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Help! What can I do? Low GPA (2.2) - Junior in HS.

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schoolpurposes

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Hey, there! I'm going to be typing this in a rush since it's nearly 2:30 am and I have to wake up at five for school. Anyways, I just want to start off with a little about me (note: "little" is an understatement). If you're willing to read, then please do so. I honestly don't know what to do.

I personally think I am an average individual when it comes intellect. I'm not a genius, or even above average, but I don't think I am below average either. Though I'm probably very close to below average, aha. Since the 8th grade, I've had a few major medical problems that surfaced. For instance, I have a hormonal imbalance and mild depression (I'm better now). There are days I can sleep for 20 hours without waking up. I also get my period every five to eight months. I'm going to get another blood test taken to pinpoint what's up in a few weeks. I'm working on the rest, too, I've got a great circle of friends that I have been going out with and I've been going to the gym as of late to help with the hormonal imbalance that is caused by a sedentary lifestyle.

I currently have a 2.2 GPA for 1st semester (6.0 scale; even less with a 4.0) and I'm going to be a junior next year. That's pretty darn bad and it is 100% my fault, I know. In both freshman and the 1st semester of sophomore year, I didn't try whatsoever. In fact, I almost didn't obtain credit for freshman year because I missed many days throughout the school year since all I wanted to do was sleep. I slightly got my act together during the end of 1st semester and talked to my counselor about dual credit classes (college). She told me to take the TSI and that if I were to pass the reading and writing section, I'd be able to take the classes. I took the test and passed on my first try as English is my best subject, and am now enrolled in the program. Retaking math since I failed, though. It's $162/per class, so I'm definitely going to make sure that I pass each and every one lol. By the end of senior year, I will have my general studies associates (61 hours) and a veterinary assistant certification if I pass the exam offered at my school. I'm taking dual classes both this and next summer as well to make-up for classes and to get ahead. These classes during the summer will apparently not count towards my high school GPA. I made A's in both the classes that I took this semester, but I don't think they boosted my high school GPA at all since I have the same GPA I had in the beginning of 1st semester. The rest of my classes are regular and are for my endorsement. At my school, regular is weighted at 4.0, dual credit 5.0 and AP 6.0. I will be taking eleven more dual credit classes during the school year (BCIS, Art 2, Philosophy, Sociology, History 1301/1302, English 1301/1302, Biology 1/2, & Algebra). This summer I am taking TX Govt, Fed Govt & Economics. Next summer will be Spanish 1/& 2 along with speech.

I am planning to pass my dual credit classes with A's and the harder ones with AT LEAST a B. Regular classes are easy classes. I'm sure even a 5th grader could pass if they did the work, but I would slack off because the moment I get home, I would sleep around 4 pm and then wake up at 5 am. I have gotten A LOT better though, these days instead of oversleeping, I end up sleeping little to none lol. I have also been a lot more active now and am on-top of my grades whenever an assignment is due. My worst subject is math though and since I only started listening mid 2nd semester to what was being taught, I was far behind everyone else. Then again, it also didn't help that my teacher is new and that only four students out of 25 would pass the tests he gave us. I currently have a C in that class and uh, my semester grade for him will be a B. Though I doubt that matters since I have a C or D in his class for 1st semester. ----- I am planning on getting math level 8th through 10th grade workbooks to study over this summer, so that I can get back on track with the other kids. On the other hand, My English teacher has talked to me numerous times and has asked if I would like for him to recommend me to AP English 3. I may take the class.. I'm just afraid of the workload since I am sure it is quite a lot. I don't think I am smart enough either. It would help me with my GPA, though. Side note, he also has asked if I would want to join poetry club. :p

I believe the highest GPA for the dual credit classes = 4.0 and I'm going to aim for that. Imo, those classes are relatively easy. For high school, I'm pretty much screwed. I doubt it's even possible for me to get a 2.8 IF I were to get straight A's in regular, dual credit and possibly one AP class.. I probably have around seven to nine C's in my transcript. :( I'm planning on joining lots of clubs next year and getting leadership positions. This year, the only club I joined was Recycling club and I was just a member. Next year I will be joining SkillsUSA, Student Counsel, Recycling Club (Secretary), Food Appreciation, Track and Dance. I'm going to apply to every scholarship that I am eligible for, too. Not the ones that need you to have a high GPA, but the ones that are like essay qualifiers and inspirational videos.

What are your opinions on what I should do? I was planning on one day becoming a veterinarian, but I don't know if that goal is possible anymore. Before the dual credit classes, I was thinking of going to a community college for 2 years right after high school and then transferring to a good enough 4-year that will get the job done. After that, an additional 4 years in vet school. Now that I'm going to get an associate degree, I may just go for a year to cross off other required pre-req's needed for the college that I was originally planning to go to (Texas A&M, College Station). I could do the other required pre-req's there at Texas A&M as well since I heard it's looked down upon to do all pre-req's at a community college. :ninja:

Is there anything that you recommend I do to boost up my high school GPA and to bring myself up from my massive failure of a transcript by doing extracurriculars outside of class/or after-school? And based off the scores I have as of right now, what do you think is the highest high school GPA I could get? I'll be posting my 4-year school plan once I get a few more replies on this thread. Do you think I should go through with AP English 3? I heard it is better to get a B or C in a 6.0 weighted class than an A in Reg English 3, which is weighted at 4.0. I am currently a sophomore and will be a junior next year.

Oh yeah, I'm going to be volunteering at my local animal shelter this summer as well.

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Sorry for the unnecessary information and rant! I'm hyped and discouraged at the same time.
 
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cellowars

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I understand you feeling tired from your hormone issues, but, you're gonna have to push yourself to stay awake and study for at least 2 hours a day (you'll be studying a lot longer in vet school). Drink coffee, play loud music, whatever it takes to help you stay awake. Hire a tutor. Get help from your teachers after school. Make going to bed a reward for getting your homework done. If you want to be a veterinary professional, be it a veterinarian or a veterinary technician, you need to attain an average GPA of at least a 3.0 out of 4.0, as most schools don't accept anything lower than that. I would also recommend fulfilling your general education requirements at a community college before attending a university. In general, they are much easier at a community college than a university, and will help get them out of the way so you can focus on your degree. You are gonna have to work really hard for the rest of your highschool career if you want to work in the veterinary field, but, I believe you have what it takes to do it. Good luck!

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dyachei

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So the biggest take away is that you're still in high school. Your gpa there doesn't matter for vet school in the future. So take a deep breath and know it will probably be OK.

To apply to vet school you will need to do well in college (community college as a starting point or even for 4 years is fine). There are hundreds of hours of classes you will need so I wouldn't worry about the few dual credit courses that much.

Now is your chance to find a way to study that works for you. And get some sleep. Your brain can't function on 3 hrs of sleep. The best thing I ever did was give my brain the rest it needed so I could actually be receptive to new information
 
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schoolpurposes

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@cellowars - Yeah, definitely! I've been pushing myself to stay awake, but there are times that I just blackout. My grades are okay now ('cept for Geometry which I should have studied for 2 hours a day for, but I barely understand 8th grade math). I made sure to study for at least a few hours every week for my dual credit classes, hence why I passed with A's. I'm getting a few of the basic general education requirements out of the way at the moment, but of course there will be more that I have to complete. This is why I am thinking of going to community college for a year right after high school IF my GPA for dual credit is good. The thing is my high school GPA is a problem..
 
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schoolpurposes

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@dyachei - That's true.. My sleeping habits have always been bad. :(:( It's either I sleep for 20+ hours or for three hours. I'm going to to work on it by getting at least nine hours of sleep this summer. It's such an essential.

Could you, or anyone reading this post, please explain to me the steps in becoming a veterinarian? Normally don't you have to get a bachelor's degree in either biology or animal science and then apply for vet school in order to get your DVM? Is the DVM a special kind of program or is it another degree (PhD)? After getting your DVM, you have to take a test in order to license, correct? :thinking:

Reference that I skimmed over real quick: What Undergraduate Degree Is Best for Vet School?
 

Coopah

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@dyachei - That's true.. My sleeping habits have always been bad. :(:( It's either I sleep for 20+ hours or for three hours. I'm going to to work on it by getting at least nine hours of sleep this summer. It's such an essential.

Could you, or anyone reading this post, please explain to me the steps in becoming a veterinarian? Normally don't you have to get a bachelor's degree in either biology or animal science and then apply for vet school in order to get your DVM? Is the DVM a special kind of program or is it another degree (PhD)? After getting your DVM, you have to take a test in order to license, correct? :thinking:

Reference that I skimmed over real quick: What Undergraduate Degree Is Best for Vet School?
So you don't have to major in biology or something specific to become a veterinarian, for instance I majored in math. You go to college and obtain your prerequisites, a lot of people do community college for the first two years then transfer to a 4 year college to finish up. I'm not sure about your situation exactly with those dual credits. (Also I hated geometry too ;)) During college (or before) you need to get experience under the supervision of a veterinarian for what we call vet experience. Some schools have minimums and they want so many hours. After you get your bachelors in whatever you think you would like to do besides vet school, you apply to veterinary school. A DVM is a title like MD is for a doctor, so there is a separate 4 year program to obtain a DVM. Once you graduate (or during your fourth year) you take the national licensing exam called the NAVLE. With your diploma and license you are a veterinarian.
 

dyachei

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@dyachei - That's true.. My sleeping habits have always been bad. :(:( It's either I sleep for 20+ hours or for three hours. I'm going to to work on it by getting at least nine hours of sleep this summer. It's such an essential.

Could you, or anyone reading this post, please explain to me the steps in becoming a veterinarian? Normally don't you have to get a bachelor's degree in either biology or animal science and then apply for vet school in order to get your DVM? Is the DVM a special kind of program or is it another degree (PhD)? After getting your DVM, you have to take a test in order to license, correct? :thinking:

Reference that I skimmed over real quick: What Undergraduate Degree Is Best for Vet School?
I honestly wouldn't follow the advice given by cello. It's a quick path to burn out and it isn't necessary. You should get the sleep no matter what. The homework/studying comes second. I mean it.

Generally getting into vet school goes like this:
Take pre-requisites necessary for the vet school(s) of your choice. Do your best to do well in those classes. Most schools do give some preference for normal to higher workloads in college as they want to make sure you can handle the rigor of vet school. Often, people get the bachelor's degree. Often it's in a science. This is because many of the pre-reqs put you past the halfway point for these degrees. Apply using VMCAS. Some schools are phasing out the GRE, but many still require it, so you'll have to take that, too, most likely. You'll also need to get veterinary experience (and really, you should get this anyway, because you need to make sure this is the field for you). Get into vet school. Work your butt off to pass classes. Take the NAVLE during your 4th year of vet school and apply for a state license in order to take it. Graduate with a DVM and realize you've now achieved your dreams.
 
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cdo96

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Also, it's worth mentioning that you don't have to major in a science to go to vet school! I know @WildZoo majored in English and I think? @Coopah majored in Statistics. You actually don't even need to have a degree actually, as long as you get the pre-requisite classes in! I'm starting vet school in the fall, and I won't have a degree at the time.

Personally, I recommend not majoring in "pre-vet" if your school offers it. I had a friend who majored in pre vet who didn't get accepted to vet school for 3 years in a row, and she had no backup plan. So major in something you like and you're good at.

I was like you in HS. HS was rough. Much harder than most of college. But you gotta take care of yourself first, and realize that it's gonna be okay. I got 3 hours of sleep a night every day my junior and senior year of HS. And it sucked- and my grades mimicked that.

Learn how to study smarter, not harder. Go to a doctor to help with your hormone imbalance and start figuring out what it is you can do better. And get some sleep, you really do need it.
 
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WildZoo

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A summoning!
Yes, I was a double major in Biology and English Writing. The bio major worked out because pre-reqs for the vet schools I was applying to lined up real nice with the requirements for the Bio degree. But I had extra space in my schedule and a tuition scholarship, so I used it to pursue one of my other passions. It definitely made my undergrad experience more enjoyable.

All that to say, you don't need to worry about that right now. I second everything dyachei has said. Taking care of yourself should be your top priority. Everything else is secondary.
 
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TrashPanda

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You have plenty of time to focus on getting in to vet school later :)

The AAVMC has some resources for pre-vets starting from before high school through college that you may find helpful: Pre-Veterinary Resources
 
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twelvetigers

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Try to do better from now in in HS, and be ready to do well in college, because college will be what counts the most. Try to go somewhere that won't put you in debt. The rest, you'll figure out as you go.
 
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cellowars

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I honestly wouldn't follow the advice given by cello. It's a quick path to burn out and it isn't necessary. You should get the sleep no matter what. The homework/studying comes second. I mean it.

Generally getting into vet school goes like this:
Take pre-requisites necessary for the vet school(s) of your choice. Do your best to do well in those classes. Most schools do give some preference for normal to higher workloads in college as they want to make sure you can handle the rigor of vet school. Often, people get the bachelor's degree. Often it's in a science. This is because many of the pre-reqs put you past the halfway point for these degrees. Apply using VMCAS. Some schools are phasing out the GRE, but many still require it, so you'll have to take that, too, most likely. You'll also need to get veterinary experience (and really, you should get this anyway, because you need to make sure this is the field for you). Get into vet school. Work your butt off to pass classes. Take the NAVLE during your 4th year of vet school and apply for a state license in order to take it. Graduate with a DVM and realize you've now achieved your dreams.
4pm-5am. . . That's 11hrs of sleep. That leaves no time for studying. If you shave that down to 8 hours every night, that leaves 3 more hours for studying. That's what I was talking about. I wasn't saying to pull all-nighters.

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dyachei

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4pm-5am. . . That's 11hrs of sleep. That leaves no time for studying. If you shave that down to 8 hours every night, that leaves 3 more hours for studying. That's what I was talking about. I wasn't saying to pull all-nighters.

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The user was talking about getting a total of 3 hrs sleep this last night.

so it comes across weirdly when you say to reward yourself with sleep.

and the OP is in HS, some teenage brains need 11 hrs a night. It's just how it is
 

cellowars

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The user was talking about getting a total of 3 hrs sleep this last night.

so it comes across weirdly when you say to reward yourself with sleep.

and the OP is in HS, some teenage brains need 11 hrs a night. It's just how it is
They also talked about going to bed at 4pm and waking up at 5am. My doctors have also told me that more than 7-9 hours of sleep per day is unhealthy for anyone because you don't get enough sunlight to replenish your vitamin D stores, and not having enough vitamin D can lead to depression. I have experienced this myself. I have bipolar disorder, and, I used to sleep for 12+ hours a day when I went into a depressive episode. I find that when I make myself get out of bed after 8 hours and do something that requires at least a small amount of energy (i.e. get dressed), I feel good about myself for accomplishing that one task, I sleep deeper, I don't need to sleep as long, and my episodes don't last as long.

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cellowars

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@cellowars - Yeah, definitely! I've been pushing myself to stay awake, but there are times that I just blackout. My grades are okay now ('cept for Geometry which I should have studied for 2 hours a day for, but I barely understand 8th grade math). I made sure to study for at least a few hours every week for my dual credit classes, hence why I passed with A's. I'm getting a few of the basic general education requirements out of the way at the moment, but of course there will be more that I have to complete. This is why I am thinking of going to community college for a year right after high school IF my GPA for dual credit is good. The thing is my high school GPA is a problem..
You mentioned that you have a hormone imbalance and trouble with your period. Have you ever been screened for Hashimoto's Disease? It's an autoimmune condition where the immune system attacks the endocrine glands (mainly the thyroid), which are responsible for regulating your metabolism and reproductive system. It can cause an irregular menstrual cycle, make you feel cold, and profound fatigue. For me, it started after I got really sick from an active flu vaccine. After I got well, I kept feeling cold, and I didn't have the energy to do anything. I started falling asleep in class despite getting a full night's sleep every night, I fell behind in school, my periods were very irregular, and my athletic performance declined. One morning, I woke up with pain and swelling in the front of my neck. My mom took me to the doctor that day, and they found that my thyroid was really swollen and had completely shut down. I was given an artificial thyroid hormone and am doing much better now.

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cellowars

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@dyachei - That's true.. My sleeping habits have always been bad. :(:( It's either I sleep for 20+ hours or for three hours. I'm going to to work on it by getting at least nine hours of sleep this summer. It's such an essential.

Could you, or anyone reading this post, please explain to me the steps in becoming a veterinarian? Normally don't you have to get a bachelor's degree in either biology or animal science and then apply for vet school in order to get your DVM? Is the DVM a special kind of program or is it another degree (PhD)? After getting your DVM, you have to take a test in order to license, correct? :thinking:

Reference that I skimmed over real quick: What Undergraduate Degree Is Best for Vet School?
I only plan to get a tech degree, but, from what I understand, you have to go through four years of pre-vet, then four years of vet school to get a DVM.

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I only plan to get a tech degree, but, from what I understand, you have to go through four years of pre-vet, then four years of vet school to get a DVM.

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No, you don't have to go through four years of pre-vet. It could be any amount of years, even two, depending on how long it takes for you to finish your pre-requisites. But yes, a DVM program is four years.
 
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dyachei

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No, you don't have to go through four years of pre-vet. It could be any amount of years, even two, depending on how long it takes for you to finish your pre-requisites. But yes, a DVM program is four years.
exactly. Most people tend to do it with a degree, but it's only necessary for a couple of schools
 

flameshock

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exactly. Most people tend to do it with a degree, but it's only necessary for a couple of schools

Some schools even have it set up where applicants track a certain undergraduate program, do three years of pre-req course work, are accepted into the affiliated vet school and receive a bachelors after completion of DVM year 1. I don't know how common that is but it certainly does exist.
 
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cdo96

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Some schools even have it set up where applicants track a certain undergraduate program, do three years of pre-req course work, are accepted into the affiliated vet school and receive a bachelors after completion of DVM year 1. I don't know how common that is but it certainly does exist.
OkState does this! I know this because I'm on that track right now! And for us, we weren't even required to go to OkState vet school to do this- any vet/ med/ pharmacy/ dental school will work!
 

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OkState does this! I know this because I'm on that track right now! And for us, we weren't even required to go to OkState vet school to do this- any vet/ med/ pharmacy/ dental school will work!
There were quite a few who got their diplomas from 2020 this year with that program.
 
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wheelin2vetmed

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When I think back
On all the crap I learned in high school
It's a wonder
I can think at all
And though my lack of education
Hasn't hurt me none
I can read the writing on the wall


High school will have no effect on your future plans for vet school. Try to enjoy it and don't stress about it. The fun experiences will be what you remember, because truthfully, that history or english class you didn't do the best in doesn't mean jack. College is where you start proving yourself, grade wise.

My opinion: if you want to start doing something now, get some experiences shadowing doctors and working around animals. That's way more meaningful at your age, and you can actually put that down on your VMCAS application down the road. Keep a file of what you did, what you saw, and the hours you put in.
 
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twelvetigers

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Trynna do better in HS will get you two things:

If you get better grades (and a decent ACT/SAT score) you can potentially get scholarships to college and that help keep that debt down.

And:

Learning to study well and having a bit of a foundation for the science courses will make college an easier transition for you. I had a hard time because I put zero effort into HS and then college was actually, you know... hard.
 
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