Doohickey550

Family Medicine Resident
10+ Year Member
Feb 9, 2009
51
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Hi all,

For those out there who run their own practices, especially if you run a direct primary care practice, how important is it to have/maintain board certification? My plan after residency is to own my own DPC practice where I will not be taking insurance, nor will I be interested in hospital privileges. Would board certification have any benefit in such a setting?

Thank you.
 
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Doohickey550

Family Medicine Resident
10+ Year Member
Feb 9, 2009
51
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I think the OP is in residency and was considering being board eligible but not certified and not sitting for the exam
I am actually strongly considering leaving after intern year. I didn’t mention that specifically in this post though.
 

Lurts

2+ Year Member
Mar 25, 2018
28
64
Status
Fellow [Any Field], Attending Physician
I am actually strongly considering leaving after intern year. I didn’t mention that specifically in this post though.
My two cents: terrible idea that will forever limit your ability to work the job you want in the area you want. Even if you find a gig you’re happy with at some point, you’ll have limited opportunity to pivot into something different as your life and preferences change. If nothing else, finish residency and AT LEAST be board eligible, but really just take the damn test and be done with it. You’ve come too far to short change yourself now.

But, your life, education, and career, not mine - do as you please.
 

Blue Dog

Fides et ratio.
Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2006
12,709
5,681
Status
Attending Physician
I think the OP is in residency and was considering being board eligible but not certified and not sitting for the exam
Lack of board certification in this day and age suggests you're either stupid or lazy. Neither looks good on a resume.
 

TableMD

2+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2015
149
209
Status
Attending Physician
I think leaving after one year is insane. Have you considered switching to a different specialty?
 

lowbudget

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 4, 2003
1,380
31
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Board certification FORCES you to stay current. Once you're out, you're not going to want to study or change your practice much. But medicine and science evolves. As much as we hate it, it does force you to stay current and relevant. Imagine, finishing residency when you're 30-something and practicing the same way until you're 65. Medicine doesn't evolve in 35 years? Sure, you can try to learn on your own. But there's no feedback mechanism. You're not going to do practice questions if there's no test to force you to, especially when you'd rather do something else, like be with your family, go on vacation, roll around in the money you're making.
 

brianmartin

10+ Year Member
Nov 12, 2006
1,044
40
Status
Attending Physician
I'd recommend it. It keeps many doors open that otherwise would be closed.
Keep in mind, you don't ever have to deal with the AAFP ever again after residency. They don't issue your board certification. The ABFM does.
And in my 3 years in practice so far, they've been fairly easy to deal with. The certification process is not too bad, and it's mostly self-directed. I don't spend a huge amount of time on it, and its nice to have access to modules whenever I want. You pay your $200/year, you do the certification activities and practice questions, you enter your CME that you've done, and thats basically it. It feels good to have a centralized place where you can go to prove that you are current and certified.
 

styphon

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 25, 2001
722
286
New york
Status
Attending Physician
I am going to pile on here and agree.

Do not leave residency after one year. If you ever want to do something outside of DPC you will have no chance. I had our certification lady call the insurance companies to see if they required me to be BC to bill, ALL OF THEM (even medicaid) SAID YES except one small insurance company.

That would mean I would not get paid for >90% of the patients unless they paid cash.
 

cabinbuilder

Urgent Care Physician
10+ Year Member
Nov 21, 2005
4,567
2,407
Texas
Status
Attending Physician
I am actually strongly considering leaving after intern year. I didn’t mention that specifically in this post though.
Not very wise. You would never be able to do locums or get a permanent job. DPC is good in theory but if it falls through you would be left with no options but to finish residency. Just finish and do it right.
 
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