ocdp09

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Hey guys, Im a new user here and I had a question regarding DO's that maybe someone could answer. Im well aware of the process for a MD to become a specialist (like a surgeon, radiologist, etc.) but im not really sure of the DO's. I read that DO's can become specialists as well but is this realistic? Because, I mean your comepeting with MD's correct? or does that not make a difference. Anyway, does anybody know the whole process for a DO to become a specialist? Is it shorter or longer than an MD? Is it realistic that hospitals and residence will hire me at good hospitals? If someone can help thanks!
 

Buckeye(OH)

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Honestly dude, did you even read the FAQs or search?

Yes. Its realistic.
 

dtrain5

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I think it all depends on what kind of specialty you are interested in. Yes, DO's can specialize in any field that MD's can. And, as far as I know, the process for specializing is very similiar if not identical. It is important to be realistic, for most specialties, it is more difficult to specialize as a DO.
 
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ocdp09

ocdp09

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thanks for the insight guys
 

USArmyDoc

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dtrain5 said:
I think it all depends on what kind of specialty you are interested in. Yes, DO's can specialize in any field that MD's can. And, as far as I know, the process for specializing is very similiar if not identical. It is important to be realistic, for most specialties, it is more difficult to specialize as a DO.

I love hearing all this. It is not that much harder to specialize. I know a lot of DO specialists. People really need to do their research.
 

Dancing Doctor

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USArmyDoc said:
I love hearing all this. It is not that much harder to specialize. I know a lot of DO specialists. People really need to do their research.
Eh, they are the ones who will do ANYTHING except go to a DO school.
 

USArmyDoc

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Dancing Doctor said:
Eh, they are the ones who will do ANYTHING except go to a DO school.

Eh, whatever.....Everyone I speak to tells me not to even think about it. Go to medical school in the US...PERIOD!
 

Taty

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Can you become a general/trauma surgeon as DO?
 

Dancing Doctor

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Taty said:
Can you become a general/trauma surgeon as DO?
Have you done any research at all?

Yes.
 

PlasticMan

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I know this may surprise some of you, but I actually know a DO plastic surgeon *GASP* :eek:


:rolleyes:
 

bkpa2med

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My grandfather's neurologist is a DO, proud to say also a graduate of PCOM.
 

Hoberto

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Do people approach their studies the same way they approach finding information about a career they plan to do for the next several decades?
 

Hoberto

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It would be a lot easier to just list the specialties you cannot do with your DO training and residency.

Let's see....

Podiatry
Dentistry
Nurse
Physician's Assistant
Nurse Anesthetist
Psychologist
Social Work (licensed)
Accountant (licensed)
and so on.

I have personally met DOs who were in:

anesthesiology
vascular surgery
pediatric oncology
oncolgy
radiology
family practice
pathology
cardiothoracic surgery
dermatology
geriatrics
pediatrics
OB/GYN
 
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residentx2

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"Eh, whatever.....Everyone I speak to tells me not to even think about it. Go to medical school in the US...PERIOD!"

DO schools are medical schools and they are in the US.
 

CatsandCradles

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ocdp09 said:
Hey guys, Im a new user here and I had a question regarding DO's that maybe someone could answer. Im well aware of the process for a MD to become a specialist (like a surgeon, radiologist, etc.) but im not really sure of the DO's. I read that DO's can become specialists as well but is this realistic? Because, I mean your comepeting with MD's correct? or does that not make a difference. Anyway, does anybody know the whole process for a DO to become a specialist? Is it shorter or longer than an MD? Is it realistic that hospitals and residence will hire me at good hospitals? If someone can help thanks!
Try using your phone book.

I come from a fairly tiny town - and we have 3 DOs listed, one is an ophthalmologist, another a ENT, and one is a GP. So there's a variety.

I shadowed the ENT who had the last name "Clearville" ~ well wouldn't it have been funny if she had been the ophthalmologist instead of ENT.

...get it? "Clear view" :)
 

amathew

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CatsandCradles said:
Try using your phone book.

I come from a fairly tiny town - and we have 3 DOs listed, one is an ophthalmologist, another a ENT, and one is a GP. So there's a variety.

I shadowed the ENT who had the last name "Clearville" ~ well wouldn't it have been funny if she had been the ophthalmologist instead of ENT.

...get it? "Clear view" :)
DO's are just as capable to get residencies in any field as MD's. The only difference is that since DO schools tend to focus more on manipulative medicine, most DO's tend to go into a practice that they could use that in...such as pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine and so on...but other than that, there is really no difference between the opportunities available for a DO med student applying for a certain specialty vs an MD student....from there, it really depends on the student.
 

DrFeelgoodMD

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amathew said:
DO's are just as capable to get residencies in any field as MD's. The only difference is that since DO schools tend to focus more on manipulative medicine, most DO's tend to go into a practice that they could use that in...such as pediatrics, family practice, internal medicine and so on...but other than that, there is really no difference between the opportunities available for a DO med student applying for a certain specialty vs an MD student....from there, it really depends on the student.
So you are saying that its not any harder for a DO to specialize over an MD?
 

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hoberto said:
specialties you cannot do with your DO training and residency.

Let's see....

Podiatry
Dentistry
Nurse
Physician's Assistant
Nurse Anesthetist
Psychologist
Social Work (licensed)
Accountant (licensed)
and so on.
Whattt? I can't specialize as an accountant? that's it! no one ever told me this I am rescinding my DO acceptance

:p
 

DrFeelgoodMD

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hoberto said:
I have personally met DOs who were in:

anesthesiology
vascular surgery
pediatric oncology
oncolgy
radiology
family practice
pathology
cardiothoracic surgery
dermatology
geriatrics
pediatrics
OB/GYN
Any in ophthalmology? :oops:
 

It'sElectric

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ocdp09 said:
Hey guys, Im a new user here and I had a question regarding DO's that maybe someone could answer. Im well aware of the process for a MD to become a specialist (like a surgeon, radiologist, etc.) but im not really sure of the DO's. I read that DO's can become specialists as well but is this realistic? Because, I mean your comepeting with MD's correct? or does that not make a difference. Anyway, does anybody know the whole process for a DO to become a specialist? Is it shorter or longer than an MD? Is it realistic that hospitals and residence will hire me at good hospitals? If someone can help thanks!
This is really getting old. Honestly, when will people at least take the time to read the FAQs, or at the very least do the tiniest bit of research. It doesn't even require you to sift through previous threads using the search function.

It is threads like these that have kept me away from SDN more and more. If you have to ask a question for all of the most basic of questions when the answer is literally right in front of your face, then all I can say to you is best of luck.

I'm probably coming off as a d1ck, but this (like I already said) is getting old.
 

Hoberto

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UVMTrifecta said:
Any in ophthalmology? :oops:

Not that I personally have met and known they were a DO. Now there is a very high probability that I have met a DO opthamalogist but did not know they were a DO.

You can easily find DOs in any given specialty by searching the staff directory of your favorite hospital's website. For instance, at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, I found the following guy in less than one minute. Admittedly, I am very familiar with their website so it might take a little bit longer if you have to first figure out where everything is located.

CCF Opthamology Dept. Website said:

Gregory S. Kosmorsky, D.O.
Neuro-Ophthalmology and Comprehensive Ophthalmology departments

Dr. Kosmorsky was the director of the neuro-ophthalmology unit at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation for 14 years before going into private practice, but returned to the Cole Eye Institute in 2002. Board-certified in ophthalmology and neurology, Dr. Kosmorsky earned his medical degree from The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Pennsylvania. He completed a residency in adult neurology at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, and a residency in ophthalmology at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He completed a fellowship in neuro-ophthalmology at Washington University Medical Center in St. Louis, Mo.

He is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Academy of Neurology, the American Medical Association, the Cleveland Opthamological Society and the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society. Dr. Kosmorsky has been involved in numerous research grants and is a national and international lecturer. He has published more than 70 peer-reviewed original papers.

His specialty interests are ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, neurology, cataracts and laser vision correction.
 

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medhacker said:
Whattt? I can't specialize as an accountant? that's it! no one ever told me this I am rescinding my DO acceptance

:p
You also can't specialize in marine biology. I'm sorry. :(
 

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ocdp09 said:
Hey guys, Im a new user here and I had a question regarding DO's that maybe someone could answer. Im well aware of the process for a MD to become a specialist (like a surgeon, radiologist, etc.) but im not really sure of the DO's. I read that DO's can become specialists as well but is this realistic? Because, I mean your comepeting with MD's correct? or does that not make a difference. Anyway, does anybody know the whole process for a DO to become a specialist? Is it shorter or longer than an MD? Is it realistic that hospitals and residence will hire me at good hospitals? If someone can help thanks!
Since DO's can do MD residencies, everything is exactly the same. Some of the DO residencies may be a year longer due to internship year requirements, but if you don't like it, you can alway do an MD residency.
 

USArmyDoc

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residentx2 said:
"Eh, whatever.....Everyone I speak to tells me not to even think about it. Go to medical school in the US...PERIOD!"

DO schools are medical schools and they are in the US.
I know thank you for your explanation. I am going to a DO school. :rolleyes:
 

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PlasticMan said:
I know this may surprise some of you, but I actually know a DO plastic surgeon *GASP* :eek:


:rolleyes:

Yep, I know a DO who did his plastic surgery fellowship training at an unknown place called Mayo Clinic. (technically his training was called Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery Fellowship Program)

Now does a lot of breast reconstructive surgery (s/p mastectomy) but don't let his patients know he's a DO ... they might not believe he's a real doctor
 

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Buckeye(OH) said:
Honestly dude, did you even read the FAQs or search?

Yes. Its realistic.
Buckeye's always the first one to get all fired up. I love it. FAQ's, dude! FAQS!!!!
 

lala83

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as far as your question about DOs ending up at top hospitals in the country, I know that we have multiple at Duke Hospital. So yes, DO's rock.
 

group_theory

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Kevin Kelly, DO
Associate Professor of Medicine in Medical Oncology at Yale University School of Medicine
Med School: PCOM
Residency: Internal Medicine - Albert Einstein Medical Center
Fellowship: Medical Oncology - Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Joseph V. Portereiko, DO
Assistant Professor of Surgery, Section of Trauma, Surgical Critical Care and Surgical Emergencies of Yale University School of Medicine
Med School: NYCOM
Residency: Surgery - Brookdale Hospital
Fellowship: Surgical Critical Care - Yale New Haven Hospital


Hopefully this will show the original poster that it is possible to specialize as a DO (and in the future, a little good faith background research to avoid annoying certain chronic sleep-deprived haven't-seen-the-sun-in-days SDNers ... btw not referring to me)
 

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group_theory said:
Kevin Kelly, DO
Associate Professor of Medicine in Medical Oncology at Yale University School of Medicine
Med School: PCOM
Residency: Internal Medicine - Albert Einstein Medical Center
Fellowship: Medical Oncology - Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Joseph V. Portereiko, DO
Assistant Professor of Surgery, Section of Trauma, Surgical Critical Care and Surgical Emergencies of Yale University School of Medicine
Med School: NYCOM
Residency: Surgery - Brookdale Hospital
Fellowship: Surgical Critical Care - Yale New Haven Hospital


Hopefully this will show the original poster that it is possible to specialize as a DO (and in the future, a little good faith background research to avoid annoying certain chronic sleep-deprived haven't-seen-the-sun-in-days SDNers ... btw not referring to me)
Ohh My GOD!!!!! :thumbup: NYCOM Please accept me for 2007!!!!! YaY!!!! :luck:
 
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