Goro's guide to DO school interviews

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Everything I've posted here applies, but a few additions are below.


Everything on the other post holds true, but you also need to show that you know something about Osteopathy. Please don’t simply parrot what you read on Wiki, there’s more to it than that. Those people who have shadowed DOs and compared and contrasted them to MDs will know what I mean.

You will need to articulate the reasons of “Why Osteopathy”, and “why our school”, because the curriculum will be pretty much the same wherever you go (but the delivery will be different).

Do NOT bash MDs. Some of your interviewers will be MDs, or married to them. If you’ve had poor experiences with allopathic medicine, that’s OK to discuss.

If you’ve seen OMM or OMT in action, that’s a plus.

If you’ve shadowed a DO, that’s a plus.

If you have a DO in the family, that’s a plus.

Be serious about this as your career choice. Don’t look back. If you really want to go to an MD school, well, go for an MD school.

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Everything I've posted here applies, but a few additions are below.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/goro’s-guide-to-interviews.1097033/#post-15658660

Everything on the other post holds true, but you also need to show that you know something about Osteopathy. Please don’t simply parrot what you read on Wiki, there’s more to it than that. Those people who have shadowed DOs and compared and contrasted them to MDs will know what I mean.

You will need to articulate the reasons of “Why Osteopathy”, and “why our school”, because the curriculum will be pretty much the same wherever you go (but the delivery will be different).

Do NOT bash MDs. Some of your interviewers will be MDs, or married to them. If you’ve had poor experiences with allopathic medicine, that’s OK to discuss.

If you’ve seen OMM or OMT in action, that’s a plus.

If you’ve shadowed a DO, that’s a plus.

If you have a DO in the family, that’s a plus.

Be serious about this as your career choice. Don’t look back. If you really want to go to an MD school, well, go for an MD school.
If I saw omm at another DO school should I mention it?

Would it look bad if I was interviewing at X school to say I visited y school and saw an OMM demonstration.
 
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If I saw omm at another DO school should I mention it?

Would it look bad if I was interviewing at X school to say I visited y school and saw an OMM demonstration.

When I was doing interviews, if I was interviewing you, as long as you managed to wax somewhat eloquently and succinctly about your experience it wouldn't be detrimental that your experience was not directly affiliated with our institution. Medicine is a pretty small world (and osteopathic medicine sometimes feels even smaller) so it is very possible that the DO you shadowed may actually be an old friend from medical school, a professor when I was a student, or someone I know from CME conferences etc.
 
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I do not have family member of DO. But everything else applies my situation. GORO you are always the best SDN member to me. Thank you so much
 
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Yes

If I saw omm at another DO school should I mention it?


No; we take it for granted that you'll be applying elsewhere, and don't take it personally.
Would it look bad if I was interviewing at X school to say I visited y school and saw an OMM demonstration.
 
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Any tips for MMI's? I know the general advice is "be yourself", but I am a little nervous.
 
Any tips for MMI's? I know the general advice is "be yourself", but I am a little nervous.
Best advice is don't be yourself. Put up the super professional/ethical charade up. Don't say anything that could be called questionable. If they ask something dumb like "your wife ran a red light would you report her to the police?" Just say yes. I'm not kidding. 100% of people that I've seen rejected from MMI interviews said something reasonable to unreasonable answers seeking uptight people.
 
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Best advice is don't be yourself. Put up the super professional/ethical charade up. Don't say anything that could be called questionable. If they ask something dumb like "your wife ran a red light would you report her to the police?" Just say yes. I'm not kidding. 100% of people that I've seen rejected from MMI interviews said something reasonable to unreasonable answers seeking uptight people.

I don't understand what you're trying to say here.
 
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Best advice is don't be yourself. Put up the super professional/ethical charade up. Don't say anything that could be called questionable. If they ask something dumb like "your wife ran a red light would you report her to the police?" Just say yes. I'm not kidding. 100% of people that I've seen rejected from MMI interviews said something reasonable to unreasonable answers seeking uptight people.

sorry but I disagree lol... being yourself is always what you need to be (even if that brings a possible rejection).
 
I don't understand what you're trying to say here.

I think he is saying be politically correct.

His example about reporting your wife for running a red life showed that.

Of course you wouldn't report her but you have to say you would since it what you should do.
 
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sorry but I disagree lol... being yourself is always what you need to be (even if that brings a possible rejection).

There is a thing as being too honest. Don't share any extreme views you have.
 
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Any tips for MMI's? I know the general advice is "be yourself", but I am a little nervous.

Advice I gave to someone else for an MMI

Actually what I suggest is to google MMIs and try to see if there are example scenarios that you can do. Don't try to memorize the scenario or the right answer because your MUCOM MMI scenarios will be something you have never seen before. Treat these example scenarios like the MCAT, where you are handling a new passage or new scenario. The whole point is too see how you would approach a new situation . Give yourself 1-2 minutes to read the scenario and then 6-8 minutes to answer it. You want to be able to assess the different sides of the issue and then give an answer.

If it is any consolation, at one of the stations, one interviewer said I had the best answer he had seen so far (he had seen 12 people). So I definitely think it helped me.
 
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There is a thing as being too honest. Don't share any extreme views you have.

Concur strongly with this advice. The schools weed out the ones that have extreme views on a scenario.
 
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sorry but I disagree lol... being yourself is always what you need to be (even if that brings a possible rejection).
If you follow this advice, don't expect to succeed.
 
So what you guys are trying to say is be natural, but tell them what they want to hear.
 
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I went through 5 different interviews, so I feel I can add my own perspective beyond the conventional wisdom of the legion of premeds who will probably be tacking on to this thread.

I can tell you that the large majority of interview questions are going to be gauging your interest and enthusiasm for medicine and osteopathic medicine, and the rest are used to try and get a measure of your personality and your character. If you have to fake an answer to the former, you shouldn't be doing this. As for the latter, I never got asked a question I felt obligated to be dishonest about. There could certainly be a question about something like Obamacare, but this question is usually to check and see if you are an intelligent human being with an opinion on an important topic in modern health care. If you are a bona fide Tea Party activist you may want to avoid telling the interviewer that it is the most egregious act of socialist, Un-Constitutional tyranny in American history, and instead explain what problems you have with it and why. I doubt you're going to get "Abortion, YES OR NO??" or some other kind of ethical question that really puts you on the spot. I'm sure you can find anecdotes on this board about it, but I never got asked a question where I was worried that I was being judged harshly for my answer. The people doing these interviews are typically faculty who are, in fact, real live human beings, and they want to see all the good and special things about you come out in that interview while making sure you also aren't a weirdo.

Please, PLEASE have a better answer to "Why DO?" than "I want to treat the whole person, not just the disease!" and "I believe in a holistic approach to medicine!" All of your DO school interviews will ask you this question. I had a group interview at one school and watched some poor folks totally sputter out on this after the first guy said exactly those things. The same goes for "Why this school?", as Goro said. If you can't go into specifics on why you love the school, you shouldn't consider attending. Do your homework.

Finally, the interviewer will ask you at the end if you have any questions. HAVE SOME. They will remember your interest and curiosity regarding their program when they are reviewing your file later.
 
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I went through 5 different interviews, so I feel I can add my own perspective beyond the conventional wisdom of the legion of premeds who will probably be tacking on to this thread.

I can tell you that the large majority of interview questions are going to be gauging your interest and enthusiasm for medicine and osteopathic medicine, and the rest are used to try and get a measure of your personality and your character. If you have to fake an answer to the former, you shouldn't be doing this. As for the latter, I never got asked a question I felt obligated to be dishonest about. There could certainly be a question about something like Obamacare, but this question is usually to check and see if you are an intelligent human being with an opinion on an important topic in modern health care. If you are a bona fide Tea Party activist you may want to avoid telling the interviewer that it is the most egregious act of socialist, Un-Constitutional tyranny in American history, and instead explain what problems you have with it and why. I doubt you're going to get "Abortion, YES OR NO??" or some other kind of ethical question that really puts you on the spot. I'm sure you can find anecdotes on this board about it, but I never got asked a question where I was worried that I was being judged harshly for my answer. The people doing these interviews are typically faculty who are, in fact, real live human beings, and they want to see all the good and special things about you come out in that interview while making sure you also aren't a weirdo.

Please, PLEASE have a better answer to "Why DO?" than "I want to treat the whole person, not just the disease!" and "I believe in a holistic approach to medicine!" All of your DO school interviews will ask you this question. I had a group interview at one school and watched some poor folks totally sputter out on this after the first guy said exactly those things. The same goes for "Why this school?", as Goro said. If you can't go into specifics on why you love the school, you shouldn't consider attending. Do your homework.

Finally, the interviewer will ask you at the end if you have any questions. HAVE SOME. They will remember your interest and curiosity regarding their program when they are reviewing your file later.
Good post. What about tying in personal/extracurricular experience with the "holistic approach" answer to the "why DO" question? Wouldn't that be satisfactory?
 
Please, PLEASE have a better answer to "Why DO?" than "I want to treat the whole person, not just the disease!" and "I believe in a holistic approach to medicine!" All of your DO school interviews will ask you this question. I had a group interview at one school and watched some poor folks totally sputter out on this after the first guy said exactly those things. The same goes for "Why this school?", as Goro said. If you can't go into specifics on why you love the school, you shouldn't consider attending. Do your homework.

I had one interview where the question never came up (n=1). However, excellent post none the less.
 
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sorry but I disagree lol... being yourself is always what you need to be (even if that brings a possible rejection).
You're welcome to do whatever you want. I'm just stating what will happen if you happen to be the type of person who wouldn't report his wife for running a red light.
 
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You're welcome to do whatever you want. I'm just stating what will happen if you happen to be the type of person who wouldn't report his wife for running a red light.
Your advice is dead on correct. You need to tell people what they want to hear and this holds true for many many aspects of life.
 
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You're welcome to do whatever you want. I'm just stating what will happen if you happen to be the type of person who wouldn't report his wife for running a red light.


I'd much much rather have the state mad at me than my wife...





...Hypothetically speaking ofcourse ;)
 
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Good post. What about tying in personal/extracurricular experience with the "holistic approach" answer to the "why DO" question? Wouldn't that be satisfactory?
I don't see why not. I'm not saying don't use those phrases at all, just don't think that they constitute an answer by themselves. You don't need to present a thesis, just understand the basics of Osteopathic medicine's history and have an answer for "Why DO?" that does not consist solely of buzzwords. For me, the focus on educating clinicians and teaching excellent patient interaction and communication skills were attractive, because that is the kind of doctor I want to be. They're looking for a person who has really thought through this whole "wanting to be a doctor" thing and is intelligent enough to explain it, and who is going to be a "fit" with their school (which unfortunately is a little less tangible and harder to prepare for). At an Osteopathic school, Osteopathic identity is important, and they will sniff you out quickly if you're solely using them as an MD back-up. That doesn't mean you won't get in if you are, it just means you have to be a good actor if you really don't care about Osteopathic medicine and just want the pathway to making that wheelbarrow full of doctor money.

I am by no means an expert on this stuff (n=10 if you add the experience of my 5 interviews and the 5 others I witnessed at my group interview) and I defer to Goro's expertise on all matters, but usually we all had a little meeting with a few people from the admissions department before the interview and they would give us a spiel on the type of applicant they're looking for, and these are the impressions I got from those experiences.
 
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Any tips for MMI's? I know the general advice is "be yourself", but I am a little nervous.
I've had a couple MMI's so far. There have not been any questions with clear black/white answers. I received ethical questions, but nothing like what has been talked about. The schools even stressed that there is no right answer, and they can tell when you're just trying to say what you think they want to hear. A big thing to remember though is to be receptive to a differing viewpoint. Your interviewer may play devil's advocate and say "But what about this?" It's good to be open to that suggestion and articulate why you do/do not agree with it. They're not looking for people who are not able to compromise or be open to another perspective.
 
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I've had a couple MMI's so far. There have not been any questions with clear black/white answers. I received ethical questions, but nothing like what has been talked about. The schools even stressed that there is no right answer, and they can tell when you're just trying to say what you think they want to hear. A big thing to remember though is to be receptive to a differing viewpoint. Your interviewer may play devil's advocate and say "But what about this?" It's good to be open to that suggestion and articulate why you do/do not agree with it. They're not looking for people who are not able to compromise or be open to another perspective.

Bolded parts are very important. Also, one should be able to discuss different or opposing sides of an issue.
 
Bolded parts are very important. Also, one should be able to discuss different or opposing sides of an issue.
This is great information, but I can also see where the other guys are coming from. ;)
 
This is great information, but I can also see where the other guys are coming from. ;)

Sorry meant to say if you approach an issue be able to discuss it from various view points. Ex. Why some would advocate for euthanasia? Why would some advocate against it? So you basically talk about both sides and where you stand on the issue and then why. You will be asked questions from the interviewer that gives another different view point from the one you stated. And you answer appropriately, making sure you acknowledge that viewpoint.
 
Sorry meant to say if you approach an issue be able to discuss it from various view points. Ex. Why some would advocate for euthanasia? Why would some advocate against it? So you basically talk about both sides and where you stand on the issue and then why. You will be asked questions from the interviewer that gives a different view point from the one you stated. And you answer appropriately, making sure you acknowledge that viewpoint.
That was sort of a weak attempt at giving an example of what you're saying. Like a joke, just not a good one.

I've not been on any medical school interviews yet, but have had some fairly high stakes conversations for employment etc. I understand what you guys are talking about, and agree.
 
Awesome as always Goro,

How long should we be shadowing a DO for?



Everything I've posted here applies, but a few additions are below.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/goro’s-guide-to-interviews.1097033/#post-15658660

Everything on the other post holds true, but you also need to show that you know something about Osteopathy. Please don’t simply parrot what you read on Wiki, there’s more to it than that. Those people who have shadowed DOs and compared and contrasted them to MDs will know what I mean.

You will need to articulate the reasons of “Why Osteopathy”, and “why our school”, because the curriculum will be pretty much the same wherever you go (but the delivery will be different).

Do NOT bash MDs. Some of your interviewers will be MDs, or married to them. If you’ve had poor experiences with allopathic medicine, that’s OK to discuss.

If you’ve seen OMM or OMT in action, that’s a plus.

If you’ve shadowed a DO, that’s a plus.

If you have a DO in the family, that’s a plus.

Be serious about this as your career choice. Don’t look back. If you really want to go to an MD school, well, go for an MD school.
 
Best advice is don't be yourself. Put up the super professional/ethical charade up. Don't say anything that could be called questionable. If they ask something dumb like "your wife ran a red light would you report her to the police?" Just say yes. I'm not kidding. 100% of people that I've seen rejected from MMI interviews said something reasonable to unreasonable answers seeking uptight people.

I'm not sure I understand this example question. Reporting her to the police might be the "right" thing to do but I feel like 99% of people would never report her. I would think the interviewer knows this and is seeing if you give them the answer you think they want, you know, by lying to them. I have heard of questions like this that are used to gauge how honest the interviewee is being during an interview.
 
In an ideal world, as long as you can. I've seen (and accepted) people who shadowed only for an afternoon with a clinician.

Awesome as always Goro,

How long should we be shadowing a DO for?

Concerning the "tell them what you want to hear" stuff above, this can go too far. Our BS detectors are pretty good. For example, if one goes on and on about the miracles of Osteopathy, but you live in a DO-rich area and never bothered to find a DO to shadow, and/or never had one treat you, you're in trouble. I've rejected people who lived 10 miles away but never bothered once to come by and check out the place they'd want to spend fours and >$250K at.

I do agree that there is such a thing as being too honest. Cost me a Faculty job.
 
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In an ideal world, as long as you can. I've seen (and accepted) people who shadowed only for an afternoon with a clinician.



Concerning the "tell them what you want to hear" stuff above, this can go too far. Our BS detectors are pretty good. For example, if one goes on and on about the miracles of Osteopathy, but you live in a DO-rich area and never bothered to find a DO to shadow, and/or never had one treat you, you're in trouble. I've rejected people who lived 10 miles away but never bothered once to come by and check out the place they'd want to spend fours and >$250K at.

I do agree that there is such a thing as being too honest. Cost me a Faculty job.

...
 
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I'm not sure I understand this example question. Reporting her to the police might be the "right" thing to do but I feel like 99% of people would never report her. I would think the interviewer knows this and is seeing if you give them the answer you think they want, you know, by lying to them. I have heard of questions like this that are used to gauge how honest the interviewee is being during an interview.
Well, being honest didn't work for one of my friends that got rejected as a legacy.
 
.

Well, being honest didn't work for one of my friends that got rejected as a legacy.

Legacy only takes u so far but I agree. Don't saying something stupid even if you believe it.

@Goro are questions about healthcare (aca) common. Do you think we should keep up on current events (Ebola). Should I be honest about my feeling toward healthcare or just say general stuff that no one disagrees with.

Thanks!!!
 
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@Goro, in addition to sending thank-you notes to your interviewers, should you send thank-yous to the admissions office/specific representatives who hosted the interview day? Or is that overkill? Thank you :)
 
Best advice is don't be yourself. Put up the super professional/ethical charade up. Don't say anything that could be called questionable. If they ask something dumb like "your wife ran a red light would you report her to the police?" Just say yes. I'm not kidding. 100% of people that I've seen rejected from MMI interviews said something reasonable to unreasonable answers seeking uptight people.

you know what, I wouldn't report either lol. Probably I read your quote without thinking. Forget about my previous reply.
 
The have enough things to worry about, so don't fill in their email inboxes.

@Goro, in addition to sending thank-you notes to your interviewers, should you send thank-yous to the admissions office/specific representatives who hosted the interview day? Or is that overkill? Thank you :)
 
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Did they tell your friend he was rejected specifically for the way he answered this question?
Now that's the type of skepticism I'd be using. While they didn't tell him specifically, the conversation grew over a group of us that had both acceptances and rejections at MMI. The common factor for rejections was a racy answer. For example, at my interview at Marian when they asked me something along the lines of "if you were to be asked by a homeless man for $5 money for food but suspect that he may use it on alcohol, what would you do?" I answered honestly. I said I'd give him the money anyway and it was his problem if he used it on alcohol. I'm not there to judge him and don't think $5 is going to make a real impact on his addiction or lack of.
 
why would they do that?
AlbinoHawk DOs friend was basing his/her rejection on the reply to the question so I was wondering if this was for sure why they were rejected or just the reason his friend thought he/she was rejected.

Just to be clear, I totally agree about not being too honest with some of these questions. However I think there is a point (like with the red light scenario) that the technically right ethical answer would be such an obvious lie we might be better off going the other way a bit.
 
I think an important point to remember is that honesty does not equal truth.
Often people confuse the two. Just because you're being honest about your opinion, doesn't make it a reasonable one. Maybe if you've ever had to defend yourself by saying, "Hey, I'm just being honest." or "I'm just saying what everyone else is thinking.", you should censor yourself, or at least think before you speak a little more.
 
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I think an important point to remember is that honesty does not equal truth.
Often people confuse the two. Just because you're being honest about your opinion, doesn't make it a reasonable one. Maybe if you've ever had to defend yourself by saying, "Hey, I'm just being honest." or "I'm just saying what everyone else is thinking.", you should censor yourself, or at least think before you speak a little more.

Agreed, just like if something is the right answer ethically speaking, that doesn't automatically make it a reasonable answer. That's all I'm trying to say. I cringed at the thought of someone using "Hey, I'm just being honest." or "I'm just saying what everyone else is thinking." during an interview, thanks for that.
 
Agreed, just like if something is the right answer ethically speaking, that doesn't automatically make it a reasonable answer. That's all I'm trying to say. I cringed at the thought of someone using "Hey, I'm just being honest." or "I'm just saying what everyone else is thinking." during an interview, thanks for that.
I feel the same way.
I've seen too many fine conversations or benign situations devolve into such messes just because someone couldn't communicate effectively or thoughtfully.
 
Too many people in general pretend to act all honest and ethical but behind the scenes they have incredibly crappy morals. Report your wife for running a red light.. I mean cmon who would really do that LOL.
 
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Too many people in general pretend to act all honest and ethical but behind the scenes they have incredibly crappy morals. Report your wife for running a red light.. I mean cmon who would really do that LOL.
Well, ethical and honest, may be more related than ethical and moral. Another thing to consider with this type of question is practicality.
Can you imagine calling the dispatcher when you told them the nature of your complaint?

http://replygif.net/1231

http://replygif.net/1249
 
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Now that's the type of skepticism I'd be using. While they didn't tell him specifically, the conversation grew over a group of us that had both acceptances and rejections at MMI. The common factor for rejections was a racy answer. For example, at my interview at Marian when they asked me something along the lines of "if you were to be asked by a homeless man for $5 money for food but suspect that he may use it on alcohol, what would you do?" I answered honestly. I said I'd give him the money anyway and it was his problem if he used it on alcohol. I'm not there to judge him and don't think $5 is going to make a real impact on his addiction or lack of.
Honestly thats what I would consider the correct answer? I mean we have no clue what he would end up using that money on. There are countless studies proving that peoples first impressions on people are incorrect a majority of the time. I would give him the $5. If he spent it on food, then great, I helped another human being. If he used it on alcohol, then there is nothing I can do. I didnt put the bottle in his hand, however I provided him with the chance of success and opportunity and he was the one that ruined the opportunity.

That would be ridiculous to be rejected for something as silly as that.
 
Albino, bro, you do realize you are not suppose to talk about the scenarios. I know your in medical school and its no consequence to you but still...
 
Honestly thats what I would consider the correct answer? I mean we have no clue what he would end up using that money on. There are countless studies proving that peoples first impressions on people are incorrect a majority of the time. I would give him the $5. If he spent it on food, then great, I helped another human being. If he used it on alcohol, then there is nothing I can do. I didnt put the bottle in his hand, however I provided him with the chance of success and opportunity and he was the one that ruined the opportunity.

That would be ridiculous to be rejected for something as silly as that.

How about gift cards to food places?
 
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