member

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    Sep 16, 2004
    I wonder if international students could get stipend if they got accepted to OMFS? thanks
     

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