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Psydstudent22

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are there any inexpensive psyd programs(APA of coarse) ??
I am a junior in college with a 3.9 gpa double majoring in bio-psychology and have experience as a research assistant, a few internships and I have spearheaded a few programs at my university, like peer counseling. I will be applying next fall for schools-I need to start getting an idea of where I want to go so I can start writing my essays, planning visits, and studying for my GREs.
My hope is that after I get my psyd, I will work in a hospital setting as a clinician, and possibly opening my own practice.
Bottom line- I know there are a lot great programs out there, and I realize that no matter what it will be expensive to receive a Psyd, but I want to know if it is possible to get into a program that is somewhat affordable. I don't want to graduate with heaps of student debt.
I look forward to hearing some suggestions! Thank you for your help!! :)
 

CheetahGirl

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Rutgers PsyD is funded. All just as hard to get into as clinical psych PhD programs, and you get comparable training (i.e., you can do the same work & have the same potential with both degrees).
 
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Psydstudent22

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Hi wisneuro! Thank you for your response :) ! I realize that the Phd is by enlarge the cheapest option, however after researching the UC programs (I am in California) and a few othe Phd programs I decided that becasue I am not interested in research as a career, and my main interest is clinical practice , that a psyd program is a much better fit for me. But thank you for pointing out the financial benifits of being a Phd student, I think it is an important factor in deciding where one is going to attend school.
 

Psydstudent22

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Rutgers PsyD is funded. All just as hard to get into as clinical psych PhD programs, and you get comparable training (i.e., you can do the same work & have the same potential with both degrees).

http://psydprograms.org/top-10-psyd-programs/
Hi cheetahgirl, thank you for your response! I have been looking at Rutgers and it looks tough to get into, and I've heard that everyone and their mother applies there- I'm still going to apply though :) I just wish there were some other funded psyd programs.
 
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AcronymAllergy

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Hi wisneuro! Thank you for your response :) ! I realize that the Phd is by enlarge the cheapest option, however after researching the UC programs (I am in California) and a few othe Phd programs I decided that becasue I am not interested in research as a career, and my main interest is clinical practice , that a psyd program is a much better fit for me. But thank you for pointing out the financial benifits of being a Phd student, I think it is an important factor in deciding where one is going to attend school.

Quick point--most folks who go through clinical/counseling Ph.D. programs go on to fully or mostly-clinical careers.

Baylor may offer some/full funding (I can't recall), and I think perhaps Indiana University or thereabouts offers some funding as well. If you search these forums for something akin to, "funded Psy.D." and variants, you should be able to find previous posts on the topic.

Unfortunately, as I recall, the list is a fairly short one.
 
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CheetahGirl

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I am not interested in research as a career, and my main interest is clinical practice , that a psyd program is a much better fit for me.

This is a misnomer.

In those programs listed on that link in my above post...you will be doing just as much research as any PhD...and high quality research. Look into the distinctions between the two degrees because it will not fare well going into the application process thinking a PsyD will not train you to be a thoughtful researcher...that is how we learn and communicate what we do, through analytic reasoning (along with many other things), and then use those skills to evaluate and treat mental disorders and dysfunction.

Most folks in my Clinical Psych PhD program go on to become clinicians 100% of their time, but if any of us wanted to be professors or research scientists those doors are open to us, as they would be for any reputable PsyD program.
 
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Psydstudent22

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Quick point--most folks who go through clinical/counseling Ph.D. programs go on to fully or mostly-clinical careers.

Baylor may offer some/full funding (I can't recall), and I think perhaps Indiana University or thereabouts offers some funding as well. If you search these forums for something akin to, "funded Psy.D." and variants, you should be able to find previous posts on the topic.

Unfortunately, as I recall, the list is a fairly short one.

Thank you acronymallergy for taking the time to respond :) ! This was very helpful! I will go ahead and look for funded program on this forum- as well as clinical/counseling Phd programs. My advisors at my school have been telling me that Phd programs will only accept students interested in research- so that is good to know that many go to work in clinical settings.
Thank you again for your advice! So helpful!
 
D

deleted656923

If you decide to give Ph.D Clinical Psychology programs a try for their funding, look for programs that emphasize a "scientist-practitioner" training model rather than the more research-focused "clinical science" model. You'll still have to do some research in scientist-practioner programs, but you can usually talk with your mentor to tailor your experience to do more clinical practicums and just do the minimum amount required for research
 
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clinpsyc87

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People used to rep IUP's PsyD program here more often. Their program is almost entirely funded with a small (~7k) annual stipend. From what I can tell they expect you to be research competent but don't expect you to become a researcher like Rutgers. They have a relatively high acceptance rate but I was accepted to multiple fully funded PhDs and not even waitlisted there. Same for my friends who applied in my year. Anyway might as well throw in an app there too
 
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Ollie123

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A lot depends on the schools you are looking at. Its true UCLA or Berkeley would be very unlikely to accept someone focused on a purely clinical career. They probably aren't the best options for someone in your situation. However, plenty of other schools are happy to do so. If you are unwilling to move for graduate school, your options will be limited and you may be stuck with the relatively poor quality and extremely expensive education. If you have some geographic flexibility, there are lots of options.
 

Psydstudent22

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If you decide to give Ph.D Clinical Psychology programs a try for their funding, look for programs that emphasize a "scientist-practitioner" training model rather than the more research-focused "clinical science" model. You'll still have to do some research in scientist-practioner programs, but you can usually talk with your mentor to tailor your experience to do more clinical practicums and just do the minimum amount required for research
Thank you joepianist for your helpful advice!! I will definitely look into that. It's not that I don't enjoy research or think it's valuable to the field- in fact I enjoy it! I have been a research assistant for the head of the my universities undergrad psychology department and have really enjoyed it and I've learned a lot- however clinical practice is my main goal for after grad school. I really appreciate your thoughtful advice!
Happy thanksgiving!
 
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Psydstudent22

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A lot depends on the schools you are looking at. Its true UCLA or Berkeley would be very unlikely to accept someone focused on a purely clinical career. They probably aren't the best options for someone in your situation. However, plenty of other schools are happy to do so. If you are unwilling to move for graduate school, your options will be limited and you may be stuck with the relatively poor quality and extremely expensive education. If you have some geographic flexibility, there are lots of options.
Hi ollie123 :) thanks for the response! I am definitely open to moving for grad school and I'll be applying to multiple places throughout the country! Any suggestions?
 
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Psydstudent22

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People used to rep IUP's PsyD program here more often. Their program is almost entirely funded with a small (~7k) annual stipend. From what I can tell they expect you to be research competent but don't expect you to become a researcher like Rutgers. They have a relatively high acceptance rate but I was accepted to multiple fully funded PhDs and not even waitlisted there. Same for my friends who applied in my year. Anyway might as well throw in an app there too
Hey clinpsyc87 :) congrats on all of your acceptances! It sounds like you were an excellent student!
I will look into IUP - just started reading about them
If you don't mind sharing, what were some of the Phd programs you applied to- if for clinical psychology?
Also, if you attended a Phd program, did you find that you were well prepared for a clinical setting?
 

WisNeuro

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As others have said, PhD programs are not "research only" many are balanced and even more clinically focused. Especially considering the vast majority of those students will go on to primarily clinical careers. Those advisors are doing you a great disservice in advising you to limit your options so much. There are a ton of threads on here if you search about balanced programs and how to find them. Also remember that PhD students, on average, have more clinical experience than PsyD students when applying for internship.
 

Psydstudent22

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This is a misnomer.

In those programs listed on that link in my above post...you will be doing just as much research as any PhD...and high quality research. Look into the distinctions between the two degrees because it will not fare well going into the application process thinking a PsyD will not train you to be a thoughtful researcher...that is how we learn and communicate what we do, through analytic reasoning (along with many other things), and then use those skills to evaluate and treat mental disorders and dysfunction.

Most folks in my Clinical Psych PhD program go on to become clinicians 100% of their time, but if any of us wanted to be professors or research scientists those doors are open to us, as they would be for any reputable PsyD program.

Hi cheetahgirl- thanks again for the response :) I agree that research is very important- in fact I enjoy it! I am a research assistant to the head of the undergrad psych department at my school and I have learned so much from conducting research. All I was saying was that my main interest is being a clinician.
Thank you for your thoughtful input and advice, it is very helpful!!
 
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SublimeNature

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As a person from a Psy.D. program who never once considered a Ph.D. except for a split second and then realized it wasn't right for me- I say go for the degree your heart desires. Yes, it's nice to not have high loans after getting out, but it's 5+ years of your life so make sure you're happy with the program first and foremost. Also, there are lots of opportunities to do research in the Psy.D. programs as well. In IL, there is a school that just received APA accreditation called Midwestern University. I understand they are about half the cost of most other schools in Chicago. I'm not sure if that will change with their new accreditation or not, but it might be worth looking into. Good luck!
 

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what is this website?

#5 Northwestern University
This is one of the few Psy.D. programs in the US that is based in a department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. This program is fully supported by the Feinberg School of Medicine and also the Graduate School at Northwestern University. The fully accredited program will give you a total balance of research and clinical training. The full name of the degree is Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology.
I have never heard of a PsyD at Northwestern Feinberg.
In a Ph.D. program, students will spend a great deal of time doing research and a great deal less on clinical practice.

Generally, if you wish to focus mostly on research or teaching, consider a Ph.D. in psychology. The research training you receive will make your career options more flexible. But if you want to primarily practice psychology, the Psy.D. degree may be a better fit.
poop

Usually a Psy.D. degree will take less time to complete than a Ph.D. A Psy.D degree will mandate a certain amount of practice and coursework, and also a dissertation. This will require you to apply research to a certain psychological issue or to perform analysis of research literature on that subject. This degree can usually be finished in about three years.

The Ph.D. will require a certain amount of years of classes and practice. However, the dissertation is usually more involved. You will need to devise and defend a full research study that makes a new contribution to literature in the field. This means getting your Ph.D. can take an additional 1-2 years.
more poop
 

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In IL, there is a school that just received APA accreditation called Midwestern University. I understand they are about half the cost of most other schools in Chicago. I'm not sure if that will change with their new accreditation or not, but it might be worth looking into. Good luck!
I'd recommend doing a search for threads about midwestern. That place has a terrible reputation.
 
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CheetahGirl

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what is this website?

Beats me. Frankly, just googled "best funded PsyD programs" and don't know anything about any one of them personally (only Rutgers & St. Johns), but I am vaguely familiar with some of them (Baylor and Loyola)....mainly through SDN. Should've just used my blanket response: "Search old threads on SDN... All has been discussed ad nauseaum."

#1 Rutgers

#2 Baylor University.

#3 Loyola University

#10 St. John’s University (although, I believe this is a school psych psyd)

Probably APA would've been a better source...but thought the OP could start looking at this list for some ideas.

I know, I know, I should get back to my own work....

Edit: I removed if from my original post - wouldn't want to lead anyone else astray. I just looked a little more closely and saw that Psychology Today was one of the sources of information!! Yikes! :eek: My nemesis!
 
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CheetahGirl

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Hi cheetahgirl, thank you for your response! I have been looking at Rutgers and it looks tough to get into, and I've heard that everyone and their mother applies there- I'm still going to apply though :) I just wish there were some other funded psyd programs.

Last post...semi-promise.

Psydstudent22, of course! Any funded reputable program will be tough to get into...They are paying for you to go to school! (That's why everyone takes a shot at it...there is a lot a stake & it's mostly all good if you get in!) They want you to be the brightest and best of the best, in hopes of you: 1) finishing in 5-7 yrs max...5 is best, 2) going out in the field as a stellar clinician (or professor/researcher - whatever your heart desires), and 3) making a name for yourself & their university (hence, more folks want to go to that program and future funding becomes easier for them). Same reasoning as scholarships to undergrad...or anywhere really. Otherwise, it would not benefit them to invest in your training....and you can go to a for-profit PsyD program that charges an arm, leg, & your first-born...and pulls you in deep debt - or not.
 
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SublimeNature

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I'd recommend doing a search for threads about midwestern. That place has a terrible reputation.

I admit I know nothing about their program so this could be the case. I had practicum with someone who went there and she was an excellent clinician in training. Might not always be the case, however.
 

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Just to clear some things up, I interviewed at both Rutgers and IUP a few years ago (but did not end up going to either. Rutgers is NOT funded or at least wasn't when I interviewed there 4.5 years ago. Students get $10k their first year but otherwise no funding, though it is a state school so those tuition bills are a lot smaller than at a profession school.

IUP (again, this was several years ago and might have changed) was HALF funded. They pay half your tuition and you get a stipend for about half of what the usual stipend would be, and in return you do a half-time assistantship of some kind. Again, it's a state school, so half of tuition wouldn't be tremendously expensive and the cost of living there is low. But there would still definitely be some debt.
 
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CheetahGirl

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So this is important to know from current students and the misunderstanding is all on me now. I have friend who finished Rutgers PsyD many moons ago (10 yrs ago to be exact). She was "fully-funded" (as I recollect, but maybe that is what I understood) and her cohort was 6...but 4 finished. So a lot may have changed. It still has a great reputation around here (NY/NJ/CT).
 
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erg923

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Yes, it's nice to not have high loans after getting out, but it's 5+ years of your life so make sure you're happy with the program first and foremost.

This is just terrible advice. I would replace the word "happy" with "offers solid training that is fitting with your training needs and career goals." I person may be "happy" at the crystal healing school of professional psychology, but that doesn't make a good idea (for the person or for the integrity of the profession in general).

5 years has nothing on 30 years of crushing debt.
 
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chelly78

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Indiana State University is another PsyD program that offers funding. It is not fully funded, but the program has historically covered 75% of tuition and you easily get in-state tuition, which makes the tuition that you do pay relatively low. You also are guaranteed a stipend for the first 2 years and there are a variety of paid practicum placement opportunities for the other two years. Class sizes are small (~7) with high APA internship match rates, especially in recent years. It does require a full dissertation unlike some PsyD programs, but this will work in your favor down the line.
 

DynamicDidactic

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Just to clear some things up, I interviewed at both Rutgers and IUP a few years ago (but did not end up going to either. Rutgers is NOT funded or at least wasn't when I interviewed there 4.5 years ago. Students get $10k their first year but otherwise no funding, though it is a state school so those tuition bills are a lot smaller than at a profession school.

IUP (again, this was several years ago and might have changed) was HALF funded. They pay half your tuition and you get a stipend for about half of what the usual stipend would be, and in return you do a half-time assistantship of some kind. Again, it's a state school, so half of tuition wouldn't be tremendously expensive and the cost of living there is low. But there would still definitely be some debt.
Thank you for making that clear.

I do not think any PsyD provides full tuition remission and a stipend on a consistent basis. It does not make financial sense to a university. The only reason PhD programs have that setup is b/c the students are used as labor for research output and teaching at a much lower cost than faculty.

When looking at PsyD programs and costs, its always about which will put you least into debt. IUP is a good option b/c the Pennsylvania State System has a low tuition for in-state residents, graduate assitantships are available, and its a very low cost of living area.
 
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DynamicDidactic

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there are a variety of paid practicum placement opportunities for the other two years.
I always found this confusing. Doesn't APPIC restrict paid practicum experience from doctoral training hours for internship?
 

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I always found this confusing. Doesn't APPIC restrict paid practicum experience from doctoral training hours for internship?
I have never heard anything about that, but I could very well be mistaken. It is still supervised training as part of your doctoral degree. From what I understand, you just can't count hours outside of your training for which you are being paid and not receiving formal supervision as part of your program (i.e. working an extra job as a master's level clinician). We had students who worked part-time as crisis counselors at a community outpatient clinic and they were not allowed to count those hours. When I was at ISU and had a paid placement the placement technically paid the school and the school provided me with a stipend. That may be one way that this was side-stepped, but I'm not sure if this is how it worked at the other paid placements.
 

OneNeuroDoctor

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There are a number of PsyD programs that accepts your MS Clinical Psychology credits and Thesis reducing credit hours and time in the program to 3 years or less.

Less expensive programs are University Based programs. I know a number of students who were accepted after completing a terminal masters and finished the PsyD in three-years.

All of the information about expense of program is in their website in program statistics areas.
 
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OneNeuroDoctor

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I have never heard anything about that, but I could very well be mistaken. It is still supervised training as part of your doctoral degree. From what I understand, you just can't count hours outside of your training for which you are being paid and not receiving formal supervision as part of your program (i.e. working an extra job as a master's level clinician). We had students who worked part-time as crisis counselors at a community outpatient clinic and they were not allowed to count those hours. When I was at ISU and had a paid placement the placement technically paid the school and the school provided me with a stipend. That may be one way that this was side-stepped, but I'm not sure if this is how it worked at the other paid placements.

This is how it worked in my PsyD program. Practicums are unpaid. I am unsure of APA requiring unpaid practicum as I have known of other programs that allowed PhD\PsyD students to count their jobs as practicum rotations and some programs faculty members who had private practices paying practicum students.
 
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AcronymAllergy

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Indiana State University is another PsyD program that offers funding. It is not fully funded, but the program has historically covered 75% of tuition and you easily get in-state tuition, which makes the tuition that you do pay relatively low. You also are guaranteed a stipend for the first 2 years and there are a variety of paid practicum placement opportunities for the other two years. Class sizes are small (~7) with high APA internship match rates, especially in recent years. It does require a full dissertation unlike some PsyD programs, but this will work in your favor down the line.

This is the Indiana program I was alluding to in my post above. N = 1, but I can say I know someone who went there, and they were quite competent.
 

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I always found this confusing. Doesn't APPIC restrict paid practicum experience from doctoral training hours for internship?

The APPIC restriction is regarding paid "employment" that does not fall under the purview of training. In other words, you can't get a side job as a psych tech that has nothing to do with your program and count those hours.

There are no restrictions on being paid for involvement in clinical training opportunities that are supervised, educational and that are monitored by the graduate program. I'd wager many/most schools offer these sorts of opportunities. Mine had quite a few.
 

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The APPIC restriction is regarding paid "employment" that does not fall under the purview of training. In other words, you can't get a side job as a psych tech that has nothing to do with your program and count those hours.

There are no restrictions on being paid for involvement in clinical training opportunities that are supervised, educational and that are monitored by the graduate program. I'd wager many/most schools offer these sorts of opportunities. Mine had quite a few.
That's how I remember it as well and I took full advantage of those paid opportunities. I sure as heck couldn't count my TA hours or side jobs that I was doing as a network consultant. :cool:
 

DissertationDismay

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are there any inexpensive psyd programs(APA of coarse) ??
I am a junior in college with a 3.9 gpa double majoring in bio-psychology and have experience as a research assistant, a few internships and I have spearheaded a few programs at my university, like peer counseling. I will be applying next fall for schools-I need to start getting an idea of where I want to go so I can start writing my essays, planning visits, and studying for my GREs.
My hope is that after I get my psyd, I will work in a hospital setting as a clinician, and possibly opening my own practice.
Bottom line- I know there are a lot great programs out there, and I realize that no matter what it will be expensive to receive a Psyd, but I want to know if it is possible to get into a program that is somewhat affordable. I don't want to graduate with heaps of student debt.
I look forward to hearing some suggestions! Thank you for your help!! :)

I would recommend checking out Rivier in NH. The EdD program is accredited, the PsyD program is going up for accreditation in the Spring (2016) It is worth looking at... you are right, programs are expensive!
 

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Rivier is $835/credit hour, and they state they are a 5 year program. You're looking at low six figure debt, at a minimum there, without looking at living expenses. Not exactly what I would label as "somewhat affordable." I'd also be worried about getting an accredited internship with a PsyD in Counseling and School Psych.
 

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I'm a psyD student in CA and am happy to talk offline. I, too, think the cost of these programs are astronomical. I also am happy to be able to pursue work I love and feel like this training has really reflected that. I was not willing to relocate for grad school so this was the path I chose, and I've been very happy. If you feel that you can get outside financial support in any way (even borrowing at a lower rate) that is one way to alleviate the debt burden. But frankly, it's huge and should be considered carefully.
That being said, I've really enjoyed this path and am happy to discuss pros and cons (cons really only being the cost). Consider also checking out the new USF (San Francisco) PsyD. I think it's going to be great and they are too early for accreditation but are working that way. Unfortunately I have no sense of the cost. Good luck!
 

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Last post...semi-promise.

Psydstudent22, of course! Any funded reputable program will be tough to get into...They are paying for you to go to school! (That's why everyone takes a shot at it...there is a lot a stake & it's mostly all good if you get in!) They want you to be the brightest and best of the best, in hopes of you: 1) finishing in 5-7 yrs max...5 is best, 2) going out in the field as a stellar clinician (or professor/researcher - whatever your heart desires), and 3) making a name for yourself & their university (hence, more folks want to go to that program and future funding becomes easier for them). Same reasoning as scholarships to undergrad...or anywhere really. Otherwise, it would not benefit them to invest in your training....and you can go to a for-profit PsyD program that charges an arm, leg, & your first-born...and pulls you in deep debt - or not.
Hi cheetah girl! sorry for the late reply! I want to thank you for all your thoughtful/helpful advice! I am really impressed with the community in this network! So awesome :)
 
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Psydstudent22

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Indiana State University is another PsyD program that offers funding. It is not fully funded, but the program has historically covered 75% of tuition and you easily get in-state tuition, which makes the tuition that you do pay relatively low. You also are guaranteed a stipend for the first 2 years and there are a variety of paid practicum placement opportunities for the other two years. Class sizes are small (~7) with high APA internship match rates, especially in recent years. It does require a full dissertation unlike some PsyD programs, but this will work in your favor down the line.
Hi chelly78, thank you for the tip! I have been looking into their program, its definitely one of the more affordable programs!
 

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I would recommend checking out Rivier in NH. The EdD program is accredited, the PsyD program is going up for accreditation in the Spring (2016) It is worth looking at... you are right, programs are expensive!
Thank you dissertationdismay! I will look into it :) yes- so expensive! very intimidating to go into a full time program, just wading deeper and deeper into student debt :/
 

Brochacho

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Georgia Southern University PsyD program. APA accredited and pretty much fully funded. You work a GA position that covers your tuition and pays approximately 13K or more a year (depending on GA position) The only thing that is not covered is university fees which are around $400 a semester. The program requires a data driven dissertation and lasts 5 years. You'll have a tough time getting PsyD advice on this site though, over the years I've found it to be very PhD biased. Best of luck to you!
 
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WisNeuro

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Georgia Southern is a fairly new program, right? Tough to say, only a few cohorts have applied for internship so far, and the numbers are not good for getting an accredited internship. 4/12 students, 33% match rate to accredited internships in the past few years. Call it a bias if you want, I call it playing the numbers.
 

AcronymAllergy

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Georgia Southern is a fairly new program, right? Tough to say, only a few cohorts have applied for internship so far, and the numbers are not good for getting an accredited internship. 4/12 students, 33% match rate to accredited internships in the past few years. Call it a bias if you want, I call it playing the numbers.

Not exactly sure when they opened, but it's only recently been accredited (2014), yep. Could explain prior low match rates, so it'll be important to watch how things go moving forward. The fact that it's fully-funded is great. I also don't imagine that Statesboro, GA has a particularly high cost of living. Here are the APA's notes on the accreditation status:

At the Fall meeting of 2014 , the APA Commission on Accreditation voted to approve initial accreditation of the Clinical Psy.D. program at Georgia Southern University, Statesboro - GA, with the next site visit scheduled 5 years from the date of the program’s last site visit. The 5 years decision is based on the CoA’s professional judgment that multiple minor deficiencies exist and/or deficiencies have been recently corrected.
 

Dr.Penguin9000

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Georgia Southern University PsyD program. APA accredited and pretty much fully funded. You work a GA position that covers your tuition and pays approximately 13K or more a year (depending on GA position) The only thing that is not covered is university fees which are around $400 a semester. The program requires a data driven dissertation and lasts 5 years. You'll have a tough time getting PsyD advice on this site though, over the years I've found it to be very PhD biased. Best of luck to you!

Do you think there might be a reason why there is a "bias?"
 

PSYDNEUROGUY

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Do you think there might be a reason why there is a "bias?"

He's not "off" on his/her observation. More to the point, most of the advice given about what direction to sway in terms of Ph.D. vs. Psy.D. is often presented as anecdotal and the perspectives tend to be personally skewed in one direction (i.e., level of current income, vs. expected income, vs. expected debt, vs. ranking of program, vs. funding of program). My favorite is when people say "why don't you just go to medical school for the amount of time and money you are about to spend," second to that is the idea somehow that, maybe those who don't have children, don't want children, have different financial responsibilities, are geographically restricted or perhaps can't or don't want to enter into a Ph.D. program due to lack in research interests, GPA, test scores, etc. are somehow making a bad decision since it doesn't align with what others have deemed as acceptable from their perspective. Know that simply "providing advice" kind of seems like you are pushing others into a direction "you" have pre-selected as the more conventional or appropriate pathway.

are there any inexpensive psyd programs(APA of coarse) ??
I am a junior in college with a 3.9 gpa double majoring in bio-psychology and have experience as a research assistant, a few internships and I have spearheaded a few programs at my university, like peer counseling. I will be applying next fall for schools-I need to start getting an idea of where I want to go so I can start writing my essays, planning visits, and studying for my GREs.
My hope is that after I get my psyd, I will work in a hospital setting as a clinician, and possibly opening my own practice.
Bottom line- I know there are a lot great programs out there, and I realize that no matter what it will be expensive to receive a Psyd, but I want to know if it is possible to get into a program that is somewhat affordable. I don't want to graduate with heaps of student debt.
I look forward to hearing some suggestions! Thank you for your help!! :)

Know that a Psy.D. program will cost you a good chunk of a change (i.e., $150-200K, sometimes even more). Know that at the end of the day, you want to focus on gaining the pertinent training and competencies to function as a psychologist (i.e., assessment, intervention and synthesis of research into practice). Know that if you have research interests, several Psy.D. programs often have faculty engaged in such research and you can supplement the extensive clinical experience often representative of a Psy.D. program. Pick a program with decent APA match rates, sometimes the licensing rates can be ambiguously interpreted because some people often opt to not become licensed or delay the licensing process for whatever reasons (family issues, moving, explored other ways to apply their psychological knowledge in environment that don't require a license, etc.).

Identify Psy.D. programs that have a long standing record of sending students to certain practicum sites, pre-doc and post-doc sites. The university I attend for example has fantastic placement sites for both their forensic and neuropsychology track students. This brings up another thing to consider; when looking at programs that have tracks, while they are used to market their program as a whole, they also have utility. If you opt for a concentration, you will take coursework (4-5+ courses roughly) in a certain track that gives you exposure to a certain area that will help you solidify what you are learning in practicum, it will help market you for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral sites as this information builds upon itself and coagulates with each other between formal courses, practicum and research you may or may not opt to engage in. Additionally, many pre-doctoral sites I've seen (e.g. several VA sites, several APPCN sites) often have in their aplplication requirements, that they either prefer or sometimes require formal coursework in neuropsychology (often accumulated in a program that has a track). Conversely, there are several pre-doctoral internship sites that will only take Ph.D. students or heavily allude to accepting Ph.D. students over Psy.D. students.

I attend a program that has several students that are naive about what being a psychologist will entail, but that is fine, this is the time to iron those things out. Don't feel like you should have an inflated sense of accomplishment or should have achieved a certain amount of things prior to applying to a Psy.D. program. Lastly, have good reason to become a psychologist. I will be the one who goes out on a limb here at say that becoming a psychologist is broadly encompassing, and not liking a certain element of the profession is not detrimental, such as not wanting to engage in research. To add onto that, having several friends and family members who are either medical students, residents or currently practicing physicians; their intent was to become a clinician, some opted for an additional research fellowship so they could publish, etc. Ultimately, they learned (via their single course of biostatistics and research methods) how to assimilate the prevailing information in their respective specialities that allow them to be up to date on interventions and assessments respectively. What I am essentially saying is, don't feel like you have to be research driven or oriented to want to become a psychologist. Personally, I do enjoy research to some extent, but I would say only about 20% of the time.

I hope this might help provide an alternative view from someone currently enrolled in a Psy.D. program. It's not Harvard, it's not Baylor, Rutgers, Indiana, but it was a good fit for me, my goals, my current situation, where I ideally see myself practicing, what engagements I will have, etc. (i.e., a holistic analysis). If you have anymore questions, feel free to message me.
 
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WisNeuro

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If "anecdotal" means citing actual APA accredited match statistics, EPPP pass statistics, actual reported incomes and licensure %s, count me as guilty. Also, it may be time to look up what the definition of anecdotal is.
 
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Istilldontknow

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I am at a reputable PsyD program, and our yearly tuition is 25k. I received a scholarship for 4k and an assistantship for 10k, bringing the total down to 11k.
 
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psych.meout

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I am at a reputable PsyD program, and our yearly tuition is 25k. I received a scholarship for 4k and an assistantship for 10k, bringing the total down to 11k.

But if you are defraying the tuition costs with your assistantship, what do you do for living expenses?
 
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