Makati2008

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Basically went to dinnner with the wife tonight and this lady started talking to us out of the blue. She states that she is a doctor and recieved her doctorate from colorado springs(which I should have know something was up because I have never met a MD/DO ever do that). After introducing myself as a med. student and asking her about local residencies in the area she was still stuck on her being a doctor and proceeded to keep blowing her degree up more and more. She then goes onto bitch about money woes and poor reimbursement etc...

So after finishing dinner my wife states-Hey makati I don't think she is a doctor. I am like why do you say that she did say she was a doctor and a Physician during dinner. She was like well think about it how many MD/DO do you hear of saying they got a doctorate instead of I got my medical degree or MD/DO at school x or y. I kind of laughed and said lets google colorado springs and the letters dnp and guess what pops up for a dnp program and NO medical school.

Is this a legal thing for the DNPs to do now? Also I am in the deep south and it appears that the Docs are more accepting of them(the DNP) then they were only 5 years ago. Is there any legislation to stop this practice(them saying they are doctors/Physicians)? Sorry if this is a odd question but if you check on my post history I haven't been on sdn in a while. Also typing on a smart phone if it looks like jibberish lol.
 
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Is this a legal thing for the DNPs to do now? Also I am in the deep south and it appears that the Docs are more accepting of them(the DNP) then they were only 5 years ago. Is there any legislation to stop this practice(them saying they are doctors/Physicians)?

At least six states (Arizona, Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia) have legislatively allowed doctorally educated NPs to be addressed as "doctor" as long as they clarify that they are NPs. Seven states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutory restrictions against doctorally educated NPs being addressed as "doctor."

http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/2008_Pearson_Report.pdf

I am unaware of any states that would permit a DNP to represent themselves as a "physician."

Contrary to your experience, Southern states, in general, tend to be viewed as less friendly to NPs from a regulatory standpoint by those seeking independent practice.

http://www.achi.net/HCR Docs/2011HCRWorkforceResources/Access to Care APNs.pdf
 
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Makati2008

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Just read the bottom link and it is quite interesting. I will have to go back and read the top on a little later.

I actually thought that this was very strange and I am originally from the area and I am shocked to hear her talk the way that she did(after seeing she was a DNP) due to the fact that back when I was trying to work in the area PA/NP both had a lot of restrictions and doctors not really being ultra-receptive to us being in the area.

Also my stance on Mid-level independent practice remains the same(even though I am a PA in med. school now)->If you want to play doctor then go back to med. school. Also the members that brag about practicing independently I hope they don't make any mistakes that could harm a patient.
 
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ghost dog

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At least six states (Arizona, Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia) have legislatively allowed doctorally educated NPs to be addressed as "doctor" as long as they clarify that they are NPs. Seven states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutory restrictions against doctorally educated NPs being addressed as "doctor."

http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/2008_Pearson_Report.pdf

I am unaware of any states that would permit a DNP to represent themselves as a "physician."

Contrary to your experience, Southern states, in general, tend to be viewed as less friendly to NPs from a regulatory standpoint by those seeking independent practice.

http://www.achi.net/HCR%20Docs/2011HCRWorkforceResources/Access%20to%20Care%20APNs.pdf

If you read this propaganda, it goes on about having these mid levels in "remote areas."

Sure, all of the DNPs are going to rural areas where MDs don't want to go , thereby benefitting patients ? Yeah righttt.

It then goes on to discuss DNPs prescriptive powers in regards to controlled substances (North Carolina). Hey, I'm not a doctor but I play one on TV.

"Noctor, I've got this really bad back pain, and nothing helps except this stuff that begins with an Oxycontin..."

Recipe for disaster.
 
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If you read this propaganda, it goes on about having these mid levels in "remote areas."

Sure, all of the DNPs are going to rural areas where MDs don't want to go , thereby benefitting patients ? Yeah righttt.

This issue is given a great deal of lip service, but isn't supported by the data. Studies done by the Graham Center show that NPs are concentrated in the same geographic areas as physicians, even in those states with independent practice.

http://www.tafp.org/advocacy/resources/PCCIssueBriefScopeGeo.pdf
 

zenman

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I'm in a rural town of 30,000. Some people I treat in this town are depressed because they are trapped and can't leave. I travel 4 hours round trip to shop at a mall or get something to eat that's not at the top place in town, Chili's.:)
 

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"Physician" is a protected term that specifically refers to MD or DO in every state just like "nurse". "Doctor" is not, except as noted above.

So, this person can get herself into a lot of legal hot water if she continues to misuse the term.
 
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TikiTorches

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According to Illinois licensing, a chiropractor is a physician.
And who is going to enforce this terminology?
The nursing board?
haahahahahhahahahahhh

The medical board is too busy protecting the public from doctors. (HSF)
 

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I don't think an NP or PA should call themselves a doctor or a physician in the hospital setting, this can cause confusion. I can understand if your an NP working in a clinic that's run by NP's, then it'll be hard for a patient to get confused, esp. if you address yourself as dr x, your NP, but i do believe the doctor/physician title in the hospital setting should only be reserved for MD's and DO's. Most patients won't even know the difference btwn an MD or DO.
 
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I would never go into a DNP or NP program. I personally am 100% happy just being a RN. You actually do not have to have these stupid degrees in nursing to make good money or even a NP salary. I know plenty of BSN nurses who make in the 100,000 to 110,000 range just being regular RN's and working (myself included). Not all nurses are behind this NP/DNP stuff. If nurses just knew you can make exactly the same amount JUST WORKING.
 
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Zenman1

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I would never go into a DNP or NP program. I personally am 100% happy just being a RN. You actually do not have to have these stupid degrees in nursing to make good money or even a NP salary. I know plenty of BSN nurses who make in the 100,000 to 110,000 range just being regular RN's and working (myself included). Not all nurses are behind this NP/DNP stuff. If nurses just knew you can make exactly the same amount JUST WORKING.

Good for you and thanks for your opinion which probably no one cares about. I earned my "stupid NP degree" from Rush University, which you might want to google. I was tired of "JUST WORKING" as an RN for 37 years and working OT to make decent money. Wish I could survive making as little as you make.
 
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Good for you and thanks for your opinion which probably no one cares about. I earned my "stupid NP degree" from Rush University, which you might want to google. I was tired of "JUST WORKING" as an RN for 37 years and working OT to make decent money. Wish I could survive making as little as you make.


HAHAHA little as I make... I work a for a big health insurance company in NYC...I see 3 patients a day and make 100,000 a year as base... not including 0.03% bump a year and 8 weeks of PTO.. I am done latest by 2PM everyday.. have fun with your NP degree and your student debt.... "Doctor Nurse".... If you really think you can safely practice as a PCP you're insane... take the step 3 let's see how you do
 
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I became a NP because, after enjoying a standing career, I thought I'd like healthcare. Lo and behold, I do like it, but I never cared to invest in personal and familial sacrifices to go to medical school and then pursue residency training. Don't get me wrong. Education and learning is huge in my household, but I had other priorities over added schooling. I know many physicians find that logic troubling, but I'm ok with that. As it happens, I don't have any physician patients so it's never a problem at work. I chose not to remain employed as a nurse, unlike my colleague above, because I never liked standard nurse duties so no amount of hours or pay would have held me to general nursing. As an aside, my original interest was in being a PA, but there wasn't anywhere to go so I enrolled at the local state uni. for an additional B.S. in nursing.

Stepping outside of the box, I really don't care who calls themselves doctor or who gets called "doc." I suppose my initial college experience trained me to think of anyone with a doctorate as a "doctor." While in law enforcement, I was assigned to SWAT for a while and served as team medic among other things. The .mil guys yielded my title to be "doc." When my dentist or optometrist call themselves "doctor" I don't think anyone mistakes that for "physician," but physicians aren't jumping out of the water over that. When a clinical psychologist or researcher introduces himself as "doctor" in a clinical setting no one becomes soured over it. While working as a RN, I, and most male nurses, were often referred to as "doc" or "doctor," and even with correction people persisted in calling me that. Here's the crux. If I wanted doctoral training in any field I'd pursue it. The fact is, I don't. I've considered it. Believe me. Even in NP training I considered throwing it all aside, many times, to pursue medical training instead, but I didn't want to send my housewife back to work and quit paying my mortgage.

Should the title of physician be protected? Absolutely. I think so, and I think that's where punitive action should come into play when people go around referring themselves as a physician. For that matter, many other licensed fields have protected titles as well. Regardless of what you call yourself, the patient is going to keep coming if they're satisfied with the treatment.


Calling yourself a doctor in a health care setting is dangerous and misleading... when great you have a doctorate degree in nursing... who cares...
 
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I dare say, you're a rather impudent fellow. No one here is pushing for the title of "Doctor Nurse." You dug out an old thread to spew your wrath. I suspect you were recently harmed by a DNP, perhaps emotionally. It's quite lovely that you've nailed down the niche position you have. You shouldn't really be so fixated on your income. It's really not that much.

I was reading the discussion, I didn't know there was a time limit. What other rules do I need to abide by on this site- Oh Great Psych NP- please tell thou. Thanks I'll take my very not that much income any day.
 

Zenman1

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HAHAHA little as I make... I work a for a big health insurance company in NYC...I see 3 patients a day and make 100,000 a year as base... not including 0.03% bump a year and 8 weeks of PTO.. I am done latest by 2PM everyday.. have fun with your NP degree and your student debt.... "Doctor Nurse".... If you really think you can safely practice as a PCP you're insane... take the step 3 let's see how you do

Remember in your earlier post where you talked about NURSING, being a REGULAR RN, and JUST WORKING (see below)? Well, you're not doing it. You're an insurance nurse, one of the lowest forms of life on earth working for a company that customers pay $$ to for services, only to have said insurance company try their best to deny those services so their CEO's can rake in millions in salaries and perks. I went to NP school to increase my knowledge. I'm sorry you didn't chose that route and decided to take the laziest job you could find, working as a nurse…if you can go so far as to call yourself one. I took a $35K pay cut to work in my current stressful job as the sole prescriber in an embedded behavioral health team serving our Soldiers. I run like a hamster on a wheel every day. I'm in my office by at least 0630 (when thousands of Soldiers are gathering to do their PT) and I rarely leave at 1630. I not only have to know "psych stuff" but also primary care, in spite of having PA's and physicians to do primary care. I ordered TBI and opthalmalogy consults on my very last patient today (and I'm a psych guy). He was already being seen by primary care, cardiology, and pulmonary due to a lung granuloma, chest pain, back pain and a host of other ailments that he is anxious and depressed about…a big load for a 22 yr old fellow. And I found other areas that needed to be addressed in our initial session. AND YOU DID WHAT? Now, if you don't think I can safely practice without taking a multiple-choice exam why don't you come go face-to-face with the team I work with, or the primary care docs who know me, or the Soldiers I treat, or their wives and kids who are glad to see their fathers and spouses function better. Jeez, I hope the moderators grant me this opportunity to tell you that you are a freaking idiot!


I would never go into a DNP or NP program. I personally am 100% happy just being a RN. You actually do not have to have these stupid degrees in nursing to make good money or even a NP salary. I know plenty of BSN nurses who make in the 100,000 to 110,000 range just being regular RN's and working (myself included). Not all nurses are behind this NP/DNP stuff. If nurses just knew you can make exactly the same amount JUST WORKING.
 

Boatswain2PA

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Of course, we have to have those "insurance nurses" because otherwise people would try to get the insurance company to pay for their weekly "stares at goats Zen-craft" session.
 
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Growing up long before I knew what a PA was the PA who regularly saw my family and I was regularly called "doctor" and never corrected any of us that I can remember. Maybe he was just being polite?
 
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Boatswain2PA

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Big difference between introducing yourself as a PA or NP, but not correcting every patient who calls you "Doc"........and introducing yourself as Doctor in a medical environment.

If you introduce yourself as Doctor to my patient & you are not a physician, be prepared to look like the idiot you are because I will call you out on it, and it will not be pretty.
 
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@BklynRN I am also against DNP calling themselves doctor in medical settings because it is somewhat confusing. Let say if pharmacist, PT, OT and all these healthcare professionals decide to do the same, it will become a huge problem. Patients will not be able to distinguish physicians vs. non-physicians since most people (if not all) equate doctor to physician in medical settings... I don't know if that would harm patients though, but I can see that will become a huge problem if all healthcare professionals who earn a doctorate degree decide to call themselves doctors as well in these settings...
 
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@Psych NP Guy I don't know if you read past posts of Zenman1 in this forum... If you do, you will see that he comes across as a very delusional dude.
 

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I'm ok with someone saying "I'm Dr. ____, a nurse practitioner/pharmacist/physical therapist/podiatrist/physician/etc" (I've seen this multiple times at two hospitals I've worked at), and the ID badge clearly states their title and degree. No "I'm Dr. ___ with anesthesia", meanwhile it's a CRNA.

And NPs most definitely are not physicians, and shouldn't be called physicians, no matter what.
 
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Remember in your earlier post where you talked about NURSING, being a REGULAR RN, and JUST WORKING (see below)? Well, you're not doing it. You're an insurance nurse, one of the lowest forms of life on earth working for a company that customers pay $$ to for services, only to have said insurance company try their best to deny those services so their CEO's can rake in millions in salaries and perks. I went to NP school to increase my knowledge. I'm sorry you didn't chose that route and decided to take the laziest job you could find, working as a nurse…if you can go so far as to call yourself one. I took a $35K pay cut to work in my current stressful job as the sole prescriber in an embedded behavioral health team serving our Soldiers. I run like a hamster on a wheel every day. I'm in my office by at least 0630 (when thousands of Soldiers are gathering to do their PT) and I rarely leave at 1630. I not only have to know "psych stuff" but also primary care, in spite of having PA's and physicians to do primary care. I ordered TBI and opthalmalogy consults on my very last patient today (and I'm a psych guy). He was already being seen by primary care, cardiology, and pulmonary due to a lung granuloma, chest pain, back pain and a host of other ailments that he is anxious and depressed about…a big load for a 22 yr old fellow. And I found other areas that needed to be addressed in our initial session. AND YOU DID WHAT? Now, if you don't think I can safely practice without taking a multiple-choice exam why don't you come go face-to-face with the team I work with, or the primary care docs who know me, or the Soldiers I treat, or their wives and kids who are glad to see their fathers and spouses function better. Jeez, I hope the moderators grant me this opportunity to tell you that you are a freaking idiot!


I'm an insurance nurse righhhhttttt.... just shows literally how ignorant you are and how you know ZERO about long term care. I work for a Managed Medicaid Long Term Care Program (MLTC) which is state funded, not a private program, number one. Secondly, I have helped over hundreds of people avoid long term institutional placement and safely live out their days in the peace of their own homes with personal care assistance. MANY OF THEM BEING VETERANS!!! I have gone to court many times advocating for them to receive the services they need. I in no way have "culled my ambitions", sorry if I have an opinion that is different from the majority of other nurses. Yes, you might be able to spot things better than an average nurse but you are in no shape or form a close to being a doctor or obtaining the knowledge a doctor has and you should not parade around as a "doctor" in a clinical setting.

Moderator since you gave him a pass please give me one- I have a chip on my shoulder? It seems like to patrol these boards looking for anybody who doesn't agree with you!!! lol you literally reply back in snap, what are you are trolling while ordering your TBI and optho consults lol... sorry I couldn't stomp you sooner but I have a thing called a life and was away on vacation.

Also, when you're loved one gets a chronic condition and needs long term help and can no longer stay safe at home. Please by all means tell the nurse that shows up to do the eval that they are the lowest type of nurse there is. You old clown.
 

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I'm ok with someone saying "I'm Dr. ____, a nurse practitioner/pharmacist/physical therapist/podiatrist/physician/etc" (I've seen this multiple times at two hospitals I've worked at), and the ID badge clearly states their title and degree. No "I'm Dr. ___ with anesthesia", meanwhile it's a CRNA.

And NPs most definitely are not physicians, and shouldn't be called physicians, no matter what.
'I am Dr. Perez, a [insert].' The majority of patients won't pay attention to second part of that sentence. In fact, the hospital I used to work at advised a PA that has a PhD to stop doing that because most patients he saw thought he was a physician.
 
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He's got a chip on his shoulder about something which is unfortunate. He seems like a young fellow that had some culled ambition. It's rather sad. I do hope he makes the living he proposes for he's found solace in that. I suggested in another post a young medical student replying read Dale Carnegie. This guy could use that as well.

Bklyn, even though we're still "just nurses," most NPs become NPs because they do learn more (despite what you seem to believe), are able to do more, and thus have a more direct role in improving the health of their patients. It helps financially too. I only spent 49k on my master's, and that's a sizable return on my investment. Your steep salary is still only about 44.5% of my pay can be at five days per week (I only choose to work four). If I were as stupid as you propose, even without a doctorate further dulling my intellect, perhaps I too could return to being a RN and doing rewarding things like insurance calls. I really don't wish to argue with you, but I think you're doing yourself and nursing in general a disservice each time you post a reply.

So not wanting to be a NP means I have no yearning to learn more? OK!... The fact of the matter is, most NP programs are not hard. I have heard this so many times from people who have done them, both online and in classroom. Online programs, you post two responses a week to "a research article" you do that for about the first year then you take maybe two hard classes. Then you fool around a little bit in clinicals not really doing anything (just shadowing) and then you take your test and you're a NP. That is not kidding how it was explained to me by sooooooooooooo many nurses. I guess you're safe enough to recognize a UTI but do really think you can recognize something rare or drastically out of your knowledge base? When that day comes do you really think you can handle that? Do you really want a loved one to be seen by someone like that?

Sorry by doing the entire nursing profession a disservice but just stating that I'm OK with being a Registered Nurse. I guess that makes sense.
 

Zenman1

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@Psych NP Guy I don't know if you read past posts of Zenman1 in this forum... If you do, you will see that he comes across as a very delusional dude.

You can call me delusional if you want, but I'll bet you'll never agree to meet me in front of a group of your peers and try to prove it. I've spent a lot of time and effort trying to understand why some people get better and others don't, in spite of the best Western medicine has to offer. I'll bet you haven't, and just keep plugging away with the tools you have in your toolbox. That's fine if that's what you want to do, but don't poke jabs at others who think outside the box.

If I were delusional, then I probably would not have the security clearance I have with the DoD. I would not be allowed to be the sole, and very busy, prescriber for an embedded behavioral health team, with all the watchdogs I have above me. I'm sure all the professionals I work with would quickly weed me out. I would not have the largest group in the history of this entire department, while other providers struggle to get enough people to make a group. I would not be the most popular grand rounds presenter with 8 so far in less than 3 years. You want me to go on or do you want to keep hiding behind your posts?

"Many shamanic techniques make good psychological and scientific sense. In short, shamanism certainly cannot be neatly dismissed as the confused productions of primitive or pathological minds. Something much more remarkable, rewarding, and profound is going on." Roger Walsh, M.D., Ph.D.
 

Zenman1

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I'm an insurance nurse righhhhttttt.... just shows literally how ignorant you are and how you know ZERO about long term care. I work for a Managed Medicaid Long Term Care Program (MLTC) which is state funded, not a private program, number one. Secondly, I have helped over hundreds of people avoid long term institutional placement and safely live out their days in the peace of their own homes with personal care assistance. MANY OF THEM BEING VETERANS!!! I have gone to court many times advocating for them to receive the services they need. I in no way have "culled my ambitions", sorry if I have an opinion that is different from the majority of other nurses. Yes, you might be able to spot things better than an average nurse but you are in no shape or form a close to being a doctor or obtaining the knowledge a doctor has and you should not parade around as a "doctor" in a clinical setting.

Moderator since you gave him a pass please give me one- I have a chip on my shoulder? It seems like to patrol these boards looking for anybody who doesn't agree with you!!! lol you literally reply back in snap, what are you are trolling while ordering your TBI and optho consults lol... sorry I couldn't stomp you sooner but I have a thing called a life and was away on vacation.

Also, when you're loved one gets a chronic condition and needs long term help and can no longer stay safe at home. Please by all means tell the nurse that shows up to do the eval that they are the lowest type of nurse there is. You old clown.

You're correct, I know little about long term care (I did do home health care in the past) as I prefer acute care. But when you come on and post like you did then you must expect others to jump on you.
 

Zenman1

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So not wanting to be a NP means I have no yearning to learn more? OK!... The fact of the matter is, most NP programs are not hard. I have heard this so many times from people who have done them, both online and in classroom. Online programs, you post two responses a week to "a research article" you do that for about the first year then you take maybe two hard classes. Then you fool around a little bit in clinicals not really doing anything (just shadowing) and then you take your test and you're a NP. That is not kidding how it was explained to me by sooooooooooooo many nurses. I guess you're safe enough to recognize a UTI but do really think you can recognize something rare or drastically out of your knowledge base? When that day comes do you really think you can handle that? Do you really want a loved one to be seen by someone like that?

Sorry by doing the entire nursing profession a disservice but just stating that I'm OK with being a Registered Nurse. I guess that makes sense.

"You keep hearing…." So you're not an expert and are only repeating what your friends have said. I see an NP for primary care, as did both my parents. Well, they also had acute care NPs making rounds on them such as pulmonary and others when hospitalized. I have picked up Grave's disease and referred them as that's not my area. Couple weeks ago I picked up REM Sleep Behavior disorder that had slipped by primary care, neurology, and pulmonary docs. I'll treat that myself but have no problem working as a team as we can't always be at hundred percent. Last week I was going to send a guy to his primary care for stuttering, but he didn't like his provider so I sent him straight to speech for an eval. So yes, I do treat everything that happens in my area, and I refer a lot especially to TBI, neurology, sleep medicine for studies, urology, etc. and I do that because the patient needs treatment by them. I'm busy enough in my own area. Quit repeating what your friends say. In just one of my psychopharm classes we went through every chapter but one in Stahl's 800 page textbook. Nope, NP school is not as difficult as medical school but medical school is also not as difficult as other programs.
 

Zenman1

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I have to agree with Zenman on many of these points. Routinely, those of us in psychiatry ARE the primary care provider so it behooves us to "pick up the slack," as it were. Neurology, neuropsychology, clinical psychology, sleep medicine, endocrine, speech pathology, are frequent sources of referral. Unfortunately, many psych NPs have never really worked with somatic medicine so a lot of them don't pick that up, but you'll find many NPs and physicians routinely "pass the buck" on matters that aren't within their primary scope. The reasons range from malpractice insurance exclusions to lack of care. We too went through all of Stahl, which like it or love it, is actually a very good source. I realize there is a faction who believes it is too cartoonish. When many physicians have spoken about revolves around medical school volume rather than difficulty so in an early reply Bklyn, you asked that we pass Step III. Actually, NP training, and this to our detriment, is highly compartmentalized, and thus there is no intention for NPs to have that broad of training. Again, I don't agree with this, but psychiatry NP training details psychiatry. Family practice NP training involves primary care and minor injury and the expense of the highly acute. Acute care NP training sacrifices most things of a primary care or minor nature. The field of NPs developed to fill in shortages and provide better access to care. Evidence suggests that NPs, in their area of practice, provide quality care and fill the need for which they were trained. I concede that NP training is lacking in many respects and replete with a lot of foolishness, but until we collectively argue that cause rather than disparage the field entirely not much will change.

I was glad Stahl put in a lot of pics as I'm a visual learner! I also looked at PE videos made by physicians, and after a few times, could knock a complete exam out easily. I am glad, however, that I do not have to do them in outpatient BH.
 
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Again, no one here offered that NP scholastics are difficult. My program was not, however, my practicum experiences involved me seeing my own patients. There wasn't really any shadowing other than on orientation days where I learned that particular institution's charting system. Much could be done to improve and uniform advanced practice training just as much could be done to improve general nursing training. In fact, my undergraduate preparation in nursing was largely vapid and shallow, but I (a career changer) was informed that nursing was a more biological, diagnostic entity. Boy, don't we all know that's not the case! Like it or not, NPs are here to stay, and I have a good job that I enjoy and do well with. I'm quite pleased to learn you're happy with your life path.

you two are annoying and exhausting.. it seems like you really need to justify your professions online on a daily basis... sounds exhausting...I'll just let you two "win" seems like you need it and you need the justification but bye bye bye
 

Zenman1

5+ Year Member
Oct 31, 2013
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you two are annoying and exhausting.. it seems like you really need to justify your professions online on a daily basis... sounds exhausting...I'll just let you two "win" seems like you need it and you need the justification but bye bye bye

Actually we justify it daily by seeing patients all day long. If you are brave enough, send me a pm and I'll see if I can get permission for you to shadow me.
 
7

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Ok, SO I want to start off by saying I do not like when people are arrogant or ignorant. The D in DNP stands for doctorates degree or in other words a PHD in nursing. It takes on an average two years to fulfill The nursing prerequisites usually with a GPA of 3.5 an higher along with a 62% or higher on the TEAS test that is a test a lot like the MCAT for MD's. Most schools only take the best students and usually will take on average of 40 students per year out of thousands and thousands of applications. Usually takes people 5 years to be accepted. After being accepted you still have 2 more very stressful years of a nursing program. Upon completion you need to pass the Nclex that takes about 5 hours and very difficult to pass, your degree is basically useless without passing this exam. So to get your BSN it takes 4 years. Then you can apply for A DNP program, but again very selective with GPA and work experience and letters of recommendation etc. you will receive a Masters and doctorate or PHD in nursing, upon completion of the program and typically takes 4 years as a full time student but can go as long as 6 years. Upon completion you then need to pass another exam for your nurse practitioner license. You also have the chance to specialize in different areas. Also as a nurse every two years you need to renew your license with continuing education classes that never stops. So you looking at 10 years of school. I personally would and want to be called doctor after this lol. I believe with med school you have a BA or BS your choice but a BA is a lot easier than BS. Also DNP and MD take a lot of the classes especially the science classes. Also with MD is 4 year BA or BS and a MCAT with no medical experience like DNP 4 year med school which 8 years of school and 3 to 7 years in residency. So let's just say 8 plus 3 is 11 which is the minimum for md and 10 for DNP, there is a one year difference lol . I truly believe that if there were more opportunities for nurses with a BSN to go into MEDICAL school, then you would see less DNP and more MD's. Like a lot of these nurses, me included once you've done a BSN program and put a lot of time into it it's hard to walk away, you fill stuck with no options other than DNP or CRNA. Did I also mention that DNP do 2 years of clinicals as a RN and 2 years of clinicals as a NP or DNP, anyways I have respect for anyone that is willing to put that amount of time and effort into education. Thanks

:corny:

2.5 year old necro post defibrillated back to life to start more drama. Requesting a lock.
 
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W19

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Ok, SO I want to start off by saying I do not like when people are arrogant or ignorant. The D in DNP stands for doctorates degree or in other words a PHD in nursing. It takes on an average two years to fulfill The nursing prerequisites usually with a GPA of 3.5 an higher along with a 62% or higher on the TEAS test that is a test a lot like the MCAT for MD's. Most schools only take the best students and usually will take on average of 40 students per year out of thousands and thousands of applications. Usually takes people 5 years to be accepted. After being accepted you still have 2 more very stressful years of a nursing program. Upon completion you need to pass the Nclex that takes about 5 hours and very difficult to pass, your degree is basically useless without passing this exam. So to get your BSN it takes 4 years. Then you can apply for A DNP program, but again very selective with GPA and work experience and letters of recommendation etc. you will receive a Masters and doctorate or PHD in nursing, upon completion of the program and typically takes 4 years as a full time student but can go as long as 6 years. Upon completion you then need to pass another exam for your nurse practitioner license. You also have the chance to specialize in different areas. Also as a nurse every two years you need to renew your license with continuing education classes that never stops. So you looking at 10 years of school. I personally would and want to be called doctor after this lol. I believe with med school you have a BA or BS your choice but a BA is a lot easier than BS. Also DNP and MD take a lot of the classes especially the science classes. Also with MD is 4 year BA or BS and a MCAT with no medical experience like DNP 4 year med school which 8 years of school and 3 to 7 years in residency. So let's just say 8 plus 3 is 11 which is the minimum for md and 10 for DNP, there is a one year difference lol . I truly believe that if there were more opportunities for nurses with a BSN to go into MEDICAL school, then you would see less DNP and more MD's. Like a lot of these nurses, me included once you've done a BSN program and put a lot of time into it it's hard to walk away, you fill stuck with no options other than DNP or CRNA. Did I also mention that DNP do 2 years of clinicals as a RN and 2 years of clinicals as a NP or DNP, anyways I have respect for anyone that is willing to put that amount of time and effort into education. Thanks
Lol...
 
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SpartanWolverine

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Ok, SO I want to start off by saying I do not like when people are arrogant or ignorant. The D in DNP stands for doctorates degree or in other words a PHD in nursing. It takes on an average two years to fulfill The nursing prerequisites usually with a GPA of 3.5 an higher along with a 62% or higher on the TEAS test that is a test a lot like the MCAT for MD's. Most schools only take the best students and usually will take on average of 40 students per year out of thousands and thousands of applications. Usually takes people 5 years to be accepted. After being accepted you still have 2 more very stressful years of a nursing program. Upon completion you need to pass the Nclex that takes about 5 hours and very difficult to pass, your degree is basically useless without passing this exam. So to get your BSN it takes 4 years. Then you can apply for A DNP program, but again very selective with GPA and work experience and letters of recommendation etc. you will receive a Masters and doctorate or PHD in nursing, upon completion of the program and typically takes 4 years as a full time student but can go as long as 6 years. Upon completion you then need to pass another exam for your nurse practitioner license. You also have the chance to specialize in different areas. Also as a nurse every two years you need to renew your license with continuing education classes that never stops. So you looking at 10 years of school. I personally would and want to be called doctor after this lol. I believe with med school you have a BA or BS your choice but a BA is a lot easier than BS. Also DNP and MD take a lot of the classes especially the science classes. Also with MD is 4 year BA or BS and a MCAT with no medical experience like DNP 4 year med school which 8 years of school and 3 to 7 years in residency. So let's just say 8 plus 3 is 11 which is the minimum for md and 10 for DNP, there is a one year difference lol . I truly believe that if there were more opportunities for nurses with a BSN to go into MEDICAL school, then you would see less DNP and more MD's. Like a lot of these nurses, me included once you've done a BSN program and put a lot of time into it it's hard to walk away, you fill stuck with no options other than DNP or CRNA. Did I also mention that DNP do 2 years of clinicals as a RN and 2 years of clinicals as a NP or DNP, anyways I have respect for anyone that is willing to put that amount of time and effort into education. Thanks
:whoa:
 
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