Sep 3, 2017
1
0
What does Brexit mean for Non EEA IMGs?

Prior to Brexit, the majority of jobs and training posts had to be given to EEA applicants by law if there were no suitable UK applicants, leaving only a small number available for IMGs.

From what I've heard, IMGs had to have an excellent resume with lots of research or be in a Masters program on a student visa to have a chance of getting a training post, and even then they were very lucky.

I've also heard that Caribbean IMGs are highly valued in the UK, as they've had good training and work quite hard as well as being native English speakers.

Now that Brexit has come to pass, does that mean IMGs will be competing with the EEA applicants and have an equal chance as them to get training posts in the UK now? Hence will it be easier for IMGs to get training posts post-Brexit?
 

Medstart108

7+ Year Member
Mar 24, 2012
2,147
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Status
Resident [Any Field]
What does Brexit mean for Non EEA IMGs?

Prior to Brexit, the majority of jobs and training posts had to be given to EEA applicants by law if there were no suitable UK applicants, leaving only a small number available for IMGs.

From what I've heard, IMGs had to have an excellent resume with lots of research or be in a Masters program on a student visa to have a chance of getting a training post, and even then they were very lucky.

I've also heard that Caribbean IMGs are highly valued in the UK, as they've had good training and work quite hard as well as being native English speakers.

Now that Brexit has come to pass, does that mean IMGs will be competing with the EEA applicants and have an equal chance as them to get training posts in the UK now? Hence will it be easier for IMGs to get training posts post-Brexit?
It depends on how the Brexit negotiations go. It is a possibility for sure.
 

OxToCA

2+ Year Member
Nov 8, 2015
111
38
Status
Pre-Medical
From what I've heard, IMGs had to have an excellent resume with lots of research or be in a Masters program on a student visa to have a chance of getting a training post, and even then they were very lucky... Hence will it be easier for IMGs to get training posts post-Brexit?
I am in a masters program for pre and practicing physicians in the UK and have heard that being in one will increase your odds, especially after the Brexit. However, I was accepted to it/am doing it before medical school.

For reference, I originally did my masters to prepare for pharmaceutical medicine specialty training, which is a UK specialty recognized by the Royal colleges, or entering pharmaceutical development through a US residency; the UK and Ireland have a strong biotech industry. Similarly, there are a few other masters here I can recommend for certain specialties which have a track record of matching students to residencies and/or jobs. I emailed the chair of psychiatry at Yale university yesterday regarding the above as well as the Director of one of the UK masters I'd recommend whom is also a chair in their school of medicine in regard to matching US and Canadian students at Irish and UK medical schools with summer internships at pharmaceutical companies and masters after graduating to increase their chances for US and UK residencies and job offers which pay $160+k/year. I'll bump this thread with any news as well as after speaking with the director of another in the US at UC Berkeley-UCSF later this week. If you're curious, I'm the student rep for my masters at Oxford, but also wanted to attend Imperial College London for an MRes. Oxford (1) and Imperial (8) ranked pretty well this year, too Oxford and Cambridge top world university rankings - BBC News
 
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PhoenixFire

7+ Year Member
Apr 11, 2011
876
183
USA
Being part of EU made the UK agree to EU regulation of giving priority to EU citizens. So logically it follows that Brexit will free the UK from that agreement. However, finding an internship in the UK will be very difficult. One, they will still prioritize UK citizens. Two, according to GMC (GMC | Acceptable overseas medical qualifications):
"From 18 January 2016, EU law requires basic medical training to be both 5,500 hours AND five years. Please read the information below to understand if the changes apply to your primary medical qualification."
 
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