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YuniCresta

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Hi! New to this website.

So I am an MS1 trying to prepare a good CV early on (I am interested in orthopedics). I am currently working with a pediatric orthopedic surgeon on a research project. The final work (abstract and, when published, the article) have me as a co-author. The project will be presented at London as an oral presentation (at an orthopedic symposium) by the Doctor, but I will not be going. Later this year we will also be presenting it at Philadelphia at the Scoliosis Research Society (this time I will be going to present it there as a poster).

I wanted to know if I could add the fact that the paper will be presented at London to my CV (obviously, making clear that I helped write the abstract and made the presentation and that I did not present it in person) even though I did not go.

And if I could, how would I write that in mi CV.
Thanks in advance!
 

NickNaylor

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Yes, you can absolutely include that on your CV. While there are generally some standards with respect to how to format a CV and the kinds of information that should be included, you can still relatively personalize how that information is presented. On my CV, I have included papers/projects that are in the works but aren't complete. I briefly described what I was doing and my goals/intentions for dissemination. You could do the same thing here: briefly describe the work and state that the project has been accepted for presentation at whatever conferences. Perhaps include the month/year that you will be presenting.

Really, though, this is somewhat pointless unless you're planning on sending your CV to people before actually doing the presentations. If you're not doing that, then just update your CV accordingly and include that you presented at these conferences. It is infinitely easier to update your CV PRN than it is to wait until you "need" a CV and have to try and remember everything that you did.
 
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YuniCresta

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Yes, you can absolutely include that on your CV. While there are generally some standards with respect to how to format a CV and the kinds of information that should be included, you can still relatively personalize how that information is presented. On my CV, I have included papers/projects that are in the works but aren't complete. I briefly described what I was doing and my goals/intentions for dissemination. You could do the same thing here: briefly describe the work and state that the project has been accepted for presentation at whatever conferences. Perhaps include the month/year that you will be presenting.

Really, though, this is somewhat pointless unless you're planning on sending your CV to people before actually doing the presentations. If you're not doing that, then just update your CV accordingly and include that you presented at these conferences. It is infinitely easier to update your CV PRN than it is to wait until you "need" a CV and have to try and remember everything that you did.

Thanks! How about the presentation that will be done ONLY by the doctor (I have and internship on that date, so I will not be able to go). Should I put the fact that it will be presented at that symposium, although not by me, or should I just ignore it and add only the ones I attend?
 

NickNaylor

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Thanks! How about the presentation that will be done ONLY by the doctor (I have and internship on that date, so I will not be able to go). Should I put the fact that it will be presented at that symposium, although not by me, or should I just ignore it and add only the ones I attend?
If you contributed to the work that is presented I think it's worth listing. Are you listed as an author for it in some way?
 

HybridEarth

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Yeah, any project with your name somewhere on the author list should go on your CV. You don't really need to go as far as writing up what your roles in the project are, unless you are really trying to pad your CV with extra lines. There are several opinions on how to approach this depending on who you ask.
 

JJRousseau

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Don't list the presentation. Do list the poster and list the project in a research experience section. You did not present the work, it's disingenuous to include the invited talk explicitly on your cv.


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JJRousseau

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In the future, when you PI gives a talk focused or tangential to the work, submit a poster as well with their permission. It's common for speakers to end their talk listing posters related to the orally presented work for delegates to go visit during the poster session.


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JJRousseau

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The only time where you should consider listing a conference you didn't attend is if you are a co-author (like co- first author; I.e. some language and figures on there are yours) of a poster and the other co-author presents the work. I'd probably only list it if the work won an award though, but this is a grey area.


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CubsFan314

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Although you should list yourself as a co-author on the poster in the "poster presentation" part of your CV, you should try to position yourself to be able to do as much as you can to work on the paper itself for publication. If you can get a first author manuscript (or even second author), then that is where the real gold is here.
 

Lawpy

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Don't list the presentation. Do list the poster and list the project in a research experience section. You did not present the work, it's disingenuous to include the invited talk explicitly on your cv.


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Pretty sure coauthor abstracts can be listed under the Abstracts section. First-author abstracts can be listed under Presentations section (assuming first author is the presenter which is usually the case).

Presentations section should be listed above Abstracts section since presenting stuff requires additional work and is more highly valued. Doesn't mean coauthor abstracts should be neglected. The contribution was significant enough to be listed as an author even if someone else was presenting it.
 
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Pretty sure coauthor abstracts can be listed under the Abstracts section. First-author abstracts can be listed under Presentations section (assuming first author is the presenter which is usually the case).

Presentations section should be listed above Abstracts section since presenting stuff requires additional work and is more highly valued. Doesn't mean coauthor abstracts should be neglected. The contribution was significant enough to be listed as an author even if someone else was presenting it.

This is accurate. When you list the poster or article, you can include in parentheses that it was presented at whatever meeting
 

JJRousseau

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Sure if the OP or his/her PI submitted an abstract with OP listed as an author (regardless of position) and then the abstract should be listed and a note that it was selected for presentation by senior author. However, the original post reads like the PI was invited to give a talk at the conference and the OP would probably be listed in the acknowledgements slide; not as an author below the title of the talk. In that case, I think my advice stands.


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mcloaf

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Pretty sure coauthor abstracts can be listed under the Abstracts section. First-author abstracts can be listed under Presentations section (assuming first author is the presenter which is usually the case).

Presentations section should be listed above Abstracts section since presenting stuff requires additional work and is more highly valued. Doesn't mean coauthor abstracts should be neglected. The contribution was significant enough to be listed as an author even if someone else was presenting it.

I'm far from an expert, but IMO this depends on whether that particular conference publishes the accepted abstracts. In my case I had a first author work which was accepted for a podium presentation that I was not able to give due to other commitments, however the conference publishes all abstracts presented in their companion journal and I have cited that abstract/journal on my CV. For presentations that I actually gave I list the presentation and conference and specify that it was a podium presentation. If OP's Ortho conference publishes the abstract then they should cite that, but listing it as a podium presentation on their CV seems inappropriate since it implies OP prepared and gave the actual presentation. AFAIK posters can always be listed even if you weren't the one standing next to it.
 

xClashx

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While on the topic, would you include internal conferences? Our school had 1 conference for med students, and another for med students + residents, physicians and anyone in the health care field within the network of the school.

Did an oral presentation at one and poster on the other. Or should I just put my publications and leave that out.
 

Lawpy

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I'm far from an expert, but IMO this depends on whether that particular conference publishes the accepted abstracts. In my case I had a first author work which was accepted for a podium presentation that I was not able to give due to other commitments, however the conference publishes all abstracts presented in their companion journal and I have cited that abstract/journal on my CV. For presentations that I actually gave I list the presentation and conference and specify that it was a podium presentation. If OP's Ortho conference publishes the abstract then they should cite that, but listing it as a podium presentation on their CV seems inappropriate since it implies OP prepared and gave the actual presentation. AFAIK posters can always be listed even if you weren't the one standing next to it.

Yeah I'm assuming abstracts are published and can be found online by searching for the title/DOI number. I'm just separating the Abstracts and Presentations categories to highlight what presentations OP prepared and delivered, while also listing what projects OP contributed enough to be listed as coauthors but did not present personally.
 
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YuniCresta

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I'm far from an expert, but IMO this depends on whether that particular conference publishes the accepted abstracts. In my case I had a first author work which was accepted for a podium presentation that I was not able to give due to other commitments, however the conference publishes all abstracts presented in their companion journal and I have cited that abstract/journal on my CV. For presentations that I actually gave I list the presentation and conference and specify that it was a podium presentation. If OP's Ortho conference publishes the abstract then they should cite that, but listing it as a podium presentation on their CV seems inappropriate since it implies OP prepared and gave the actual presentation. AFAIK posters can always be listed even if you weren't the one standing next to it.
This was really helpful. The conference does publish the abstract in a companion journal and I am listed as coauthor there. Thank you so much!
 
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JJRousseau

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This was really helpful. The conference does publish the abstract in a companion journal and I am listed as coauthor there. Thank you so much!

In that case, ignore my advice and listen to them - list it as an abstract.
 

YuniCresta

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In that case, ignore my advice and listen to them - list it as an abstract.
Will do, thanks for your advice though. Makes a lot of sense to ignore the presentation if I did not attend to it.
 
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