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May 21, 2018
5
2
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Hi,

I am looking for open advice pertaining to my current scribe job. To give some background, I recently graduated from my university pre-PA. I had a work study job while I was there and didn't have much time to scribe. I decided to scribe to get some shadowing and health care hours for PA school. I know PA schools prefer patient care hours(CNA, patient care technician, etc.). I believe scribing to be the best option without certification, just because I don't have like a couple of hundred dollars to spend on getting my CNA certification right now.

Anyways, I started scribing immediately when I graduated in May. I scribe at two hospitals right now and I have been having the worst experience. Hear me out, I know adjusting to post-grad life can be hard but this job honestly sucks. One hospital I work at, the providers are great and I have even made friends with a few of my coworkers. The other hospital--not a good time. The providers are pretty rude and will talk to the scribes in a very condescending way and get frustrated when scribes ask questions. Also my coworkers at this location are not very friendly. They are very passive aggressive and flat. There are a few providers at this location that are friendly and nice but I definitely feel like the nurses, providers, and mid-levels are generally rude/unhappy. The other hospital I work at the nurses, providers, and mid-levels are all more pleasant. I asked my company if I could be just at that hospital and they basically said no. The hospital I don't like is also 30 miles away from where I live

Also, my experience with this scribe company has been very unpleasant. They are forcing me to work at three hospitals when I asked to just be at one. I work a full-time schedule and my availability is completely open and I constantly pick and trade shifts with other people. I also had problems with my trainer at this site talking to me very disrespectful and in a sexist manner. Telling me that he didn't think I would be a good scribe based on my looks. I also have an NP who witnessed this event. My company also gave me no choice in the days for my orientation which wasn't too big of a deal. I also only asked for one week off in the summer for a music festival that I spent a lot of money on(they guaranteed that I would be off before I started). They ended up scheduling me during that one week that I have off and I told my boss that I already spent too much money and that I would have to quit since I only make $7.25 an hour. Also that asked if I could pick up a shift one week and I agreed and when I got to work they had disabled my account and I spent over 2 hours at work trying to figure out what was wrong with my account. They ended up only saying I was at work for 1.5 hours which was annoying considering it costs me 12 dollars in gas just to drive out to this hospital. They also constantly schedule me on night shift from 9pm-6am and then 4pm-2am all in the same 24 frame, leaving me with little time in between shifts.

thanks to one of my bosses. I am slowly being taken off the schedule at the hospital I don't like. I just don't know what to do because I hate this company so much. Also, I make 7.25 per hour for providers to talk to me like I'm an idiot. I just feel like I put up with so much and get paid so little. Im just caught in the middle because I would have quit a long time ago if it I didn't need the healthcare exposure. I hate that I am being so negative about this but I dread going to work and I'm having to get another job in order to make ends meet even though I have a college degree with a good GPA. I'm just looking for some advice like should I quit/suck it up?

All is appreciated
 

GoSpursGo

Allons-y!
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Moving to pre-medical forum. The suggestions and feedback forum is for site feedback.
 

Phiona

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Jan 20, 2016
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So, when I read the first couple paragraphs, I was thinking that while it's unfortunate some of the providers and staff are unpleasant, it's often part of the job and maybe just something you'd have to deal with. You can encounter that in any job, though it is obviously more pleasant to work with nice people. Things like having no choice of your orientation days I personally don't think is a big deal. Then I got to the part where they only paid you for 1.5 hours when you worked a whole shift. Depending on what state you're in, I'm pretty sure that's straight-up illegal and warrants escalation. I would have zero tolerance for that kind of crap. Having been a "chief scribe" myself, I wouldn't blame you for quitting for getting scheduled at locations you weren't expecting or during a vacation and I definitely wouldn't blame you for leaving due to lousy pay and questionable conduct from your trainers/supervisors.
 
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Catalystik

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Sep 4, 2006
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1) I make 7.25 per hour for providers to talk to me like I'm an idiot. I just feel like I put up with so much and get paid so little.
2) Im just caught in the middle because I would have quit a long time ago if it I didn't need the healthcare exposure.
3) I hate that I am being so negative about this but I dread going to work and I'm having to get another job in order to make ends meet even though I have a college degree with a good GPA.
4) I'm just looking for some advice like should I quit/suck it up?
1) Not worth it.

2) Look for another job, maybe in a private office where you can use the same skills, or where you don't need certification to get patient contact.

3) Get any other job until you find one that is right for you and gives you the needed patient care experience to qualify you for PA school.

4) Quit, but give appropriate notice. Be professional.
 

Robin-jay

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Sep 23, 2017
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I've written about scribing before, so I'm not going to post a lengthy response. But after a few months of scribing, call it quits and get a different job.

You earned putting it on your application, time to move on (I know you have 0 scribing experience, but scribing for about 6 months is a nice number).

Your job now is to get accepted to medical school, not to work for a company and in environments that hold you back.

Don't get me wrong, I loved what I learned as a scribe, but its not something you want to dip a million hours in.
 

Catalystik

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Your job now is to get accepted to medical school . . .
OP is planning to go to a PA school, not med school. A year of paid patient-care experience is a common prerequisite, from what I've seen.
 
May 21, 2018
5
2
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
So, when I read the first couple paragraphs, I was thinking that while it's unfortunate some of the providers and staff are unpleasant, it's often part of the job and maybe just something you'd have to deal with. You can encounter that in any job, though it is obviously more pleasant to work with nice people. Things like having no choice of your orientation days I personally don't think is a big deal. Then I got to the part where they only paid you for 1.5 hours when you worked a whole shift. Depending on what state you're in, I'm pretty sure that's straight-up illegal and warrants escalation. I would have zero tolerance for that kind of crap. Having been a "chief scribe" myself, I wouldn't blame you for quitting for getting scheduled at locations you weren't expecting or during a vacation and I definitely wouldn't blame you for leaving due to lousy pay and questionable conduct from your trainers/supervisors.

Hi thank you! Im sorry I should have clarified... So that day my account never ended up working because my own company had accidentally disabled me from the whole EHR system and i was there for a very long time before the provider finally just told me to go home since it's illegal to chart if my initials weren't recorded at every entry(HPI, ROS, EXAM, and MDM). I personally emailed my company and asked if I would still get paid for those hours even though I couldn't technically work. I received no response and ended up asking one of my bosses and they were able to show me online that I was only paid for 1.5 hours even though I drove over 30 miles to work, spent over 2 hours there and drove thirty miles back. It wasn't that big of a deal because my boss was able to fix it, but it sucks because he's constantly having to fix the companies/hospitals wrongdoings.

BUt yes the pay is very lousy and goes up to 8.50/hour if I work for 2 more months. Then if I work 1000 hours it will go up to 10/hour. But I work 8-10 hour shifts so that means I will have to work at least 100 shifts before I qualify for 10/hour. So with if I work 4 shifts a week then that would take a little over 6 months to earn 10/hour.
 
May 21, 2018
5
2
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I've written about scribing before, so I'm not going to post a lengthy response. But after a few months of scribing, call it quits and get a different job.

You earned putting it on your application, time to move on (I know you have 0 scribing experience, but scribing for about 6 months is a nice number).

Your job now is to get accepted to medical school, not to work for a company and in environments that hold you back.

Don't get me wrong, I loved what I learned as a scribe, but its not something you want to dip a million hours in.

Cool, thank you!
 
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May 21, 2018
5
2
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
1) Not worth it.

2) Look for another job, maybe in a private office where you can use the same skills, or where you don't need certification to get patient contact.

3) Get any other job until you find one that is right for you and gives you the needed patient care experience to qualify you for PA school.

4) Quit, but give appropriate notice. Be professional.

thank you! yeah, I've been contemplating quitting and at least move to a better scribe company that is more professional overall. You're right to say that I should give appropriate notice because I would never want to leave the providers without a scribe. Helpful feedback, thanks!
 
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Robin-jay

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Sep 23, 2017
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OP is planning to go to a PA school, not med school. A year of paid patient-care experience is a common prerequisite, from what I've seen.
Ah you're right. Sorry about that OP, but you got my point. Don't let insignificant things hinder the bigger more important things!
 
Jun 28, 2018
12
6
I’ve been a scribe for almost 2 years. I’m absolutely over it. I hate it. I loved the patient exposure and learned a lot which has given me a better insight into what it’s like to work in healthcare and it looks great on a resume. That being said, I would agree that it’s time to call it quits and do something with your degree if you already have “some” clinical scribe experience. I’m at the point that I’m lousy at being a scribe because I’m just so miserable with the job itself (basically a secretary). I hate the condescending providers (I can handle it, but at some point you’re just like enough). I have met great people both patients and providers but my problem is that I hate the job itself. How clerical it is. At some locations I’ve had the chance to triage, which I’ve loved, but others just have you sit and hand you paper after paper. I’m also applying to med school and definitely doing else for work whether I get in this cycle or not. I can’t stand scribing anymore.
 
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gyngyn

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Nov 4, 2011
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I’ve been a scribe for almost 2 years. I’m absolutely over it. I hate it. I loved the patient exposure and learned a lot which has given me a better insight into what it’s like to work in healthcare and it looks great on a resume. That being said, I would agree that it’s time to call it quits and do something with your degree if you already have “some” clinical scribe experience. I’m at the point that I’m lousy at being a scribe because I’m just so miserable with the job itself (basically a secretary). I hate the condescending providers (I can handle it, but at some point you’re just like enough). I have met great people both patients and providers but my problem is that I hate the job itself. How clerical it is. At some locations I’ve had the chance to triage, which I’ve loved, but others just have you sit and hand you paper after paper. I’m also applying to med school and definitely doing else for work whether I get in this cycle or not. I can’t stand scribing anymore.
It is not the resume booster it may have once been.
 
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getdown

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Nov 16, 2010
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Just a few general advice not specifically for OP:

1. You're at the bottom of the totem pole and in a stressful job like medicine **** rolls down the hill. If you can't handle the harsh attitude you're in for a rude awakening in the wards as a medical student and even worse as a resident. You'll often be blamed or yelled at for things completely out of your control and you can't quit either. So learn now how to handle these situations.

2. What do you expect as a scribe? Your job definition is entirely clerical in nature. You have NO medical training or experience and thus should not be able to provide any medical opinion. You can obviously learn and pattern recognize certain conditions but doing any independent diagnosis without proper supervision is inappropriate. Keep in mind as a med student and resident you're poorly compensated relative to the time you spend at the hospital working.

3. If you're in a position that you hate, and you have the option to quit then you should. There are many other things you can do to gain clinical experience outside of scribing.

4. For many people their first job will be entry level where you do a lot of scut and are given the worst schedules. No one should expect an entry level job to be somehow fulfilling. But what you should gain from these jobs is responsibility, taking pride in your work, being punctual and professional, how to handle difficult coworkers and/or clients. All necessary soft skills to be successful in the wards as a medical student, resident and attending. If the first time you have to learn these skills is in the wards you're going to be in for a rough couple of years as you navigate the hierarchy, hospital politics and nursing personalities. Learn it sooner rather than later.
 

Planes2Doc

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It is not the resume booster it may have once been.
Very true. I would quit with proper notice (don't burn bridges). Instead, spend the time doing clinical volunteering. You won't get paid, but you are ultimately "paying" for convenience. You can't beat killing multiple birds with one stone with a once weekly commitment. You can spend the time you save by studying for classes and the MCAT, both of which are more important than an entry-level clinical job.
 
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Select All That Apply

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Feb 27, 2018
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@ashbash96 This is better suited for physician assistant forums seeing as how you didn't reply to @Catalystik that you were no longer planning on going the PA route. The reason why it's better is because there are a number of schools that distinguish between PCE/HCE hours or patient care experience/healthcare experience. The last time that I checked, scribing was considered HCE (not PCE) by many institutions and certain schools have their own specific hour requirements which are outlined on an Excel spreadsheet somewhere on PA forums.

If you graduated literally last month (May) as a traditional student, then I would suggest that you use your free time to consult career services that is affiliated with your school to give you job recommendations. To speak blatantly, finding anything outside of scribing/CNA work is hard as many people are filling positions that new college grads used to fill as a second career or a transition career. However, losing interest in a job after working in it for less than a month is possibly indicative of Peter Pan syndrome assuming that this is your first grown up job following four years of schooling. Please note that now is the best time to transition out of this job as there will be little to no time in between and you do not have to list this experience on your resume when it comes to future interviews/employment opportunities.

Outside of career aspirations, Planes2doc wrote a really good thread about placing priorities targeted towards students applying to medical school. However, it can also apply to someone looking at PA school if you are familiar with the criteria needed for getting into the schools that you are going to be applying to in the future.
 
Last edited:
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May 27, 2019
9
13
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Hi,

I am looking for open advice pertaining to my current scribe job. To give some background, I recently graduated from my university pre-PA. I had a work study job while I was there and didn't have much time to scribe. I decided to scribe to get some shadowing and health care hours for PA school. I know PA schools prefer patient care hours(CNA, patient care technician, etc.). I believe scribing to be the best option without certification, just because I don't have like a couple of hundred dollars to spend on getting my CNA certification right now.

Anyways, I started scribing immediately when I graduated in May. I scribe at two hospitals right now and I have been having the worst experience. Hear me out, I know adjusting to post-grad life can be hard but this job honestly sucks. One hospital I work at, the providers are great and I have even made friends with a few of my coworkers. The other hospital--not a good time. The providers are pretty rude and will talk to the scribes in a very condescending way and get frustrated when scribes ask questions. Also my coworkers at this location are not very friendly. They are very passive aggressive and flat. There are a few providers at this location that are friendly and nice but I definitely feel like the nurses, providers, and mid-levels are generally rude/unhappy. The other hospital I work at the nurses, providers, and mid-levels are all more pleasant. I asked my company if I could be just at that hospital and they basically said no. The hospital I don't like is also 30 miles away from where I live

Also, my experience with this scribe company has been very unpleasant. They are forcing me to work at three hospitals when I asked to just be at one. I work a full-time schedule and my availability is completely open and I constantly pick and trade shifts with other people. I also had problems with my trainer at this site talking to me very disrespectful and in a sexist manner. Telling me that he didn't think I would be a good scribe based on my looks. I also have an NP who witnessed this event. My company also gave me no choice in the days for my orientation which wasn't too big of a deal. I also only asked for one week off in the summer for a music festival that I spent a lot of money on(they guaranteed that I would be off before I started). They ended up scheduling me during that one week that I have off and I told my boss that I already spent too much money and that I would have to quit since I only make $7.25 an hour. Also that asked if I could pick up a shift one week and I agreed and when I got to work they had disabled my account and I spent over 2 hours at work trying to figure out what was wrong with my account. They ended up only saying I was at work for 1.5 hours which was annoying considering it costs me 12 dollars in gas just to drive out to this hospital. They also constantly schedule me on night shift from 9pm-6am and then 4pm-2am all in the same 24 frame, leaving me with little time in between shifts.

thanks to one of my bosses. I am slowly being taken off the schedule at the hospital I don't like. I just don't know what to do because I hate this company so much. Also, I make 7.25 per hour for providers to talk to me like I'm an idiot. I just feel like I put up with so much and get paid so little. Im just caught in the middle because I would have quit a long time ago if it I didn't need the healthcare exposure. I hate that I am being so negative about this but I dread going to work and I'm having to get another job in order to make ends meet even though I have a college degree with a good GPA. I'm just looking for some advice like should I quit/suck it up?

All is appreciated
I have been working as a scribe for 3 years now, so let me give you my 2 cents.

First, there are always going to be doctors that are rude and unfriendly. You get that at most hospitals. Unfortunately, as a scribe, you are basically there assistant; so kissing their ass is a small part of the job. My best advice for dealing with these is to just avoid confrontation with them, make the charts exactly how they like them, and suffer quietly. After they see that you make good notes and make their lives easier, they will usually warm up to you.

Second, there are always going to be co-workers who are unfriendly as well. I have worked with a lot of scribes that are just like the ones you described. In my experience, it tends to be those that have topped out. By that, I mean that being a scribe is the top level of what they hope to do with their life. I tend to ignore those people knowing that ultimately their opinions mean nothing to me in the long run anyways. Ultimately, though, you are there getting paid, so as long as you are getting a check, it shouldn't be too big of a deal. Show up, get paid, and make your friends elsewhere.

Lastly, and most importantly, you are being ridiculously underpaid. For this reason, you should run from that job like the plague. If I had to guess you are working for a national scribe agency that sells their position to you as "a great experience." Don't buy that BS. If you want to scribe, find you a smaller physician staffing company and get a job with them. I was paid $12/hr while in high school in rural Alabama to scribe, so trust me, 7.25 is a rip-off. I know people that went to some of those national staffing companies and they were offered the same thing you were, so I have a bit of experience with it.

Best of luck to you.
 
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Nov 10, 2018
10
14
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I worked 5 months scribing full time. Once I felt I got enough experience I got out.
One location I enjoyed a lot, but the other 3 were farther away and sporadic enough where I couldn’t develop relationships with staff. Combined with crazy scheduling (switching between night and day shifts all the time), low pay ($8.25 after first ~250 hours and +.50 to train), and med school interviews starting I decided it was time to go. Now, until med school starts, I work a non-medical job, M-F, 8-5, $12, and best of all guaranteed lunch everyday

If you want to keep scribing I hear going direct will increase your pay significantly and getting into an office is more stable.

I don’t know how useful scribing for doctors is when you are aiming for PA school. At the good location I became friends with the PAs and NPs. But only scribed for them for a couple patients on slow nights.

Just weigh the value you put on experience vs your conditions. Whichever way the scale tips = your decision.

If you can save enough for a one week music festival then perhaps you can save for the CNA cert you said you couldn’t afford before?

Good luck
 
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