bambam92

Membership Revoked
Removed
Nov 26, 2012
454
190
Library Basement
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi guys, I am a pre-med student at URI. I initially wanted to be a physician coming into undergrad, but now I am looking into dental. I shadowed a dentist over the break to see what it was all about, and I actually found it quite interesting. Now I am only a sophomore so I have some time, and as far as stats hopefully I will be able to be competitive for either school-my cumulative GPA currently sits at a 3.83. Many physicians have told me that if you could see yourself being a dentist undoubtedly do dental! I found this interesting. I have heard obamacare will hit the physicians and not affect dentists. Is this true? Both financial success and job satisfaction is important to me. Clearly the hours seem to favor dentistry. Please give me some insight as to what you feel are the big pros and cons to both careers. Thanks a lot guys!!

Blake
 

dentalWorks

Nights Watchmen
7+ Year Member
Jun 25, 2009
5,646
158
Sterling Hts, Mi
Status
Dentist
Hi guys, I am a pre-med student at URI. I initially wanted to be a physician coming into undergrad, but now I am looking into dental. I shadowed a dentist over the break to see what it was all about, and I actually found it quite interesting. Now I am only a sophomore so I have some time, and as far as stats hopefully I will be able to be competitive for either school-my cumulative GPA currently sits at a 3.83. Many physicians have told me that if you could see yourself being a dentist undoubtedly do dental! I found this interesting. I have heard obamacare will hit the physicians and not affect dentists. Is this true? Both financial success and job satisfaction is important to me. Clearly the hours seem to favor dentistry. Please give me some insight as to what you feel are the big pros and cons to both careers. Thanks a lot guys!!

Blake
what your physician fail'd to mention is today, a good portion of USA dental schools are private, meaning your dental degree will cost you about 400-450k (and yes, there is that 6.8 - 7.9% interest)... Still wanna be a dentist? read on....

As far as being competitive goes, yes 3.8 GPA is competitive. Basically, take the DAT and apply, assuming a 19+ DAT performance, you'll get in somewhere.
 
Nov 5, 2011
86
1
Status
Dental Student
Doctors have to do an extra four years of residency. I'll be done with dental school by 24. Easy choice.
 

UltimateHombre

Doc Holliday D.D.S.
7+ Year Member
May 10, 2010
1,144
115
Status
Dental Student
I once heard it said...

Firefighters tell you to be a paramedic, paramedics tell you to be a nurse, nurses tell you to be a physician, physicians tell you to be dentist, dentists tell you to start working on your swing early ;)
 

DMDWANNABEE

7+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2011
141
20
Status
Dental Student, Dentist
Doctor:
Well lets see... I'd say you'll have more respect, more $, job security, a way larger scope of practice, and you'll get to tell that cute girl (or guy) at the coffee shop that you're a "real" doctor.

Dentist:
Better hours, some say less stress, typically less chance of killing someone, procedural work without the lengthy surgical residency - just four years baby (+ possible AEGD/GPR). Did I mention better hours?

I'm just giving my take on a few of the differences between dentists and general practitioners though. Medicine is so large and varied compared to dentistry that I always feel kind of silly comparing the two.

When I made my choice it was mostly based on my view that the practice of medicine is a life consuming adventure, while dentistry is less so. By that I mean the training is shorter, mistakes are less dire, and the job itself demands less time. If I were a different person, and wanted my life to be career-centered I would have picked medicine with little hesitation. I went with what I think will be a more balanced lifestyle.

Hope that helped in some way.
 

wo5678

5+ Year Member
Dec 30, 2011
464
7
Status
Pre-Dental
I like my sleep and working with my hands, so i choose dentistry.
 

Seahawk

Nothing to do here
5+ Year Member
Jul 21, 2010
786
16
Status
Dentist
Doctor:
Well lets see... I'd say you'll have more respect, more $, job security, a way larger scope of practice, and you'll get to tell that cute girl (or guy) at the coffee shop that you're a "real" doctor.

Dentist:
Better hours, some say less stress, typically less chance of killing someone, procedural work without the lengthy surgical residency - just four years baby (+ possible AEGD/GPR). Did I mention better hours?
lol +1




OP, you will be good financially either way. Choose which one you like more, since being happy with what you do is the most important thing.
 

UCSFx2017

10+ Year Member
Oct 11, 2007
1,128
115
Status
Resident [Any Field]
If you have the qualities of Sherlock Holmes, stick with Medicine. "For, working as he did rather for the love of his art than for the acquirement of wealth, he refused to associate himself with any investigation which did not tend towards the unusual, and even the fantastic."

If you enjoy doing things outside of work more than you do career-related things, pursue dentistry, I guess. If you love both dentistry and having a life outside of work, dentistry is a safer bet.

I would emphasize the most unique aspect of dentistry that separates it from any medical specialty. Dentists take care of patient's oral health and craft functional and aesthetically appealing smiles that improve patients' self esteem by using a myriad of hand tools as well as a team of assistants. We cut both hard and soft tissue. Dentistry is the most personable of all the medical professions. We are face-to-face with our patient's faces all day long. We build relationships with our patients who are conditioned to visit us for at least twice a year. Usually an entire family shares one dentist. We get to know an entire family. You have to be gregarious to thrive in Dentistry. Unlike in some specialties in Medicine which do not require from you as much patient contact, in Dentistry, great communication skills are a must.
Choose Dentistry for quick results and tangible gratification. Choose Medicine for long-term results and generally less clear but more challenging answers which can be more rewarding than Dentistry. This just depends on your preference. Dentistry is more technically challenging than it is intellectually challenging than Medicine. This is true of most surgical specialties.
Dentistry is less likely to be affected by politics so you have a relatively stable and less dynamic field than Medicine. If you want the latest in technology, the intellectual challenge, and responsibilities of a Physician, then you should pursue medicine. You sacrifice more but for some people, that sacrifice adds more significance to their lives. As a dentist you should be happy with developing trusting relationships with your community and working with your hands and actually seeing clear results (beautiful smiles) by the end of the day.
There are many elective procedures in Dentistry giving it both a healthy amount of income that is unaffected by insurance and lots of room for business freedom.
In Dentistry you are the master of your own universe but that also means that within the office chain of command, you are at the top so any problem or complaint your patients have must ultimately be resolved by you. You are not tied to any continuous obligations to a hospital and you generally have more freedom in terms of work hours than compared to most medical specialties. But that is not to say that dentists do not answer to emergency calls because they actually do. Some even save lives by preventing dental abscesses from infecting the rest of your body, which is lethal.
If family is important to you, by choosing Dentistry you are automatically in a life style specialty. In medicine, you'd have to be at the near top of your class with high Step 1 scores to get into any of the few lifestyle specialties in Medicine (ROAD).

What are the stereotypes of a classic dentist?
"Dentists have a sense of duty to help others and do it with genuine kindness. They like working with their hands and fixing problems. They are precise, thoughtful, and do not mind hard work."
http://vcusod2014.wix.com/sod2014#!__about-us
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=13118084#post13118084
 

suarez 7

5+ Year Member
Jan 31, 2012
257
19
Status
Dentist
If you want to be a physician, under Obamacare physicians will actually see an increase of 25% in their salaries. It's the specialists that take the cut.