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How many hours is "enough"?

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Peritwinkle

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Hello everyone!

This is my first time posting on this forum; I've been reading a lot of threads lately as a guest, which has been so helpful in figuring out the process to get into vet school, so thank you everyone for sharing your experiences and being such a resource for us newbies! :happy:

Now onto my issue...
I'm currently a sophomore undergrad Bio major (contemplating an art minor) with a 3.87 GPA (although I've just started taking o-chem, so we can expect that score to drop fairly soon..heh :dead:) aiming to get into Texas A&M as an out-of-state student (as well as in Florida, Cali, potentially Alabama, Tenessee, and Oregon).

The problem is that I currently only have about 200 hours, which was from working at the bird's department at the San Antonio Zoo for an internship I did this past summer. I badly want to volunteer at a clinic, but I'm so limited on time as well as transportation since I'm not in a good location to get to any nearby clinics (I don't have a car, so I have to walk :().

If I were to get hours at a vet clinic in Texas over the summer (say 200-300 hrs), would that be "enough" to be considered an okay applicant in terms of volunteering? I know it's not much, and I know that I'd just by barely be meeting the minimum hour requirement for vet school (around 100-200 hours), but I'd just like to hear any thoughts or advice.

After reading the "what are my chances" thread, I'm utterly terrified of the rejection I may face from my lack of hours, considering most people had thousands of hours, and at various clinics. I'm a really hard worker, so I can at least hope that I'll have the GPA to make it (however the GRE's are in the air since I haven't taken it yet).

Also, in terms of extracurricular activities, I don't really do any formal ones. I'm in the Pre-vet club for school, but that's it. I've also never had a formal job because I've worked as a freelance voice actress, virtual assistant, and musician all these years because it's so flexible. I do have hobbies outside of school, like drawing/painting and guitar playing, but I don't really know how much this will all do me since these aren't "formally documented" activities.

What do you guys think? Any input would be tremendously appreciated. Thank you so much in advance! :joyful:
 

wildlifer

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When are you planning to apply? You're in your sophomore year, so you still have plenty of time to gain more hours in a clinic, zoo, what have you. You could also consider taking a gap year after you graduate from undergrad just to specifically gain more hours :).
 
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scott1818

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Yeah as @wildlifer said, you still have a lot of time to accumulate hours. If you plan to apply during the beginning of your senior year then you will have 2 years, including 2 summers, to get experience hours. You should try to get as many as you can during the summers. If you can find a way to get to a clinic or something near your school (maybe by bus, bike, Uber, etc.) even once a week, that will make a big difference and the hours will accumulate quickly.

If you really think you won't be able to get more than a few hundred hours, then be sure to focus on keeping your gpa high like it is now. Also try to get an e-board position with the pre-vet club if you have the time.

Sounds like the work experience you have is interesting and unique so I wouldn't worry much about that. Just keep your mind set on getting great grades and as much vet experience as possible.
 

Trilt

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The point of those experience hours isn't necessarily to fill the requirement set by the vet schools, it is to truly determine whether you want to be a veterinarian and (hopefully) check out many of the different fields available with the degree. A.k.a... how the heck do you know you want to be a veterinarian if you've never spent time in a vet clinic?

So make it a priority. Don't let it interfere with your grades (dial back on other things if you need to) but you have lots of time to get some solid volunteering in. I hadn't stepped foot in a vet clinic (ever... my family didn't "do" vet care) until the summer of my sophomore year of university and still managed to spend time with a good variety of different clinics before I applied as a senior. I also did not have a car; I took the bus, bummed rides in exchange for lunches, and biked all over the place to get the hours in. It can definitely be done. Just don't lose sight of the fact that these hours aren't just another hoop to jump through... they're meant for you to decide whether you want to sink $100k+ and four very crazy years of your life into becoming a part of the profession, and if so, what part(s) of the profession you're interested in.
 
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that redhead

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Agree 100% with what Trilt has already said. How do you know you want to be a veterinarian if you haven't actually experienced the field?

To directly answer the question: there really isn't any particular cut-off (other than posted minimums, obviously) that is "enough" for a successful application. A successful applicant has a balance - strong grades, quality experience hours that demonstrate to admissions that you have at least a basic understanding of what the day-to-day work entails and what some of the challenges are, extra-curricular activities that make you a "real human" and not just a box-checking automaton and enthusiastic letter writers. Certainly some areas can be weaker and counter-balanced by stronger areas, but even a 4.0 applicant needs to prove they've explored the field of veterinary medicine and aren't just there because they love animals.
 
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Peritwinkle

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When are you planning to apply? You're in your sophomore year, so you still have plenty of time to gain more hours in a clinic, zoo, what have you. You could also consider taking a gap year after you graduate from undergrad just to specifically gain more hours :).


Actually, I was originally planning on applying during senior to have that gap year after I graduate for more experience, but I then I realized that I probably should at least try to apply junior year so I could know where my stance is at in getting accepted (hopefully I'll be able to ask the admissions offices for feedback on my application if I get rejected). I've been doing well with coming to terms with the possibility of rejection for the first application cycle, so I'm not really as pressured to get in the first time as I used to be. :p
 

Peritwinkle

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Yeah as @wildlifer said, you still have a lot of time to accumulate hours. If you plan to apply during the beginning of your senior year then you will have 2 years, including 2 summers, to get experience hours. You should try to get as many as you can during the summers. If you can find a way to get to a clinic or something near your school (maybe by bus, bike, Uber, etc.) even once a week, that will make a big difference and the hours will accumulate quickly.

If you really think you won't be able to get more than a few hundred hours, then be sure to focus on keeping your gpa high like it is now. Also try to get an e-board position with the pre-vet club if you have the time.

Sounds like the work experience you have is interesting and unique so I wouldn't worry much about that. Just keep your mind set on getting great grades and as much vet experience as possible.


Oh, that's so encouraging! I'm so glad to hear that my work experience isn't a problem. :happy: I never thought about trying to get an "e-board" position at my pre-vet club before..that's such a great idea! I hope my club has that option.

If I were to apply during junior year, would 500 hours total be enough? And just to clarify, if I were to apply in my junior year, it would be in the summer before senior year right? Or would it be even earlier?
 

scott1818

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Oh, that's so encouraging! I'm so glad to hear that my work experience isn't a problem. :happy: I never thought about trying to get an "e-board" position at my pre-vet club before..that's such a great idea! I hope my club has that option.

If I were to apply during junior year, would 500 hours total be enough? And just to clarify, if I were to apply in my junior year, it would be in the summer before senior year right? Or would it be even earlier?
Yeah 500 hours isn't bad, but I would try to get as much diversity as you can. If you can get with a small animal vet, a large animal vet, and do some zoo/wildlife/exotics, all in 500 hours, you should be ok.

And yes, most people apply the summer between their junior and senior year. Just be sure you have most of your pre-reqs completed by then.
 

Peritwinkle

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@Trilt Wow, it's so helpful to hear about how you did it since I'm basically in your position right now. That definitely makes it sound pretty doable. :joyful:I'll try to see what I can do with the transportation issue; you gave me some awesome ideas (ones that have to do with friends and cookies ;))! I'll definitely try to do what I can and not stress too much about the hours. I appreciate your input greatly!

@that redhead And thank you as well for solidifying the idea that hours aren't everything. This issue has been on my mind for months..I've been feeling so doubtful lately that I'll get into any vet school simply because of my lack of experience compared to all the other wonderful candidates in the application pool. It's stressed me out so much that I've even had a few existential crises over it, which is even more discouraging because it makes me think these bad thoughts like "You literally just started your sophomore year of undergrad college and you're already breaking down. You won't survive the rigor of vet school." :dead:

Sorry for the negative nancy rant, it's just been tough trying to keep my motivation to continue this path, even though it's literally the only thing I want to do (and has been since I was 8). It's just difficult when I can't seem to designate the time to volunteer without sacrificing much-needed study time, and my grades have always been so important to me. But gahh I know I need to volunteer some time.. and soon since it'll be harder these next semesters when I'll have tons of hard classes piled on each other. That'll surely be a challenge. :drowning:

But really, thank you all for taking the time out of your days to give me some encouragement. It was very much-needed and refreshing. :)
 

Peritwinkle

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Yeah 500 hours isn't bad, but I would try to get as much diversity as you can. If you can get with a small animal vet, a large animal vet, and do some zoo/wildlife/exotics, all in 500 hours, you should be ok.

And yes, most people apply the summer between their junior and senior year. Just be sure you have most of your pre-reqs completed by then.


Ohh I see. Thanks for that! I'm in the middle of trying to figure out my next 3 years in terms of classes I need to take before applying, when to study for the GRE, etc. In fact, it's what made me finally make a thread on my issue, since registration for spring classes at my uni is coming up soon. :p
 

TrashPanda

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I didn't get any vet hours until after I graduated college. I applied this summer with about 900 veterinary hours (and almost as many animal hours), and the vast majority of those are from the past 2 or 3 years when I was working full time. I use my vacation time and weekends to the max, and sometimes volunteer before or after work. I don't have a car and usually spend 1 - 2 hrs commuting (round-trip) to where I volunteer or shadow.

It's not easy, but it can be done!
 
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Peritwinkle

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I didn't get any vet hours until after I graduated college. I applied this summer with about 900 veterinary hours (and almost as many animal hours), and the vast majority of those are from the past 2 or 3 years when I was working full time. I use my vacation time and weekends to the max, and sometimes volunteer before or after work. I don't have a car and usually spend 1 - 2 hrs commuting (round-trip) to where I volunteer or shadow.

It's not easy, but it can be done!

Wow, you're so dedicated! That's awesome! I'll definitely try to see what I can do then. If I can't find the time, I'll try to make it.:happy:
 
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WhtsThFrequency

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@Trilt Wow, it's so helpful to hear about how you did it since I'm basically in your position right now. That definitely makes it sound pretty doable. :joyful:I'll try to see what I can do with the transportation issue; you gave me some awesome ideas (ones that have to do with friends and cookies ;))! I'll definitely try to do what I can and not stress too much about the hours. I appreciate your input greatly!

@that redhead And thank you as well for solidifying the idea that hours aren't everything. This issue has been on my mind for months..I've been feeling so doubtful lately that I'll get into any vet school simply because of my lack of experience compared to all the other wonderful candidates in the application pool. It's stressed me out so much that I've even had a few existential crises over it, which is even more discouraging because it makes me think these bad thoughts like "You literally just started your sophomore year of undergrad college and you're already breaking down. You won't survive the rigor of vet school." :dead:

Sorry for the negative nancy rant, it's just been tough trying to keep my motivation to continue this path, even though it's literally the only thing I want to do (and has been since I was 8). It's just difficult when I can't seem to designate the time to volunteer without sacrificing much-needed study time, and my grades have always been so important to me. But gahh I know I need to volunteer some time.. and soon since it'll be harder these next semesters when I'll have tons of hard classes piled on each other. That'll surely be a challenge. :drowning:

But really, thank you all for taking the time out of your days to give me some encouragement. It was very much-needed and refreshing. :)

Others have given you good advice, but I wanted to point out as few things I noticed here, just to keep you thinking.

1. "Literally the only thing you want to do and has been since you were 8" --> while I understand passion, this reads to me as extremely idealistic given that in those years you could not possibly have known anything about the field other than what you were told. It's great you are addressing said experience - but you have to be prepared for the possibility that a) you may not like it nearly as much as you thought or b) you might not get in. Ever. That's a hard thing to think about, but you need to. You need to always be open to other career choices. The fact that you are having "utterly terrified" and having "crises" over worrying about getting into vet school means you are placing too much value on this single career option.

2. "My grades have always been so important to me" - why? Grades may be important, but never let your opinion of yourself or your self-worth rely on them. Hint: Grades are NOT a good measure of a person. They are nothing to be proud of. Especially in college where most of it is dumb rote memorization combined with a sad lack of problem-solving skill acquisition. All they are good for is just punching your ticket to move on to the next step in education - they are "important" only in that sense.
 
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I'm a senior (undergrad) right now and I've set out every Saturday since I was a sophomore to volunteer and gain experience. I was in the same boat as you, always worrying about my grades more so than getting a job or whatever. But I gained over 600 hours at the place I volunteered at and now intern at, and I just got accepted to Midwestern! Don't give up hope, you've still got plenty of time and can make it work! Quality is definitely better than quantity :)
 
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Peritwinkle

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Others have given you good advice, but I wanted to point out as few things I noticed here, just to keep you thinking.

1. "Literally the only thing you want to do and has been since you were 8" --> while I understand passion, this reads to me as extremely idealistic given that in those years you could not possibly have known anything about the field other than what you were told. It's great you are addressing said experience - but you have to be prepared for the possibility that a) you may not like it nearly as much as you thought or b) you might not get in. Ever. That's a hard thing to think about, but you need to. You need to always be open to other career choices. The fact that you are having "utterly terrified" and having "crises" over worrying about getting into vet school means you are placing too much value on this single career option.

2. "My grades have always been so important to me" - why? Grades may be important, but never let your opinion of yourself or your self-worth rely on them. Hint: Grades are NOT a good measure of a person. They are nothing to be proud of. Especially in college where most of it is dumb rote memorization combined with a sad lack of problem-solving skill acquisition. All they are good for is just punching your ticket to move on to the next step in education - they are "important" only in that sense.


Wow, thank you so much for your input! :happy: You bring up some really good points!
It's true that most of what I know at the moment is very idealistic, especially since I have yet to volunteer at a clinic. However, I have read some articles and blog posts about compassion fatigue and the not so pretty side of getting into this sort of career from vets who have been practicing for several years, so although I haven't had this experience first hand, I know from doing a bit of research that it's not puppies and rainbows. This idea got me thinking for a while too, and it's part of the reason why I've been fluctuating so much with what I want to do in the future. But in the end, I confirmed that nothing could make me happier than medically helping animals. When I volunteer at a clinic soon, that should be clear to me-- and if not, well time to switch career focuses! I've also been fluctuating a lot this past year due to the other passions I've had. I would love to be an artist or an entrepreneur, but diving right into doing that could really be hit or miss in the long-run, so vet school is the more stable option for me. But if I never get in, I still have other passions I could work on. It would just be unfortunate to have to "start over" in my career planning. What other options did you have aside from being a vet when you were in college?

As for the grades topic, thank you, haha. I really needed that wake-up call. Throughout my life, my friends and parents have "defined" me by my grades. It didn't help that I was surrounded by a bunch of smart peers in high school, so their high value in good grades (due to wanting to attend ivy league schools) rubbed off on me for sure. As weird as it sounds, I've never thought about them as a "ticket puncher" to move onto the next education system. I'll try to see it that way from now on though so I don't kick myself for getting bad grades in organic chemistry or something. :p
 
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Peritwinkle

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I'm a senior (undergrad) right now and I've set out every Saturday since I was a sophomore to volunteer and gain experience. I was in the same boat as you, always worrying about my grades more so than getting a job or whatever. But I gained over 600 hours at the place I volunteered at and now intern at, and I just got accepted to Midwestern! Don't give up hope, you've still got plenty of time and can make it work! Quality is definitely better than quantity :)

That's amazing! I'm so happy for you! I love reading messages like this; it gives me hope! ;u; Thank you for the encouragement!:happy:
 
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katashark

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I didn't know I wanted to go to vet school until I had graduated. You've got plenty of time to get good hours in :) You've also got plenty of time to figure out the rest of your life. Don't feel pressured about suddenly choosing a path for your whole life, and don't feel bad if that path changes.
 

WhtsThFrequency

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Wow, thank you so much for your input! :happy: You bring up some really good points!
It's true that most of what I know at the moment is very idealistic, especially since I have yet to volunteer at a clinic. However, I have read some articles and blog posts about compassion fatigue and the not so pretty side of getting into this sort of career from vets who have been practicing for several years, so although I haven't had this experience first hand, I know from doing a bit of research that it's not puppies and rainbows. This idea got me thinking for a while too, and it's part of the reason why I've been fluctuating so much with what I want to do in the future. But in the end, I confirmed that nothing could make me happier than medically helping animals. When I volunteer at a clinic soon, that should be clear to me-- and if not, well time to switch career focuses! I've also been fluctuating a lot this past year due to the other passions I've had. I would love to be an artist or an entrepreneur, but diving right into doing that could really be hit or miss in the long-run, so vet school is the more stable option for me. But if I never get in, I still have other passions I could work on. It would just be unfortunate to have to "start over" in my career planning. What other options did you have aside from being a vet when you were in college?

As for the grades topic, thank you, haha. I really needed that wake-up call. Throughout my life, my friends and parents have "defined" me by my grades. It didn't help that I was surrounded by a bunch of smart peers in high school, so their high value in good grades (due to wanting to attend ivy league schools) rubbed off on me for sure. As weird as it sounds, I've never thought about them as a "ticket puncher" to move onto the next education system. I'll try to see it that way from now on though so I don't kick myself for getting bad grades in organic chemistry or something. :p

Good to hear it :) The reason I bring up the grades this in particular is because being *too* obsessed with them is a one-way ticket to burnout. Of course, you need to be mindful of them if you want to pursue things after vet school like internship or residency. But if your goal is to go straight into GP - no one is going to give a crap about your grades. No one cares about your NAVLE score. Being a good vet is NOT just about grades. In fact, in terms of the fourth year students I taught in residency, it was often the "straight A" ones who had no idea how to apply real world concepts and it was the "B" students who were much more balanced and "in tune." So don't put yourself in that mindset too early. Networking and experience are JUST as important (and in some cases even more important) than letter grades.

The whole "ticket punching" thing was something my dad taught me. He always said 'WTF, even if you don't like it, just get your ticket stamped and move on to really do what you like and prove yourself to people, not numbers."

Never lose sight of those other passions - they will become your foundation should you get into vet school. I have seen so many people become far too blinkered (including myself - I almost dropped out my third year due to burnout). Keep those passions and nurture them well. You will need them.

In terms of my options, I was a latecomer to vet med - I never even really considered it until my junior year. I was always a chem/biochem person and just figured I would get a PhD in whatever until I discovered that vet med had a lot more diversity in career options than I previous thought (although a lot of them requiring additional specialization). Almost all of my experience hours were research work - I worked one summer at a clinic literally to just say I had.
 

wheelin2vetmed

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As with any of these questions, I believe it's more important to look at yourself and your application holistically. Do you have diverse experiences under your belt? Have you proven, like WTF said, that you can work hard and punch that ticket to handle the rigor of vet school, grades-wise (I think you have with a 3.9)? What sets you apart from other people, and can you show through your personal statement and interviews (if you have them) why vet med is your calling? Of course you need to make basic cutoffs, but I think you as a person and how you handle yourself in the face of difficulty and adversity is more valuable than a few hundred experience hours.

Stats are stats. Maybe I'm biased based on how my application turned out, but I don't think lack of experience hours will necessarily ruin an applicant's chances. I was accepted with 100 hours.
 
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Peritwinkle

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@katashark Ah, thank you for that! That's definitely something I have problems coming to terms with because I'm that person who's always had a set plan for life (would you believe me if I told you the 12-year-old me planned for the college I'm at now? :laugh:). It's comforting knowing that you and many other people were able to figure out what you wanted to do eventually, even if it was a tiny bit later. I don't know, I think all these deadlines and the value of time gets to me too much, but I'll try to ease up a little and take a step back.

It really shouldn't matter so much as to when we find/pursue our passions, as long as it's done somehow right?:)

@wheelin2vetmed Goodness, I know the answers to all those questions in my heart, but I need to spend some time translating all that into words. That's amazing that you got in with 100 hours! You must've been a really outstanding applicant. Congrats, and thank you for the advice! :joyful:
 

Peritwinkle

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Good to hear it :) The reason I bring up the grades this in particular is because being *too* obsessed with them is a one-way ticket to burnout. Of course, you need to be mindful of them if you want to pursue things after vet school like internship or residency. But if your goal is to go straight into GP - no one is going to give a crap about your grades. No one cares about your NAVLE score. Being a good vet is NOT just about grades. In fact, in terms of the fourth year students I taught in residency, it was often the "straight A" ones who had no idea how to apply real world concepts and it was the "B" students who were much more balanced and "in tune." So don't put yourself in that mindset too early. Networking and experience are JUST as important (and in some cases even more important) than letter grades.

The whole "ticket punching" thing was something my dad taught me. He always said 'WTF, even if you don't like it, just get your ticket stamped and move on to really do what you like and prove yourself to people, not numbers."

Never lose sight of those other passions - they will become your foundation should you get into vet school. I have seen so many people become far too blinkered (including myself - I almost dropped out my third year due to burnout). Keep those passions and nurture them well. You will need them.

In terms of my options, I was a latecomer to vet med - I never even really considered it until my junior year. I was always a chem/biochem person and just figured I would get a PhD in whatever until I discovered that vet med had a lot more diversity in career options than I previous thought (although a lot of them requiring additional specialization). Almost all of my experience hours were research work - I worked one summer at a clinic literally to just say I had.

That's so true about the grade obsession leading to burnout. I'll try to work on the way I think about grades. It's a bit hard when I've been conditioned all my life to think that they're essentially my gateway to higher education, jobs, etc., but I'll manage!

Oh I see, that's a really good way to think about it! I wish I was encouraged the same way your dad encouraged you. That definitely would've eased the pressure on me in my high school years. xD

I swear it's like you read me like a book. o_O I'll try my best to hold onto my passions then! That's definitely useful to know since I've actually let my creative side go dormant for years to prioritize school, so thanks for that, haha!

That's really interesting! Personally, I had similar aspirations to be a marine biologist and get a PhD down the line, but I realized later that working in a lab all day wasn't really for me and that I wanted to impact animal lives directly, so I switched focuses back to my childhood dream career.

Thank you so much for the tips and wisdom! I greatly appreciate your help!:happy:
 

wheelin2vetmed

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That's so true about the grade obsession leading to burnout. I'll try to work on the way I think about grades. It's a bit hard when I've been conditioned all my life to think that they're essentially my gateway to higher education, jobs, etc., but I'll manage!

They are your gateway, but just make an active effort to realize once you get accepted, that shouldn't be the case anymore. I had to be PERFECT in undergrad, hell, I'm a perfectionist by nature. But to be honest, it was very easy for me to switch mentalities. I'm around 130-ish smart people every day, but we're all in the program and have what it takes to become doctors. My first exam was the lowest score I've ever received in my life, but I was happy because I passed. I'm going to try the best I can, obviously, but at the end of the day, grades are just one measure.

Vet school is tough. So is life. If I compared myself to the girl who was an animal science major, worked as a tech for 10 years, and took anatomy and physio/histo at this school for undergrad with the exact same teachers and already learned all the material, I'd be grumpy pants all the time.
 
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WhtsThFrequency

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That's so true about the grade obsession leading to burnout. I'll try to work on the way I think about grades. It's a bit hard when I've been conditioned all my life to think that they're essentially my gateway to higher education, jobs, etc., but I'll manage!

Oh I see, that's a really good way to think about it! I wish I was encouraged the same way your dad encouraged you. That definitely would've eased the pressure on me in my high school years. xD

I swear it's like you read me like a book. o_O I'll try my best to hold onto my passions then! That's definitely useful to know since I've actually let my creative side go dormant for years to prioritize school, so thanks for that, haha!

That's really interesting! Personally, I had similar aspirations to be a marine biologist and get a PhD down the line, but I realized later that working in a lab all day wasn't really for me and that I wanted to impact animal lives directly, so I switched focuses back to my childhood dream career.

Thank you so much for the tips and wisdom! I greatly appreciate your help!:happy:

Heh, ironically it wasn't until later that he kind of "lightened up" some. I was pushed VERY hard as a kid. Likely too hard. It took a lot of time for me to unwind from that and I still struggle a lot with anxiety and perfectionism - I've just thankfully gained the ability to recognize these feelings from the "outside" and remind myself that they aren't real.
 
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Peritwinkle

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They are your gateway, but just make an active effort to realize once you get accepted, that shouldn't be the case anymore. I had to be PERFECT in undergrad, hell, I'm a perfectionist by nature. But to be honest, it was very easy for me to switch mentalities. I'm around 130-ish smart people every day, but we're all in the program and have what it takes to become doctors. My first exam was the lowest score I've ever received in my life, but I was happy because I passed. I'm going to try the best I can, obviously, but at the end of the day, grades are just one measure.

Vet school is tough. So is life. If I compared myself to the girl who was an animal science major, worked as a tech for 10 years, and took anatomy and physio/histo at this school for undergrad with the exact same teachers and already learned all the material, I'd be grumpy pants all the time.

I see. I used to be perfectionist too to some degree, and maybe have been more so these days as an undergrad, but since I'm starting to take harder classes, I'm trying to work on going easier on myself. xD Before reading this forum, I thought all A's (and maybe a few B's) were an absolute must in order to get into vet school, so getting good grades was a lot more taxing in the earlier semesters than it is now. Actually, I got a 39 on my first o-chem test (average was 35) :hilarious:, and I was honestly fine with the score since it was a tiny bit above average, so I think I'm on the path to reconstructing my brain to become less affected by bad grades. Although I'm still going to work hard to achieve a salvageable grade. But I know it's not the end of the world if I don't. :happy:
 

Peritwinkle

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Heh, ironically it wasn't until later that he kind of "lightened up" some. I was pushed VERY hard as a kid. Likely too hard. It took a lot of time for me to unwind from that and I still struggle a lot with anxiety and perfectionism - I've just thankfully gained the ability to recognize these feelings from the "outside" and remind myself that they aren't real.

Huh, that's interesting. I'm sorry to hear that you had that kind of childhood. Mine was similar, but not to your extent I think. It's weird how long things your parents say/how they treat you last. But I'm glad that he at least realized that he was pushing you too hard and that you could separate yourself from the high expectations.
 
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