Quantcast

Dismissed from Optometry School for Academic Reasons. Need Advice.

This forum made possible through the generous support of
SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17

Members don't see this ad.
I am in a predicament: **** has dismissed me for academic reasons during my first year / first semester. I failed one lecture and one lab (only passed the other courses), appealed to the academic committee and failed the appeal. After crying and gnashing my teeth for a few days (I take responsibility for this debacle), I am left with a few options:

-Reapply to ****. The dean said that is an option I can do for this coming year, though I'll be mixed in with the new applicants. That makes me worried about my chances of getting accepted when compared to fresher, better records.

-Apply to a different school. I'm actually alone in Texas and actually hail from California. **** is possibly a school I could reapply to since it is newer than ****, but two problems with that: they accepted me before and I rejected them...and I have this suspension over my head.

-Cut my losses and do something else. I have a public relations major that I could possibly use, but I'm aware that it won't make as much as and won't be as secure as a degree in optometry. This is kind of my bitter pill option overall.

...so I'm stuck. I'm aware that I'm screwed up and I'm disappointed that I wasn't just held back like some other students. Maybe they are telling me that I can't cut it?

Some advice would be appreciated. Thank you very much.
 
Last edited:

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
To update this thread, I mentioned in my application that I'm focusing on the coursework of the failed classes and am enrolled in a course focused on teaching students to be better studiers. I'm not sure if that is enough to convince admissions, but I'm hoping it shows the schools that I won't let this happen again.
 

urheb

New Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Messages
10
Reaction score
13
I think you once said that you chose this career more for job security, money, respect, and family pressure right?
Unless you find genuine interest in the career I doubt that you will do better.
Answer this to yourself. Why do you have to be an optometrist? If it's money and job security, well.. gl on your second try.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

preopt2019

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2018
Messages
208
Reaction score
53
Sorry to hear that you were dismissed from UHCO. Was there any remedial options presented to you before they came to this conclusion??
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

spidermedic

Probationary Status
Joined
Dec 14, 2021
Messages
53
Reaction score
42
You can always do podiatry. It's nearly a guaranteed acceptance if you have >2.8 and take the MCAT (It's a formality and a 480 will get you scholarships). If you have >3.1 you can get into the more expensive dental schools (easy) and the newer DO schools
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

spidermedic

Probationary Status
Joined
Dec 14, 2021
Messages
53
Reaction score
42
Maybe. I already tried for DO before and didn't get in.

Wouldn't my dismissal from optometry school affect my application in a significant way? I failed a professional school - that will make me DOA at many institutions.
Did you apply widely and to all of the new schools? Some of the more expensive ones accept waitlisted applicants as late as 1-2 weeks before orientation as others drop for better schools. I myself and my friend applied two times with very little change in our apps and got into our current (MD) schools that rejected us the first time around. The process is very random sometimes
 

Weirdy

Full Member
Volunteer Staff
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
3,623
You can always do podiatry. It's nearly a guaranteed acceptance if you have >2.8 and take the MCAT (It's a formality and a 480 will get you scholarships). If you have >3.1 you can get into the more expensive dental schools (easy) and the newer DO schools
If OP is struggling with Optometry, getting into DPM is possible- but the courses are equally as hard. Not including board exams, clinicals, and matching into a mandatory 3 year residency. Getting in is easy. Finishing is just as hard or harder.

Consider reapplying to UHCO and other schools. My SO went through the same as you at UHCO and switched careers altogether. She is much happier now but it took a while to process her failure and come to terms with it.

You are smart and talented and hard working. This failure does not reflect on who you are and what you are capable of in the future. If you want optometry bad enough- reapply and don't take no for an answer.

If you are OK with locking your specialty into foot and ankle, come over to the podiatry threads. Just know you will be working just as hard and even harder during residency. You cannot leave and practice after getting your DPM degree like you could with an OD.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
If OP is struggling with Optometry, getting into DPM is possible- but the courses are equally as hard. Not including board exams, clinicals, and matching into a mandatory 3 year residency. Getting in is easy. Finishing is just as hard or harder.

Consider reapplying to UHCO and other schools. My SO went through the same as you at UHCO and switched careers altogether. She is much happier now but it took a while to process her failure and come to terms with it.

You are smart and talented and hard working. This failure does not reflect on who you are and what you are capable of in the future. If you want optometry bad enough- reapply and don't take no for an answer.

If you are OK with locking your specialty into foot and ankle, come over to the podiatry threads. Just know you will be working just as hard and even harder during residency. You cannot leave and practice after getting your DPM degree like you could with an OD.
I'm kind of in this though right now. I'm trying not to go into catastrophizing crisis mode - this was my first big failure regarding academics.

I'm looking at reapplying to UHCO (the assistant dean recommended that) and another school. Somebody at UHCO did that and ended up becoming an optometrist. I recall that UHCO is considered quite hard as an institution...and I found it very difficult to even pass the stuff, despite my best efforts.

I'm just looking for something as a career. I'm in my late 20s, so my clock is ticking.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Weirdy

Full Member
Volunteer Staff
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
3,623
I'm kind of in this though right now. I'm trying not to go into catastrophizing crisis mode - this was my first big failure regarding academics.

I'm looking at reapplying to UHCO (the assistant dean recommended that) and another school. Somebody at UHCO did that and ended up becoming an optometrist. I recall that UHCO is considered quite hard as an institution...and I found it very difficult to even pass the stuff, despite my best efforts.

I'm just looking for something as a career. I'm in my late 20s, so my clock is ticking.
It happens. Look far and wide and consider other schools with less competitive entry stats.

If you are genuinely curious about podiatry, come over to the thread. Just know you are locking in your specialty. If you want, consider Spidermedic's advice regarding dental and DO schools.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

spidermedic

Probationary Status
Joined
Dec 14, 2021
Messages
53
Reaction score
42
I'm kind of in this though right now. I'm trying not to go into catastrophizing crisis mode - this was my first big failure regarding academics.

I'm looking at reapplying to UHCO (the assistant dean recommended that) and another school. Somebody at UHCO did that and ended up becoming an optometrist. I recall that UHCO is considered quite hard as an institution...and I found it very difficult to even pass the stuff, despite my best efforts.

I'm just looking for something as a career. I'm in my late 20s, so my clock is ticking.
If you want more of a guaranteed option look into LECOM's MMS program. It's an SMP (Special masters program) designed for premed/predent. It used to be if you have a 497 MCAT (fairly easy to achieve) and get a 3.3 in the master's you're *automatically* admitted to the DO program. That GPA fluctuates 3.1-3.3 and I think it might be around the same or lower for dental. Other SMPs like VCOM exist but LECOM's has a better success rate
 

wysdoc

Plain-spoken Texan
Administrator
Volunteer Staff
Lifetime Donor
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2016
Messages
7,607
Reaction score
12,112
I'm kind of in this though right now. I'm trying not to go into catastrophizing crisis mode - this was my first big failure regarding academics.

I'm looking at reapplying to UHCO (the assistant dean recommended that) and another school. Somebody at UHCO did that and ended up becoming an optometrist. I recall that UHCO is considered quite hard as an institution...and I found it very difficult to even pass the stuff, despite my best efforts.

I'm just looking for something as a career. I'm in my late 20s, so my clock is ticking.
There are lots of allied health fields you could consider.
Being an ophthalmic technician in a busy practice would use some skills you already know.
Operating room technician is very medical and doesn't require professional school.
Ultrasonographer, Xray or CT scan technician, train to work in a dialysis center, others are out there. Take some time and think about what you would find fulfilling.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

SpoiledMilk

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2015
Messages
1,690
Reaction score
2,650
Since you're already in Houston..

 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Members don't see this ad :)

Teeth and Titanite

Full Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
89
Reaction score
90
You can always do podiatry. It's nearly a guaranteed acceptance if you have >2.8 and take the MCAT (It's a formality and a 480 will get you scholarships). If you have >3.1 you can get into the more expensive dental schools (easy) and the newer DO schools
You are unlikely to get interviews from dental schools with a <3.3 GPA even with a 99th percentile DAT. Speaking from experience.
 

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
If you want more of a guaranteed option look into LECOM's MMS program. It's an SMP (Special masters program) designed for premed/predent. It used to be if you have a 497 MCAT (fairly easy to achieve) and get a 3.3 in the master's you're *automatically* admitted to the DO program. That GPA fluctuates 3.1-3.3 and I think it might be around the same or lower for dental. Other SMPs like VCOM exist but LECOM's has a better success rate

Oh! That is interesting. Is the process still automatic? My MCAT is above 497...though not by much.

Seems like it is a guaranteed interview as opposed to an guaranteed acceptance. That could mean I could get rejected post-completion of the program. I think my suspension from the optometry school might snag me there - it is a professional program after all and I screwed up.
 
Last edited:

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
There are lots of allied health fields you could consider.
Being an ophthalmic technician in a busy practice would use some skills you already know.
Operating room technician is very medical and doesn't require professional school.
Ultrasonographer, Xray or CT scan technician, train to work in a dialysis center, others are out there. Take some time and think about what you would find fulfilling.

I worked as an ophthalmic technician prior to optometry school. It was alright, but I recall I was near the bottom of the totem pole.

I'm just looking for a trek to a decent career. I worked in eyes for awhile, which is why I decided to pursue optometry. The job was nice and I was familiar with how everything flowed.
 
Last edited:

Weirdy

Full Member
Volunteer Staff
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
3,623
I'm just disappointed that they kicked me to the curb without a second chance. That tells me that they have little confidence in my ability to complete expectations...which is disappointing.

I tried for med, but that was a bust. Dental and podiatry aren't really appealing to me because...well...teeth and feet.
Its Houston. They have a reputation to uphold and enough Texans who want to stay in state to be able to pick and choose as they please.

Has nothing to do with your ability or their expectations.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

OD 1993

New Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2021
Messages
9
Reaction score
9
You were dismissed in your first year first semester for failing one lecture and one lab but passed all the other courses ? Is this the protocol for all Optometry schools in 2022 ? Failure of one course gets you dismissed from school without remediating or making it up ?
What course and lab did you fail ?
Not doubting your story being credible but not sure what to make of it. Is there anything else you are not disclosing ?
I thought Optometry schools support their students and try the best they can to keep them. After all, for the private schools, that's big money being lost on one student if they dismiss. Perhaps, state schools are different.
You tried for med n failed you mentioned. etc
What was your undergrad GPA upon entering UHCO ?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

spidermedic

Probationary Status
Joined
Dec 14, 2021
Messages
53
Reaction score
42
Oh! That is interesting. Is the process still automatic? My MCAT is above 497...though not by much.

Seems like it is a guaranteed interview as opposed to an guaranteed acceptance. That could mean I could get rejected post-completion of the program. I think my suspension from the optometry school might snag me there - it is a professional program after all and I screwed up.
No SMP is "guaranteed" but LECOM is about as close as you'll get. They just can't use the word "guaranteed" because if someone gets in legal trouble they wouldn't want to take them. Many of my friends did MMS and said it's essentially automatic as long as you don't f up (you'd be surprised at how many premeds/predents can't stay out of trouble - like weed or drinking). About 50% of DOs are <500 and if you go back 5 or so years its even more. You're definitely capable of handling the curriculum. Some schools had an average equivalent to a 491 not that long ago (~9 years ago), meaning 50% were below that, and many of them are attendings now.
 
Last edited:

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
You were dismissed in your first year first semester for failing one lecture and one lab but passed all the other courses ? Is this the protocol for all Optometry schools in 2022 ? Failure of one course gets you dismissed from school without remediating or making it up ?
What course and lab did you fail ?
Not doubting your story being credible but not sure what to make of it. Is there anything else you are not disclosing ?
I thought Optometry schools support their students and try the best they can to keep them. After all, for the private schools, that's big money being lost on one student if they dismiss. Perhaps, state schools are different.
You tried for med n failed you mentioned. etc
What was your undergrad GPA upon entering UHCO ?



My undergrad GPA was in the low 3s, though it came after a long post-bacc cleanup that was much higher. My OAT was also kind of subpar-ish - I was frankly surprised to even get an interview and acceptance from UHCO, though it was probably due to my work history: tons of years of clinic and research stuff.

That is pretty much it - I did pass the other courses, though they weren't happy with merely passing (mostly Cs with a B for Neuro lab). I was hoping to be at least held back a year, but with an assured spot. However, they just concluded to throw me out. It still burns, even after two weeks out.

Maybe UHCO just has very high standards for their students? My classmates are all quite brilliant, so that wouldn't surprise me. I heard that is one of the harder optometry schools in the nation, so that could be possible - they just concluded that I'll fail the next cycle.
 
Last edited:

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
Don’t do an smp if it’s not a guaranteed acceptance in writing

Regardless of how legit these guaranteed interview programs are. Even if they historically took a lot of their grads, doesn’t mean they will in your year. I have classmates that did them and didn’t get in. Ended up in podiatry, Caribbean or quitting medicine altogether

Fair point. From reading their file, it seems like it is still a gamble. An interview means jack - it gets you closer, but that is hardly an assured acceptance.
 

urheb

New Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Messages
10
Reaction score
13
That is kind of surprising.

I did wish I got in the past though - that interview really got me high...before they dashed me in the face.

The classes I did poorly in were both optometry-specific courses too, so half of me thinks I maybe could've survived better with just flat medical / science courses. Then again, the teachers did curtail some detail here and there because we weren't going to be medical physicians.

Heck! I don't even mind doing primary care - it is a good job after all with constant employment.
Uhh... no doctors just learn 'flat' medical/science courses and see patients. Clinical skill is a must in everywhere not just in optometry.
It is harsh to say but if you couldn't pass the first semester in optometry school, I doubt you can get through in other programs like DPM, DO, or DDS. Talking to friends who went to dental school and DO school, optometry school seemed relatively easier as far as course load and academic rigor.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Weirdy

Full Member
Volunteer Staff
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
3,623
Uhh... no doctors just learn 'flat' medical/science courses and see patients. Clinical skill is a must in everywhere not just in optometry.
It is harsh to say but if you couldn't pass the first semester in optometry school, I doubt you can get through in other programs like DPM, DO, or DDS. Talking to friends who went to dental school and DO school, optometry school seemed relatively easier as far as course load and academic rigor.
Sat in on some optometry school courses.

They are just as hard in terms of neuroanatomy etc. Reading MRI scans labeling structures so on so forth.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Members don't see this ad :)

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
Uhh... no doctors just learn 'flat' medical/science courses and see patients. Clinical skill is a must in everywhere not just in optometry.
It is harsh to say but if you couldn't pass the first semester in optometry school, I doubt you can get through in other programs like DPM, DO, or DDS. Talking to friends who went to dental school and DO school, optometry school seemed relatively easier as far as course load and academic rigor.

What I meant about "flat" is that they were just the standard "memorize and churn out" sort of things familiar to many science classes: get the Power Point / textbook, study the material and then throw it on the test paper. I probably should've specified that.

Optics was more about application (the teacher was really focused on concepts, which was different - the lab was more focused on the math) and clinic...was clinic: I freaked out on the first test and made so low that I couldn't recover for the second exam.

...but yeah. I got a stern lecture from one of the higher-ranked officials about my conduct. She was disappointed that I couldn't hack the optometry courses...in optometry school, which is a reasonable criticism. I did pass the optometry concept course, which ran parallel to the clinic - I started out poorly, but did better on the next test and final.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
Sat in on some optometry school courses.

They are just as hard in terms of neuroanatomy etc. Reading MRI scans labeling structures so on so forth.

Our neuroanatomy teacher was fair. She gave us review sheets to examine before the test and they effectively highlighted her expectations for the examinations. It was still meaty, so it wasn't like her class was a throwaway experience.

Her focus was more on application...as in X and Y symptoms equal Z diagnosis. It made for a harder exam since you couldn't just memorize the info outright, but she made it relatively easy to follow with examples.

Her lab was more about labeling parts...and that was much more straightforward. She tells us which parts she wants us to know, we mark it on our charts and then spew it back onto the paper when test time comes around.
 
Last edited:

OD 1993

New Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2021
Messages
9
Reaction score
9
Optics and Clinic I.

My undergrad GPA was in the low 3s, though it came after a long post-bacc cleanup that was much higher. My OAT was also kind of subpar-ish - I was frankly surprised to even get an interview and acceptance from UHCO, though it was probably due to my work history: tons of years of clinic and research stuff.

That is pretty much it - I did pass the other courses, though they weren't happy with merely passing (mostly Cs with a B for Neuro lab). I was hoping to be at least held back a year, but with an assured spot. However, they just concluded to throw me out. It still burns, even after two weeks out.

Maybe UHCO just has very high standards for their students? My classmates are all quite brilliant, so that wouldn't surprise me. I heard that is one of the harder optometry schools in the nation, so that could be possible - they just concluded that I'll fail the next cycle.
Leftpaw, I'm truly sorry for what you are going thru. I can only imagine how down you feel and I encourage you to overcome this and come bounce back stronger. When I got out in 1993, Optometry school wasn't a walk in the park. It was hard and I recall stressful at times due to the heavy course work, labs and exams every so often. Optics, is the course that usually hurts students. When I became an OD, it was because I wanted to be an optometrist and the curriculum at the time was just that including medical knowledge. Fast forward to appx 30 years later, my understanding is the core course are still taught but the curriculum has evolved and geared towards medicine. A lot more, tons more of medicine than back in my day.
Show perseverance. Perhaps, change study habits and more discipline and re apply. Just don't apply to ICO. I hear horror stories from their students (cannot verify if they are true or not) b/c it sounds the school is malignant and in chaos in more ways than one. Suppose ably, their students are miserable. Same goes for PCO-Salus, according to reports few years back. Proceed with caution. BTW- I did not attend either of those two schools.

In closing, when I got out, there were only 16 US OD schools and competition for admission was fierce. Not easy and I got in straight from undergrad. With 22-23 OD schools now, I imagined it would be a lot easier for admission and staying the course of the program; but it's up to you the individual to succeed.
Hang in there and best wishes on your life journey.
OD 1993.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

spidermedic

Probationary Status
Joined
Dec 14, 2021
Messages
53
Reaction score
42
Uhh... no doctors just learn 'flat' medical/science courses and see patients. Clinical skill is a must in everywhere not just in optometry.
It is harsh to say but if you couldn't pass the first semester in optometry school, I doubt you can get through in other programs like DPM, DO, or DDS. Talking to friends who went to dental school and DO school, optometry school seemed relatively easier as far as course load and academic rigor.
I'm an MD student and I can tell you that it's not as simple as MD>DO>DDS>DPM/Pharm/OD etc in terms of difficulty. Curriculums have changed so much over the years and it's very school-dependent. For example, my school is VERY laid back, we're assessed on competency and not on mastery (true P/F with very few exams). I would say our curriculum is EASIER than that of many DO schools even. Still, many of us are self-motivated and do more than the bare minimum. If one wanted to do the bare minimum at my school, they'd still pass USMLE (its P/F now) and can easily match primary care (many people going into FM have lots of free time at my school).

At the same time DO might be "easier" for some since the board exam itself (COMLEX) is SLIGHTLY easier to pass and is enough for primary care. While I may not have a lot of info on other health professions many of them are also very competitive. I knew a guy in undergrad who was competitive for DO (more than me at the time) but decided to go the PT route.

Medicine requires a lot of discipline but the material is not hard. It's long hours of memorization, and you need some critical thinking skills to understand concepts (otherwise memorization will feel brutal). I failed more than I can count in undergrad and even struggled in my SMP, and I'm a thriving MD student now. OP had one setback and that shouldn't mean they give up on their dreams without giving it a second shot
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
Leftpaw, I'm truly sorry for what you are going thru. I can only imagine how down you feel and I encourage you to overcome this and come bounce back stronger. When I got out in 1993, Optometry school wasn't a walk in the park. It was hard and I recall stressful at times due to the heavy course work, labs and exams every so often. Optics, is the course that usually hurts students. When I became an OD, it was because I wanted to be an optometrist and the curriculum at the time was just that including medical knowledge. Fast forward to appx 30 years later, my understanding is the core course are still taught but the curriculum has evolved and geared towards medicine. A lot more, tons more of medicine than back in my day.
Show perseverance. Perhaps, change study habits and more discipline and re apply. Just don't apply to ICO. I hear horror stories from their students (cannot verify if they are true or not) b/c it sounds the school is malignant and in chaos in more ways than one. Suppose ably, their students are miserable. Same goes for PCO-Salus, according to reports few years back. Proceed with caution. BTW- I did not attend either of those two schools.

In closing, when I got out, there were only 16 US OD schools and competition for admission was fierce. Not easy and I got in straight from undergrad. With 22-23 OD schools now, I imagined it would be a lot easier for admission and staying the course of the program; but it's up to you the individual to succeed.
Hang in there and best wishes on your life journey.
OD 1993.

Thank you very much. I'm just wondering why they didn't give me a second chance - maybe it is because I'm from CA and not from TX.

I definitely heard about trying other schools to pass - some other students have done that after getting suspended from another school. I'm determined to try and do better. I think I can as well since I didn't fail across the board.
 

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
I'm an MD student and I can tell you that it's not as simple as MD>DO>DDS>DPM/Pharm/OD etc in terms of difficulty. Curriculums have changed so much over the years and it's very school-dependent. For example, my school is VERY laid back, we're assessed on competency and not on mastery (true P/F with very few exams). I would say our curriculum is EASIER than that of many DO schools even. Still, many of us are self-motivated and do more than the bare minimum. If one wanted to do the bare minimum at my school, they'd still pass USMLE (its P/F now) and can easily match primary care (many people going into FM have lots of free time at my school).

At the same time DO might be "easier" for some since the board exam itself (COMLEX) is SLIGHTLY easier to pass and is enough for primary care. While I may not have a lot of info on other health professions many of them are also very competitive. I knew a guy in undergrad who was competitive for DO (more than me at the time) but decided to go the PT route.

Medicine requires a lot of discipline but the material is not hard. It's long hours of memorization, and you need some critical thinking skills to understand concepts (otherwise memorization will feel brutal). I failed more than I can count in undergrad and even struggled in my SMP, and I'm a thriving MD student now. OP had one setback and that shouldn't mean they give up on their dreams without giving it a second shot

That is true. Schools teach the material in their own fashion - some are harsh and others are a bit more lax. That is why the standardized tests exist after all - they equalize all the pupils.

I have heard that UHCO is one of the harder optometry schools...and I admittedly transplanted myself to TX from CA because I fell for the name recognition. I should've read the academic manual a bit more carefully - I underestimated the "drinking from a fire hose" approach of professional school.

Considering UHCO's class ranks and grades, these students too have numbers good enough for medicine, but chose to pursue optometry instead. These folks are the elite, in my opinion - brilliant pupils all around.
 

mwsapphire

Office of the medical examiner.
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2017
Messages
3,580
Reaction score
2,985
DO schools teach all the material of MD schools plus OMM, I'm not sure why people act like MD curriculum is harder. Please.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
DO schools teach all the material of MD schools plus OMM, I'm not sure why people act like MD curriculum is harder. Please.

They're all hard - they're doctorate programs after all, so they expect a higher quality of study.

At this point, I'm just hoping to get into somewhere. I reapplied for optometry school, but I know this is going to haunt me there...and at other institutions for other healthcare fields.

In other words, I'm in deep s#$%.
 

Prehealth1011

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2015
Messages
735
Reaction score
1,390
I’m too lazy to read the whole thread but consider Anesthesiology Assistant school if you’re in a state where they can practice. Very good ROI with that degree
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
I’m too lazy to read the whole thread but consider Anesthesiology Assistant school if you’re in a state where they can practice. Very good ROI with that degree

Would they take somebody who failed out of optometry school? I mean...I'm doing measures to make sure that doesn't happen again, but I'm worried about how this is going to scar the other applications.

...and you're right. They do have a great return on investment. Which standardized test is required to get through? I do have the classes finished, if nothing else.
 

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
Question to those who are still looking at the thread, is there a way to prepare my graduate GPA? I took a look at my OptomCAS...and my lackluster performance really dented my overall GPA, especially in the sciences.
 

Weirdy

Full Member
Volunteer Staff
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
3,623
Would they take somebody who failed out of optometry school? I mean...I'm doing measures to make sure that doesn't happen again, but I'm worried about how this is going to scar the other applications.

...and you're right. They do have a great return on investment. Which standardized test is required to get through? I do have the classes finished, if nothing else.
For AA school I don't think they'd care about your graduate school course or history. And if they do, your stats were already high enough to get in.

Look up their testing and grade requirements. Quick google should suffice. Find a school near you locally so you can cut down cost.
 

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
For AA school I don't think they'd care about your graduate school course or history. And if they do, your stats were already high enough to get in.

Look up their testing and grade requirements. Quick google should suffice. Find a school near you locally so you can cut down cost.

Okay. Thank you very much.

I'm definitely searching up options.
 

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
To add onto this thread, I did apply again for some optometry schools…but they’re coming back as pre-interview rejections.

I’m not surprised - it is probably due to my failures at the last optometry school.

To those still looking, how can I improve my application to show schools that I won’t repeat my mistakes again?

Work some more at an eye institute? Redo my OAT? Cram more upper division undergrad science courses? I’m kind of lost on this end.
 

gyngyn

Alta California
Staff member
Administrator
Volunteer Staff
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2011
Messages
26,900
Reaction score
50,080
To add onto this thread, I did apply again for some optometry schools…but they’re coming back as pre-interview rejections.

I’m not surprised - it is probably due to my failures at the last optometry school.

To those still looking, how can I improve my application to show schools that I won’t repeat my mistakes again?

Work some more at an eye institute? Redo my OAT? Cram more upper division undergrad science courses? I’m kind of lost on this end.
Would you like to me to restore your first post so that anyone interested in responding has context?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Leftpaw

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Messages
122
Reaction score
17
Would you like to me to restore your first post so that anyone interested in responding has context?

Oh sure! Maybe redact the schools…or I can do that. I shouldn’t have put the school’s name in my message.
 
Top