super.ego

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Scored 455 today. *cries*

Too many research questions that I didn’t know answer to. I’m retaking it in two weeks. Hoping to cram whatever time I have left. I was clos.
I'm not sure if you'd find this helpful, but to me the test is more about isolating and selecting the most plausible answers than cramming material. Practically speaking, you shouldn't panic if you see a question with unfamiliar content. A large proportion of questions will be unfamiliar. Instead, look through the offered options and—using a combination of clinical, research, and intuitive knowledge you've gained throughout your training—select a response.
 
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psydstudent2020

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There are, how old are your editions? I have the brand new ones and will hopefully be done with them in a few weeks. I would sell them to you for a very reasonable price. That being said, if your materials aren't extremely old you will probably be fine.
I got them in 2017. I’ll just be starting internship this fall so I probably won’t be taking it for two or three years. But thank you for offering! :)
 
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psydstudent2020

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I know it depends on each state for when you should take the EPPP but what about those who take an extra year after internship to finish dissertation or other reasons? I may be in that situation and feel it would be a good time to take it.
 

proudvegan

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I'm not sure if you'd find this helpful, but to me the test is more about isolating and selecting the most plausible answers than cramming material. Practically speaking, you shouldn't panic if you see a question with unfamiliar content. A large proportion of questions will be unfamiliar. Instead, look through the offered options and—using a combination of clinical, research, and intuitive knowledge you've gained throughout your training—select a response.
You're right. I have been able to eliminate to two answers. However, with the topic(s) that are unfamiliar, most of it is wording and trying to understand which concept or theory it is referring to. Vocabulary is one thing. I have to keep reading because it is the only thing that will stick. If i know or understand the material and research, i may be able to answer the questions. I have gotten better with eliminating so that is a good thing.
 
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This has been my favorite forum as I prepped for the EPPP. I passed yesterday with a pretty high score (90 NY). May have overdone it, but didn't want to under do it. Started AATBS practice tests in the low 50%. Study areas I missed and general study, listened to tapes, googled answers I didn't know, and made a list of stuff I wasn't getting. After about a month test scores went up to mid 60's, Did more of the same for another month and reviewed the list of stuff I wasn't getting, and eventually scores went up again to mid 70's / low 80's. Took 7 of the 8 AATBS test twice and looked at questions from other older courses and quizlet. I have dyslexia which was a curse and a blessing as my auditory memory is pretty good, but would sometimes misread words in a question or an answer.

Not an easy test and felt like a gave a decent answers for most questions and some I just didn't have any idea. But like I read on here a lot, if you put in the time and study the way you know you learn you can do it. .I continued make progress about every 3 or 4 practice tests moving from 50's to 60's to 70's on the practice tests. Sending all who are read this my best wishes and encouragement.
Just curious, how did you take the AATBS tests twice w/o seeing the answers on the second time?
 
Dec 27, 2017
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Passed with 627. Was scoring in high 60’s to low 70’s on AATBS practice tests, passed both PEPPO tests (one in person and one online). So glad that’s over.

Selling my 2018 AATBS study materials if anyone is interested.
 
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forcefive17

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Passed with a 545 and used AATBS audio/written, practice exams and psych prep audios that were hand me downs. All-in-all, found psych prep audios to be the most useful. Practice tests were as follows: 54, 57, 60, 62, 59, 64, 70, 77. I studied for about 3 months, but not very seriously. Began studying seriously three weeks before and did just fine.
 
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Gully376

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Passed with a 615. Definitely a beast of a process and not easy to focus and study that long. I think everyone needs to find what works for them studying-wise but I will say I was getting high 60s on practice exams and only passed one (70 on the last practice I took). I took the in-person PEPPP which I found helpful but my score on the actual exam was significantly higher than I had been scoring on the practice exams. Good luck everyone!
 
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Passed with a 545 and used AATBS audio/written, practice exams and psych prep audios that were hand me downs. All-in-all, found psych prep audios to be the most useful. Practice tests were as follows: 54, 57, 60, 62, 59, 64, 70, 77. I studied for about 3 months, but not very seriously. Began studying seriously three weeks before and did just fine.
I just took the test Friday and missed by 24 points. There was a lot of information on community services and telemed. I’m using the 2017 study materials any suggestions?
 

foreverbull

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I just took the test Friday and missed by 24 points. There was a lot of information on community services and telemed. I’m using the 2017 study materials any suggestions?
Bummer! Sorry to hear it. If there are particular subject areas that you think you struggled with (and can recall them from the test), try looking at current research/theory in those areas...couldn’t hurt to briefly familiarize yourself with them. Generally I think folks say that it’s important to not only have a good knowledge base from studying but test-taking strategies (choosing the best possible answer even if none seem completely correct; using what you do know to extrapolate to areas you don’t as well).

Your materials seem recent enough....how about practice tests? Were you taking them regularly to study?

I might suggest taking the PEPPPO to better see where you’re struggling as well. And rule out any role anxiety might be playing.

Those are just thoughts off-hand, but feel free to share your study methods/materials used if you want more suggestions from folks about preparing.
 
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So I am using AATBS, and I just bought the diagnostic exam. I scored 72% on it but all of the testmaster exams have been in the 60s...wondering why this might be? Are these supposed to be more challenging?
 
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forcefive17

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So I am using AATBS, and I just bought the diagnostic exam. I scored 72% on it but all of the testmaster exams have been in the 60s...wondering why this might be? Are these supposed to be more challenging?
It sounds to me like you're ready to take your exam. We all found the assessment exam to be difficult at first (generally scoring between 30-40% lower than final exams), What my colleagues and I found was that the exam 1-3 tend to be easier, 4-6 tend to increase in difficult substantially, and 7-8 were easiest and more reflective of exam difficulty (not always content, though).
 
May 4, 2019
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1
Bummer! Sorry to hear it. If there are particular subject areas that you think you struggled with (and can recall them from the test), try looking at current research/theory in those areas...couldn’t hurt to briefly familiarize yourself with them. Generally I think folks say that it’s important to not only have a good knowledge base from studying but test-taking strategies (choosing the best possible answer even if none seem completely correct; using what you do know to extrapolate to areas you don’t as well).

Your materials seem recent enough....how about practice tests? Were you taking them regularly to study?

I might suggest taking the PEPPPO to better see where you’re struggling as well. And rule out any role anxiety might be playing.

Those are just thoughts off-hand, but feel free to share your study methods/materials used if you want more suggestions from folks about preparing.
Thank you! i read quite a few articles from the APA website that appeared to be very relevant and would have been helpful to have read previously. I was regularly taking practice tests. I am historically a horrible test taker... i would much rather write a paper. I will probably try the PEPPPO too, I do not feel like the AATBS accurately reflects the current EPPP.
 

LadyHalcyon

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I studied with aatbs materials and passed
Thank you! i read quite a few articles from the APA website that appeared to be very relevant and would have been helpful to have read previously. I was regularly taking practice tests. I am historically a horrible test taker... i would much rather write a paper. I will probably try the PEPPPO too, I do not feel like the AATBS accurately reflects the current EPPP.
 
May 16, 2019
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1
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Hi all.

I write my exam tomorrow. Like many previous posters, I did ATTBS books, quizzes, tests, flash cards, etc. I haven't gotten high scores on the ATTBS tests even though I did all 8 and the assessment one (highest was 71%) and there's not really a consistent pattern of which areas I am weaker or stronger on. Seems like one goes up and the others go down randomly. I did the PEPPPO and PEPPPO2 tests and passed both but these have no "scores" associated with them.

Does anyone have any last minute tips of what to prepare the day before that was helpful for them? Or perhaps words of reassurance.

Fingers crossed.
 

LadyHalcyon

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Start talking like you will pass the test. I spent a good deal of time the last day or two before the test retraining my brain (e.g. correcting my language from "if I pass" to "when I pass" during conversations; lots of positive self-talk etc.)

Test-taking strategies are SUPER important for this test imo. I really liked the strike-out feature for several reasons: it made me carefully read ALL the answers to each question, it was methodical (which reduced my anxiety), and it saved time in terms of reviewing the questions I had flagged. Additionally, I also liked the highlighting tool. I used it for highlighting important words in both the questions and the answers; it also helped me to slow down, which is one of my biggest problems with long tests.... actually all tests. I'm that person that always finishes tests way too early. Most of the time it's fine, but there have definitely been times where I have made careless mistakes.

Don't think the test is trying to trick you by giving you an answer that is too easy. Go with your first response, unless you have a solid rationale for changing it. If the test question uses qualifying words or phrases like, "Recent research on suicide contradicts prior beliefs that......," don't choose a response with an absolute term (all, never, always). Actually, be very careful with absolutes in general, especially when it comes to ethics (except the sex stuff). I found it helpful to first look at the question, think about all the information I knew about the topic, and then look at the answers. There will rarely be a question where you can't at least narrow it down to two choices, which gives you a 50% chance of guessing correctly! Also, don't flag too many questions. Make sure to answer all of questions the first go-around and, if you have time, carefully review the first 25ish questions after you are finished. All the flagged questions I did end up changing occurred during the beginning of the exam; not surprising due to my high levels of anxiety! I also took two bathroom breaks as a way to manage stress and fatigue. Furthermore, every time I saw a question that felt like it was coming from left-field I simply told myself it was one of "those fake trial questions" and moved right along. The bathroom breaks helped, especially the first one, which I took after about 30 min of testing. Thankfully, the test seemed to magically become easier after that first bathroom break!

This may sound horrible, and it's possible I'm just a horrible person, but I just kept telling myself, "I know so many psychologists that are complete idiots and they passed, so there should be no reason I can't pass too. "
Hi all.

I write my exam tomorrow. Like many previous posters, I did ATTBS books, quizzes, tests, flash cards, etc. I haven't gotten high scores on the ATTBS tests even though I did all 8 and the assessment one (highest was 71%) and there's not really a consistent pattern of which areas I am weaker or stronger on. Seems like one goes up and the others go down randomly. I did the PEPPPO and PEPPPO2 tests and passed both but these have no "scores" associated with them.

Does anyone have any last minute tips of what to prepare the day before that was helpful for them? Or perhaps words of reassurance.

Fingers crossed.
 
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May 16, 2019
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Start talking like you will pass the test. I spent a good deal of time the last day or two before the test retraining my brain (e.g. correcting my language from "if I pass" to "when I pass" during conversations; lots of positive self-talk etc.)

Test-taking strategies are SUPER important for this test imo. I really liked the strike-out feature for several reasons: it made me carefully read ALL the answers to each question, it was methodical (which reduced my anxiety), and it saved time in terms of reviewing the questions I had flagged. Additionally, I also liked the highlighting tool. I used it for highlighting important words in both the questions and the answers; it also helped me to slow down, which is one of my biggest problems with long tests.... actually all tests. I'm that person that always finishes tests way too early. Most of the time it's fine, but there have definitely been times where I have made careless mistakes.

Don't think the test is trying to trick you by giving you an answer that is too easy. Go with your first response, unless you have a solid rationale for changing it. If the test question uses qualifying words or phrases like, "Recent research on suicide contradicts prior beliefs that......," don't choose a response with an absolute term (all, never, always). Actually, be very careful with absolutes in general, especially when it comes to ethics (except the sex stuff). I found it helpful to first look at the question, think about all the information I knew about the topic, and then look at the answers. There will rarely be a question where you can't at least narrow it down to two choices, which gives you a 50% chance of guessing correctly! Also, don't flag too many questions. Make sure to answer all of questions the first go-around and, if you have time, carefully review the first 25ish questions after you are finished. All the flagged questions I did end up changing occurred during the beginning of the exam; not surprising due to my high levels of anxiety! I also took two bathroom breaks as a way to manage stress and fatigue. Furthermore, every time I saw a question that felt like it was coming from left-field I simply told myself it was one of "those fake trial questions" and moved right along. The bathroom breaks helped, especially the first one, which I took after about 30 min of testing. Thankfully, the test seemed to magically become easier after that first bathroom break!

This may sound horrible, and it's possible I'm just a horrible person, but I just kept telling myself, "I know so many psychologists that are complete idiots and they passed, so there should be no reason I can't pass too. "
UPDATE: I passed! So glad I never have to do this again. I found that really going through the questions was more time consuming than when I did the practice exams. If I were to do it again, I would have tried to move through the first half more quickly as I think I spent too long reasoning out the first half of the questions before I felt like time was running down.
 

foreverbull

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Thank you! i read quite a few articles from the APA website that appeared to be very relevant and would have been helpful to have read previously. I was regularly taking practice tests. I am historically a horrible test taker... i would much rather write a paper. I will probably try the PEPPPO too, I do not feel like the AATBS accurately reflects the current EPPP.
The PEPPPO will be worded most similarly to the EPPP, so some folks find it helpful to take and then see how they do on each subject area (I think you get to see a percentage of how well you do on each content area). If you have anxiety, make sure you keep it in check with CBT strategies (breathing, self-talk/challenging). And then use whatever strategies you see in thread. Many folks shared their insights for what helps in terms of test-taking strategies. For folks who failed multiple times, some went for different practice materials. But if the root is anxiety, that probably won't be as helpful.
Best of luck!
 

proudvegan

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Do you guys find that the psychprep or the aatbs were more similar to the questions on the EPPP exams? As far as "recent research," is it important to read APA articles?
 

proudvegan

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UPDATE: I passed! So glad I never have to do this again. I found that really going through the questions was more time consuming than when I did the practice exams. If I were to do it again, I would have tried to move through the first half more quickly as I think I spent too long reasoning out the first half of the questions before I felt like time was running down.
Congratulations!!!
 
May 30, 2019
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Hi all,

Long-time lurker of this forum, first time poster. Looking for some practical guidance...and maybe just some confirmation that I am on the "right" track...

I took the EPPP yesterday and, unfortunately, it did not go as planned. I felt prepared going in, yet, I scored a...490...ahhhhh, SO close. At first, I thought to myself, "WOW, I would have rather just bombed the damn thing." However, after some reflection and time to process everything, I am actually "relieved" that I am not far off and can pass this thing with some additional tweaks and work on test-taking strategies. I flagged about 85 items yesterday to review after I had gone through every question. Looking back this was too many questions to review since fatigue was setting in. I also changed a couple answers and I feel maybe this where I missed out on those oh so crucial 10 points.

I primarily used the AATBS books as well a practice exams. Last exam I scored a 72 and I also passed the online PEPPO..further indications that I am close. I plan on taking the test again within 3-4 weeks. My questions for all of you is: 1) Where should my focus be? 2) Should I try to gain some additional materials? I know a colleague that may have the PsychPrep audio CDs that I can borrow. From what I read these have been helpful for others. Should I spend some time listening to those? I also think it will be a good idea to focus on some more practice tests. 3) Is it worth it to invest in some more from lets say Academic Review or PsychPrep?

Any suggestions are welcomed and appreciated. Yesterday was rough, but I feel like I am really close! I will pass this monster one way or another!

Thanks for your time!
 

foreverbull

2+ Year Member
Sep 8, 2015
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Do you guys find that the psychprep or the aatbs were more similar to the questions on the EPPP exams? As far as "recent research," is it important to read APA articles?
I can't speak to the first part, but do you mean APA journal articles specifically vs. non APA journals? I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

If you did read APA articles, what domain would you focus on? That's tricky. You need to be familiar with a generally large body of research in multiple domains, which is why reviewing the practice materials and having familiarity with research summarized in the study materials should be adequate preparation, generally speaking, unless your materials are really old. If you know what domain you struggle the most with, then perhaps.
 

foreverbull

2+ Year Member
Sep 8, 2015
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Hi all,

Long-time lurker of this forum, first time poster. Looking for some practical guidance...and maybe just some confirmation that I am on the "right" track...

I took the EPPP yesterday and, unfortunately, it did not go as planned. I felt prepared going in, yet, I scored a...490...ahhhhh, SO close. At first, I thought to myself, "WOW, I would have rather just bombed the damn thing." However, after some reflection and time to process everything, I am actually "relieved" that I am not far off and can pass this thing with some additional tweaks and work on test-taking strategies. I flagged about 85 items yesterday to review after I had gone through every question. Looking back this was too many questions to review since fatigue was setting in. I also changed a couple answers and I feel maybe this where I missed out on those oh so crucial 10 points.

I primarily used the AATBS books as well a practice exams. Last exam I scored a 72 and I also passed the online PEPPO..further indications that I am close. I plan on taking the test again within 3-4 weeks. My questions for all of you is: 1) Where should my focus be? 2) Should I try to gain some additional materials? I know a colleague that may have the PsychPrep audio CDs that I can borrow. From what I read these have been helpful for others. Should I spend some time listening to those? I also think it will be a good idea to focus on some more practice tests. 3) Is it worth it to invest in some more from lets say Academic Review or PsychPrep?

Any suggestions are welcomed and appreciated. Yesterday was rough, but I feel like I am really close! I will pass this monster one way or another!

Thanks for your time!
Bummer, how frustrating!

1) If you passed the PEPPO, you must have a good grasp of the domains, generally speaking. Flagging 85 out of 225 questions is way too many, though, given the time limitations. Only flag the toughest of the tough and do your best to not flag too many. If you're overthinking and second-guessing, it will probably hurt you, so perhaps you might want to shift your test strategies a bit to only flagging like 20-40 at most.

2) I found the audio cds to be REALLY helpful. Yes, by all means, borrow them and listen! They're a great way to not have to put too much energy into studying while getting a really solid review. Dr. Jablon also asks test questions in the audio cds, if I remember correctly.

3) If you're THIS close to passing, I wouldn't suggest buying more materials. If you missed the mark more cleanly, then I'd say, perhaps. See if you can get a hold of some hand-me-down practice tests for further review. Some folks in here have access to some, so ask around here? Also, you might want to look at this: EPPP Initial Guide© (should be a free packet of materials, but I can't speak to its content as I'm not affiliated with the author).
 

megz927

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Just passed the EPPP (first try) with a 570. Finished test in 2 hours, and did not look back/change answers. I studied for 3 months about ~15 hours a week using PsychPrep audio (while jogging) and taking practice tests from PsychPrep and AATBS. I made sure to read the rationale for why I got answers wrong while taking the practice tests.

Study Materials:
- PsychPrep audio
** did not read any written materials
- PsychPrep online tests (all tests and quizzes)
- AATBS online tests (Exam #'s 1-7)


My practice tests scores were:
- PsychPrep:
Study Mode: 60-74%
Retake Mode: 83-89%
Test Mode: 78/91-92%
** Test E (Test Mode) first time at 78% (the week of the exam)

- AATBS:
64%, 65%, 72%, 66%, 68%, 63%, and 68%


Hope this helps! And good luck!
 

super.ego

Psychologist
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Mar 11, 2017
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Hi all,

Long-time lurker of this forum, first time poster. Looking for some practical guidance...and maybe just some confirmation that I am on the "right" track...

I took the EPPP yesterday and, unfortunately, it did not go as planned. I felt prepared going in, yet, I scored a...490...ahhhhh, SO close. At first, I thought to myself, "WOW, I would have rather just bombed the damn thing." However, after some reflection and time to process everything, I am actually "relieved" that I am not far off and can pass this thing with some additional tweaks and work on test-taking strategies. I flagged about 85 items yesterday to review after I had gone through every question. Looking back this was too many questions to review since fatigue was setting in. I also changed a couple answers and I feel maybe this where I missed out on those oh so crucial 10 points.

I primarily used the AATBS books as well a practice exams. Last exam I scored a 72 and I also passed the online PEPPO..further indications that I am close. I plan on taking the test again within 3-4 weeks. My questions for all of you is: 1) Where should my focus be? 2) Should I try to gain some additional materials? I know a colleague that may have the PsychPrep audio CDs that I can borrow. From what I read these have been helpful for others. Should I spend some time listening to those? I also think it will be a good idea to focus on some more practice tests. 3) Is it worth it to invest in some more from lets say Academic Review or PsychPrep?

Any suggestions are welcomed and appreciated. Yesterday was rough, but I feel like I am really close! I will pass this monster one way or another!

Thanks for your time!

Keep taking practice tests and reviewing answer rationales. Don't lose the momentum. You're almost there!
 

ClinPsychFan

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So...yeah, I'm taking the EPPP. I've been studying about 5-6 weeks, trying to do a section or two a week. I'm wondering how far out people waited to schedule the test. I've been feeling like I don't want to schedule until I feel confident or have adequate practice test scores, but then that might mean I'll never schedule the dang thing (and I am not in the financial position to take the test more than once). Anyone on here wait until they met certain study expectations/test scores to schedule? Or did you just go for it?
 

szymk1sm

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So...yeah, I'm taking the EPPP. I've been studying about 5-6 weeks, trying to do a section or two a week. I'm wondering how far out people waited to schedule the test. I've been feeling like I don't want to schedule until I feel confident or have adequate practice test scores, but then that might mean I'll never schedule the dang thing (and I am not in the financial position to take the test more than once). Anyone on here wait until they met certain study expectations/test scores to schedule? Or did you just go for it?
After finally getting my provisional license within my state, I scheduled the EPPP about 2 months out. I personally feel this was too long of an interval (I've been loosely studying since Jan 1). I started heavily studying at the end of April and by mid-May I was worn out (and getting 72%+ on all of my practice exams). I took a week off and am back to crunch mode - take the test in 3 weeks. Soo not sure if that answered your question :)

I personally felt that scheduling the exam gave me enough anxiety to seriously study; however, I would consider the amount of time you may need - 8 weeks has been way too much time for me and I just want to get it over (and feel pretty confident in my ability to pass). Guess we'll see what happens in 3 weeks.

My thought process at the time of scheduling was study for 1 month and if I need to reschedule for whatever reason, then I've given myself enough time to do so.
 

LadyHalcyon

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Go ahead and schedule it. If you can take a week off of work I say schedule it for one month for today and be done with it
So...yeah, I'm taking the EPPP. I've been studying about 5-6 weeks, trying to do a section or two a week. I'm wondering how far out people waited to schedule the test. I've been feeling like I don't want to schedule until I feel confident or have adequate practice test scores, but then that might mean I'll never schedule the dang thing (and I am not in the financial position to take the test more than once). Anyone on here wait until they met certain study expectations/test scores to schedule? Or did you just go for it?
 

foreverbull

2+ Year Member
Sep 8, 2015
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So...yeah, I'm taking the EPPP. I've been studying about 5-6 weeks, trying to do a section or two a week. I'm wondering how far out people waited to schedule the test. I've been feeling like I don't want to schedule until I feel confident or have adequate practice test scores, but then that might mean I'll never schedule the dang thing (and I am not in the financial position to take the test more than once). Anyone on here wait until they met certain study expectations/test scores to schedule? Or did you just go for it?
I scheduled it two months out when I took it a few years ago. Just bit the bullet and scheduled it, then hit the materials pretty hard 10-12 hours/week for 8 weeks. Your study hours will vary by your comfort level with the material; I felt fully ready at ~90 hours, but some people feel ready at 20-30 (I was told that a rule of thumb is ~100 hours, but clearly it varies widely). I’ve never heard of anyone meeting benchmarks before scheduling it out, although I once heard an extreme example of someone who studied for 8 months or so before taking it, so perhaps that person scheduled it once confident? But that seems to be the exception rather than the rule. Usually people need to schedule it to boost the motivation to study.
 
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Jun 4, 2019
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Hi Everyone,

Just wanted to pass my experiences forward incase it could be useful to anyone, as I found these forums helpful while studying for the EPPP. I took the EPPP in early May 2019 while 8 months pregnant and passed with a 620. Very relieved to have it done! I studied for about 3-4 months (had to take a brief pause from studying in my first trimester), about 10-15 hours per week and 20 hours per week for the last 2 weeks. It was hard work but it can be done, I just really wanted to get the exam done before arrival of baby. I used a combination of hand me down Psychprep and Academic Review materials (readings and practice exams). In my experience, I found the academic review materials (readings and practice exams) somewhat more helpful for the actual EPPP than Psychprep due to the greater depth of detail. Overall, the exam was challenging but doable. On the test version I received, some questions were fairly straightforward with recognizable content, but I found most items were not related (at least not directly) to content I studied and I had to use a process of elimination/logic and strategy to select a response. I memorized a lot of information from the study materials that was not asked about on the EPPP, which is frustrating, but I supposed you cannot predict what will actually be asked so it is important to be familiar with information in all domains. I likely overstudied to some extent, I may not have needed to memorize terms/concepts as much as I did. In general though, I believe it is important to study well, as it trains you to get through the exam, taking several practice exams is crucial in this regard.

Scores on practice exams:

-Psychprep: ranged from 58-70% (first pass) and by the time I did Exam E I scored 77% (did exam E in one sitting to work on timing/pacing for the real thing)
-Academic Review (2014 versions): I did 3-4 AR exams and scored mostly in the low 60s
-Retired Items Exam (did this towards the end): 78%.... I found the retired items exam gave somewhat of a better sense for the actual EPPP, particularly for how to tackle questions with content you haven't seen before. Did not take the PEPPO so cannot speak to that

Just my two cents, hope this was helpful. Good luck to all those studying, you can totally do it!! And once its done, never look back!!
 
Dec 5, 2015
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For people who have taken the PEPPPO exams....

1) Did you get a breakdown of your scores? and an actual total score? All it shows me in the portal is a pass/fail and a numberless bar graph

2) Did your scores line up with your EPPP scores? The PEPPPO test felt way too easy compared to my AATBS materials.
 

super.ego

Psychologist
2+ Year Member
Mar 11, 2017
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For people who have taken the PEPPPO exams....

1) Did you get a breakdown of your scores? and an actual total score? All it shows me in the portal is a pass/fail and a numberless bar graph

2) Did your scores line up with your EPPP scores? The PEPPPO test felt way too easy compared to my AATBS materials.
1) No breakdown or score, only what you described.

2) The PEPPPO felt very similar to the actual test. And the actual test, imo, was significantly less difficult than AATBS tests (while the EPPP questions were difficult, the responses were easier to sort through and narrow down).

I used AATBS tests and the PPPO and scored a 688 on the actual exam.
 
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chuckdanger

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Apr 1, 2008
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1) No breakdown or score, only what you described.

2) The PEPPPO felt very similar to the actual test. And the actual test, imo, was significantly less difficult than AATBS tests (while the EPPP questions were difficult, the responses were easier to sort through and narrow down).

I used AATBS tests and the PPPO and scored a 688 on the actual exam.
Second this. I'm glad I got used to the interface before the actual test as this helped to ease my nerves a bit before walking into it. And the content was easier than AATBS, if maybe a bit clunkier in terms of word-choice on the PEPPO/actual test so just needed to review an extra time or two for some questions to figure out what they were getting at.

Also just to overview my experience: Took the test 8 months after finishing internship. Studied intensively (3-4hrs/day; skipping a few days here and there) for 1 month. Used primarily Psych Prep audio files (2010 version I believe), occasionally by taking long drives to places I wanted to visit so I was a captive audience, and AATBS/Academic Review practice tests that were a bit older (2010 versions maybe? Still had DSM-IV-TR questions; my view is that AATBS>AR). Was scoring mid-50's for the first few tests, then mid-60's after having listened to the audio files 1x through, then finally above 70 after my second pass of the audio content and additional readings. Took the PEPPO with 2 weeks before my test and passed; which was a bit disappointing because it meant I had to continue to review content for 2 more weeks instead of just testing and hoping for the best. Used the Pocket prep app and final 2 AATBS practice tests after that, scored 76 and 80 on those. Scored a 655 on the exam, though felt unsure about how I was doing and flagged ~25 questions while using the last 20 mins to review all my responses. Ended up changing a few where I misread aspects of the questions/answers and feeling less pressed for time helped the obvious correct response stand out.
 
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Dec 5, 2015
77
43
61
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
1) No breakdown or score, only what you described.

2) The PEPPPO felt very similar to the actual test. And the actual test, imo, was significantly less difficult than AATBS tests (while the EPPP questions were difficult, the responses were easier to sort through and narrow down).

I used AATBS tests and the PPPO and scored a 688 on the actual exam.
This is very comforting to me lol because this is what I have been doing. thank you!
 
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