Yay or nay


  • Total voters
    135

chloeevangeline

Accepted!!!!!!! Ohmygodwhatishappening
Oct 3, 2017
73
66
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi,

I know lots of people have posted about this before but I am really hoping to only have the opinions of people who have had dogs while in medical school/residency.

I am starting school in August and have found a goldendoodle puppy that I really want! I grew up raising dogs and find a lot of enjoyment and stress relief from being around them! I am married so will have someone to help with caring for the dog. We plan on living close to campus.

Is it worth it? Should I get two dogs so they can have a pack? Is it too difficult?

I would really only prefer opinions from people who either have dogs in medical school or are in medical school and chose against the pup life.
 

mistafab

2+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2015
1,645
3,362
Status
Medical Student
Not about you - do you really have the time for the dog? Sure, year 1 and 2 you have many hours that you can care for a dog. What about years 3-4? Residency? Isn’t fair for the dog unless you have a plan for 12 hours a day that the dog is awake and active and you have to be at work.
 
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Nov 3, 2017
44
116
Haven’t started med school yet, but start in July - have a three year old husky and a ten year old fox hound; they’re my entire world and they kept me sane while working full time, studying for the MCAT, etc... we don’t have a choice, we’re going to find a way to make it work, because I wouldn’t give them up for anything. people have made it work in the past, hell people have made it work with kids AND dogs, there’s no reason you wouldn’t be able to as well, as long as you’re willing to make sacrifices!

Edit: just wanted to add something, just saw your comment about two dogs... getting a second dog was one of the best decisions my husband and I made. It actually made our lives easier, they keep each other company and double the walks keep us healthier and give us a chance to step away and clear our heads when we need it. But to each their own!
 

GoCubsGo20

2+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2016
500
666
Status
Medical Student
Haven’t started med school yet, but start in July - have a three year old husky and a ten year old fox hound; they’re my entire world and they kept me sane while working full time, studying for the MCAT, etc... we don’t have a choice, we’re going to find a way to make it work, because I wouldn’t give them up for anything. people have made it work in the past, hell people have made it work with kids AND dogs, there’s no reason you wouldn’t be able to as well, as long as you’re willing to make sacrifices!
Sacrifices are key. For example, don't sit at school and "study" with friends for hours on end. Get your stuff done and go home and be a good dog parent. I think that's a theme for all of med school, efficiency. Be efficient and deliberate with everything you do, otherwise you waste so much time.
 
Nov 3, 2017
44
116
Sacrifices are key. For example, don't sit at school and "study" with friends for hours on end. Get your stuff done and go home and be a good dog parent. I think that's a theme for all of med school, efficiency. Be efficient and deliberate with everything you do, otherwise you waste so much time.
Absolutely agree! Sure you’re waking up an hour earlier to feed and walk them, coming home on lunch when you can, and are forced to study at home more often, but the sacrifices are well worth it - taking a brief mental break to go for a jog around the block or just throw a tennis a ball a few times did wonders for my mental health through undergrad and studying for the MCAT!
 
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GoCubsGo20

2+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2016
500
666
Status
Medical Student
Absolutely agree! Sure you’re waking up an hour earlier to feed and walk them, coming home on lunch when you can, and are forced to study at home more often, but the sacrifices are well worth it - taking a brief mental break to go for a jog around the block or just throw a tennis a ball a few times did wonders for my mental health through undergrad and studying for the MCAT!
You hit the nail on the head my friend. It's so worth it.
 
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sumtimesuwonder

5+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2013
77
71
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I have a 5 month old puppy now and I am a first year. I also have a significant other who works from home which helps a lot. If your SO is on board I would say its worth it. It does limit how much you can do stuff like travel and go out (not that you'll be doing too much of that anyway). Nothing better than coming home to a puppy who is excited to see you though.
 

Pagan FutureDoc

2+ Year Member
Oct 28, 2015
1,032
1,432
Status
MD/PhD Student
My wife and I are holding off on getting dogs until she finished residency and I finish med school. But for us it’s more of an issue of space. We both like big active dogs (the kind that need a yard to run in) and right now we live in a small apartment close to the hospital so it’s not ideal for us right now. We do have a cat and bunny though
 

tiramisucheese

2+ Year Member
Jun 15, 2016
843
1,237
Status
Medical Student
As long as you have support of someone who is not in medical school, I think it's totally doable. Otherwise you'll be looking at major $$$ for doggy daycare or dog-walkers.
 
Dec 12, 2017
210
371
Status
Medical Student
I'm really worried about what I'm going to do with my senior dog while in med school. I don't have anyone who will be around to help care for her. I can't imagine re-homing her when she is at such an advanced age and has had such a tough life in shelters already. Doggy daycare is way too expensive to fund on the small amount of loan money I will get for living expenses. Then if she's still around come rotation time, that's a whole 'nother set of complications.

Will heading home in between classes to take her on a quick walk even be a thing that is possible in med school?
 

lpp06

5+ Year Member
Sep 16, 2012
1,098
2,021
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I'm really worried about what I'm going to do with my senior dog while in med school. I don't have anyone who will be around to help care for her. I can't imagine re-homing her when she is at such an advanced age and has had such a tough life in shelters already. Doggy daycare is way too expensive to fund on the small amount of loan money I will get for living expenses. Then if she's still around come rotation time, that's a whole 'nother set of complications.

Will heading home in between classes to take her on a quick walk even be a thing that is possible in med school?
Depends on the school's attendance policy, but most are shifting towards non-mandatory lectures. You'll have more windows to go home during the preclinical years than you expect. As for the clinical years, you hit the head on the nail as this could get a bit shaky since some of your clerkships will have longer hours than others.

Services like Wag/Rover offer pretty decent rates for one-off dog walks and check ins for your more desperate days.
 

SirCourageWolf

2+ Year Member
Sep 3, 2016
153
159
Status
Pre-Medical
As far as I see it, giving up my dog is not an option and I'll do whatever it takes to make it work. She's my only family.
 
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Reactions: naway
Dec 12, 2017
210
371
Status
Medical Student
Depends on the school's attendance policy, but most are shifting towards non-mandatory lectures. You'll have more windows to go home during the preclinical years than you expect. As for the clinical years, you hit the head on the nail as this could get a bit shaky since some of your clerkships will have longer hours than others.

Services like Wag/Rover offer pretty decent rates for one-off dog walks and check ins for your more desperate days.
I had no idea about those dog-walking apps. Will definitely have to check those out, thanks!!
 

GoCubsGo20

2+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2016
500
666
Status
Medical Student
I'm really worried about what I'm going to do with my senior dog while in med school. I don't have anyone who will be around to help care for her. I can't imagine re-homing her when she is at such an advanced age and has had such a tough life in shelters already. Doggy daycare is way too expensive to fund on the small amount of loan money I will get for living expenses. Then if she's still around come rotation time, that's a whole 'nother set of complications.

Will heading home in between classes to take her on a quick walk even be a thing that is possible in med school?
You're going to have to make it possible if that's what you want. If that means sacrifice in other areas than so be it. Is it manageable? Yes, 100%.
 
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