Jul 17, 2014
67
69
Friends, put thine phones away during interview day.

Texting or constantly looking at phones is a telltale sign of boredom, insecurity or some other form of I-don't-wanna-be-here-esque feeling. You know how I know? Because my phone is my favorite uncomfortable social situation crutch...during social situations, when it's considered acceptable to use my phone. Interviews aren't one of those times.

Put it away. Relax. Smile. You will make it through the day a stronger person (and more flatteringly evaluated) without it.
 

Make Or Break

5+ Year Member
Jul 18, 2014
905
987
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I heard from one of the medical students, that when he interviewed, he and the other applicants were placed in a room and made to watch a presentation about the school (everyone else had stepped out, which left only the applicants). He said the majority of the people took their phones out while the video was playing. What they all failed to notice was that there was a camera in the room facing them and he saw the light on recording. He is not 100% sure the video was being saved to watch later on, though when I interviewed at that school, I saw the cameras facing us in the top corner with the little light on. So, just so you all know, you may be watched (not just with a camera) all throughout your interview to see if you are genuinely interested in the school.
 

JPA178

5+ Year Member
Feb 28, 2013
486
496
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I've heard that if admissions staff or anybody else see you with your phone out, it doesn't look good. I have left my phone in the car at each of my interviews and wear a watch for the time. It's too tempting to have my phone on me - I don't want to take the chance that I'll absentmindedly pull it out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eatingcake
About the Ads
OP
E
Jul 17, 2014
67
69
I heard from one of the medical students, that when he interviewed, he and the other applicants were placed in a room and made to watch a presentation about the school (everyone else had stepped out, which left only the applicants). He said the majority of the people took their phones out while the video was playing. What they all failed to notice was that there was a camera in the room facing them and he saw the light on recording...
Whoa. I can't even decide how likely I think it is that we're being recorded. Or how I feel about the prospect. The thought hadn't even occurred to me. In fact, I'm trying to erase it from my brain now.
 
Jun 11, 2014
740
701
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
You can take the phone out for a little bit. Just don't do it for long. Checking the time or a map on your phone is normal and fine. But be social if you and are with other applicants.
 
OP
E
Jul 17, 2014
67
69
You can take the phone out for a little bit. Just don't do it for long. Checking the time or a map on your phone is normal and fine. But be social if you and are with other applicants.
I agree; there are a handful of legit reasons that someone might briefly look at their phone. I was more referring to people who have their phones on the table all day or are actually texting openly throughout the day.

That said, I think a common perception of young people looking at their phones is disengagement from their immediate environment. Therefore, if looking at your phone is avoidable, I'd still say avoid it, esp. based on some of the comments above.
 
  • Like
Reactions: godawg300
Aug 5, 2014
171
102
Status
Pre-Medical
so i'm just a sophomore and know nothing about interviews. but I'm wondering if there's really no situation where it'd be ok to check your phone? in the waiting room to be interviewed? what are you supposed to be doing that is so much more important than checking your email? looking at the wall?
 

Ismet

PGY-almost done!
Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
May 15, 2011
9,949
9,805
Status
Resident [Any Field]
so i'm just a sophomore and know nothing about interviews. but I'm wondering if there's really no situation where it'd be ok to check your phone? in the waiting room to be interviewed? what are you supposed to be doing that is so much more important than checking your email? looking at the wall?
Talk with other people.
 

gyngyn

Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2011
24,261
40,626
Status
Attending Physician
so i'm just a sophomore and know nothing about interviews. but I'm wondering if there's really no situation where it'd be ok to check your phone? in the waiting room to be interviewed? what are you supposed to be doing that is so much more important than checking your email? looking at the wall?
The interactions of applicants in the waiting area are available for observation.
Someone who sits alone, texting, is losing many opportunities.
 
Oct 14, 2013
1,428
1,295
so i'm just a sophomore and know nothing about interviews. but I'm wondering if there's really no situation where it'd be ok to check your phone? in the waiting room to be interviewed? what are you supposed to be doing that is so much more important than checking your email? looking at the wall?
Converse? Be friendly? This is the one day that your email does not need to be checked. Just show that you can spend more than a few hours without getting sidetracked by your gadgets.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gyngyn

Snakes

Snakes On A Cane
7+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2010
277
384
Paradise
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm wondering if there's really no situation where it'd be ok to check your phone? in the waiting room to be interviewed? what are you supposed to be doing that is so much more important than checking your email? looking at the wall?
Talking to your fellow interviewees??
 
  • Like
Reactions: gyngyn

Snakes

Snakes On A Cane
7+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2010
277
384
Paradise
Status
Pre-Medical
The thing that probably isn't very obvious when you're 22 is that some of your fellow interviewees are going to end up being your colleagues. You're just starting out so sometimes it doesn't seem like other pre-meds have much to offer in an admissions waiting room. But a lot of them will become doctors eventually and forming early relationships is never a bad thing. Some of them will become faculty somewhere someday. Some will potentially be an employer or a job source. Some will become friends. Never a bad thing to reach out for those contacts early.
 
About the Ads
Aug 5, 2014
171
102
Status
Pre-Medical
hahaha damn yall just crucified me. Never really occurred to me that youd all be sitting in the same room together. i always figured youd be on your own in the waiting room of whichever doc is interviewing you. Please don't chalk me up to an antisocial dingus, more of just an uninformed sophomore lmao
 
Oct 14, 2013
1,428
1,295
hahaha damn yall just crucified me. Never really occurred to me that youd all be sitting in the same room together. i always figured youd be on your own in the waiting room of whichever doc is interviewing you. Please don't chalk me up to an antisocial dingus, more of just an uninformed sophomore lmao
Better to learn now then to learn at your interview!

There sometimes is periods where you're separated from other interviewees, but there's a lot of mingling with other applicants :)
 

Snakes

Snakes On A Cane
7+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2010
277
384
Paradise
Status
Pre-Medical
Well, there's always the "sit and stare at the clock while we mull over the fact that we're competing for the same slots" awkward silence option lol. Not nearly as productive.
 
  • Like
Reactions: moop

gyngyn

Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2011
24,261
40,626
Status
Attending Physician
Well, there's always the "sit and stare at the clock while we mull over the fact that we're competing for the same slots" awkward silence option lol. Not nearly as productive.
By the time you are in an interview group, you are no longer competing with each other.
The potential to be accepted is there for all of you.
 

jsquared91

I dropped out of school to become a doctor.
5+ Year Member
May 16, 2013
582
749
Uijeongbu
Saw a kid at an interview today that was typing on their phone as the dean gave their talk. Not great.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gyngyn
Jun 29, 2013
262
288
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
so i'm just a sophomore and know nothing about interviews. but I'm wondering if there's really no situation where it'd be ok to check your phone? in the waiting room to be interviewed? what are you supposed to be doing that is so much more important than checking your email? looking at the wall?

To be fair when you're waiting for your actual interview many times you will be alone outside an office so it would be impossible to socialize. It doesn't look good if they walk put and see you on your phone--but that's all interviews not just med school.
 

Goro

Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
54,355
80,660
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
Outstanding advice!!!

Friends, put thine phones away during interview day.

Texting or constantly looking at phones is a telltale sign of boredom, insecurity or some other form of I-don't-wanna-be-here-esque feeling. You know how I know? Because my phone is my favorite uncomfortable social situation crutch...during social situations, when it's considered acceptable to use my phone. Interviews aren't one of those times.

Put it away. Relax. Smile. You will make it through the day a stronger person (and more flatteringly evaluated) without it.
I guarantee you that this was noted and that kid will be rejected.
Saw a kid at an interview today that was typing on their phone as the dean gave their talk. Not great.
 

infinitessimal

Call me Tess.
7+ Year Member
Jan 13, 2012
251
374
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I dunno how strict they are about this... I agree with everyone that you shouldn't take your phone out at least for common courtesy, but I've seen admissions staff, tour guides/lunch students, and even deans (yes deans) take their phones out and text while someone else is talking or a presentation is going on. It doesn't mean I'm going to do it, but it didn't seem like it was a huge deal. Maybe it depends on the school?
 

claduva94

2+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2014
2,487
2,833
Status
Medical Student
I had an interviewer pull out his phone during the interview...
 
About the Ads

Ismet

PGY-almost done!
Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
May 15, 2011
9,949
9,805
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I interviewed at a school out west and completely dropped the ball on one question. I have two research experiences, the first one was over 3 years ago. Was grilled on it, and I honestly forgot all the details and the purpose of the project, my mentor did not explain anything to me at all, I just went through the motions and mentor was not open to going over stuff/ was always short with me and rude, so I later left the lab. I knew everything asked about my most recent research which ive done for almost two years. I know this made me look soo bad and am freaking out. can i expect an outright rejection?
Was it a research focused school?
 

Snakes

Snakes On A Cane
7+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2010
277
384
Paradise
Status
Pre-Medical
I dunno how strict they are about this... I agree with everyone that you shouldn't take your phone out at least for common courtesy, but I've seen admissions staff, tour guides/lunch students, and even deans (yes deans) take their phones out and text while someone else is talking or a presentation is going on. It doesn't mean I'm going to do it, but it didn't seem like it was a huge deal. Maybe it depends on the school?
Admissions staff--not interviewing for a MS spot
Tour guides--not interviewing for a MS spot
Deans--not interviewing for a MS spot

You--interviewing for a MS spot

There's a big distinction here.
 

Omppu27

El Tiburon
7+ Year Member
Aug 12, 2011
2,115
661
Pawnee, Indiana
Status
Medical Student
Admissions staff--not interviewing for a MS spot
Tour guides--not interviewing for a MS spot
Deans--not interviewing for a MS spot

You--interviewing for a MS spot

There's a big distinction here.
Exactly. There is ONE DAY for you to actually show the school that you want to be there. Checking your phone every few minutes doesn't really paint a convincing picture. For the students, staff, and faculty it's just another day on campus.
 

Snakes

Snakes On A Cane
7+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2010
277
384
Paradise
Status
Pre-Medical
To add on to the thread topic, I think you have to go into the interview day just assuming that all of your behavior is being scrutinized to some extent.
To tell a law job interview horror story (this is before the ubiquitous cellphone age), I was having lunch with a senior partner one afternoon at a pretty swanky restaurant. I was just a summer clerk then and your summer job at the firm was basically your interview. This senior partner was talking to me about joining the tax department at the firm (it was his department, essentially). Meanwhile, two tables over, another firm attorney was having an interview lunch with a prospect. Halfway through our lunch the senior partner leaned over to me and said, "That prospect has terrible table manners. He's done." I just kind of looked at him and he said, "How can this person represent our firm with clients when he eats like that?" I took away from that discussion that you never know when you're being judged during an interview. So just assume you're always being judged.
 

redpanda

Fellow-lol
10+ Year Member
Oct 6, 2009
606
501
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Admissions staff--not interviewing for a MS spot
Tour guides--not interviewing for a MS spot
Deans--not interviewing for a MS spot

You--interviewing for a MS spot

There's a big distinction here.
About the tour guides, if they're an MS4, they're probably pinging their email for interview invites, which can require a very timely response in order to get a slot. Sorry guys.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Snakes
About the Ads

ConsultantMD

7+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2009
1,001
1,034
Status
Medical Student
I had an interviewer pull out his phone during the interview...
Same but he said there was a transplant going on seemed important!

I saw this guy yawn not one, but four times in front of the Dean of Admissions while she was giving a talk. What is going on in his head??
 
  • Like
Reactions: claduva94

claduva94

2+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2014
2,487
2,833
Status
Medical Student
Same but he said there was a transplant going on seemed important!

I saw this guy yawn not one, but four times in front of the Dean of Admissions while she was giving a talk. What is going on in his head??
See this guy was retired haha. Doubtful it was that urgent.
 

kthxbai

Really bad eggs
Nov 9, 2013
797
905
In my tea garden
Status
Medical Student
Same but he said there was a transplant going on seemed important!

I saw this guy yawn not one, but four times in front of the Dean of Admissions while she was giving a talk. What is going on in his head??
About yawning...

That's just neurotic of you to assume it'll be held against him. Adcoms are people too and not every slip up will register or be judged by apocalyptic standards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: litotes

eatkalteenbars

5+ Year Member
Mar 10, 2013
101
165
Hoth
Status
Medical Student
About yawning...

That's just neurotic of you to assume it'll be held against him. Adcoms are people too and not every slip up will register or be judged by apocalyptic standards.
Agreed. Yawning isn't exactly something you have complete control over. As long as you aren't obnoxious about it (e.g. really loud yawning, stretching out your arms, etc.) it really ought not to be a problem. Just cover your mouth, try to suppress it, and carry on. I was recovering from a cold during my interview day and had to pause a few times to cough into a tissue. I highly doubt that that would be a deciding factor.

Falling asleep, on the other hand, is not acceptable. I noticed a guy nodding off during the financial aid talk and seriously wanted to throw something at him to wake him up. (I was definitely cringing in second hand embarrassment for him...)
 

Omppu27

El Tiburon
7+ Year Member
Aug 12, 2011
2,115
661
Pawnee, Indiana
Status
Medical Student
Agreed. Yawning isn't exactly something you have complete control over. As long as you aren't obnoxious about it (e.g. really loud yawning, stretching out your arms, etc.) it really ought not to be a problem. Just cover your mouth, try to suppress it, and carry on. I was recovering from a cold during my interview day and had to pause a few times to cough into a tissue. I highly doubt that that would be a deciding factor.

Falling asleep, on the other hand, is not acceptable. I noticed a guy nodding off during the financial aid talk and seriously wanted to throw something at him to wake him up. (I was definitely cringing in second hand embarrassment for him...)
Lol... Considering the ghastly cost of OOS tuition at the place I was at, everyone was definitely paying attention during the financial aid talk.
 

ConsultantMD

7+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2009
1,001
1,034
Status
Medical Student
About yawning...

That's just neurotic of you to assume it'll be held against him. Adcoms are people too and not every slip up will register or be judged by apocalyptic standards.
Maybe I'm old fashioned but I think it's really disrespectful and rude. And plus it just happened a bunch. I mean you have some control over it. Get more sleep. It's only 8am. You think patients would rave about their doc who walked in the room and started yawning? Apocalyptic standards is an extreme assumption about what I was referring to. It just comes down to respect I think.
 

gettheleadout

MS-4
Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2010
11,814
2,783
Status
Medical Student
I saw this guy yawn not one, but four times in front of the Dean of Admissions while she was giving a talk. What is going on in his head??
Yawning isn't rude (as long as you cover your mouth; no one wants to see your tonsils), but one applicant was slumped onto the table with his chin in his hand FIVE FEET FROM THE DEAN as she gave the introductory talk.
 

meatie

5+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2014
131
174
I'm pretty sure this is one of those things that gyngyn or Goro don't need to answer to come to a consensus. I think it's a common sense thing to understand that a.) no, ADCOMs are not going to smite you for being sleepy and needing to yawn (for God's sake, it's a reflex and not something you can entirely control) b.) as long as you're not making a performance piece out of it I don't think it's an issue. Cover your mouth, maybe avert your gaze while doing so, and move on with your life.

No offense, but I figured this would be a non-issue and not something we would need to have a serious conversation about with consultations from our fabulous faculty members.
 
Last edited:

kewlboy88

5+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2014
169
108
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Yawning isn't rude (as long as you cover your mouth; no one wants to see your tonsils), but one applicant was slumped onto the table with his chin in his hand FIVE FEET FROM THE DEAN as she gave the introductory talk.
You're kidding me!

Surely, one can understand that an applicant may be jet lagged (especially if they're coming from the other coast!) and may yawn because they are genuinely tired from a long flight the day before. But slumping on the table just shows a weakness that shouldn't be present if you want to become a doctor.
 
  • Like
Reactions: crossfit4lyfe

Dral

10+ Year Member
Jan 8, 2009
1,847
1,026
Dermatomicroscope
Status
Attending Physician
Admissions staff--not interviewing for a MS spot
Tour guides--not interviewing for a MS spot
Deans--not interviewing for a MS spot

You--interviewing for a MS spot

There's a big distinction here.
Not to mention any of those people may be taking care of patients and communicating important things about their care while they take time from their schedules to interview you.

Gah, everything now is just gut reaction face value...people don't seem to consider others' situations at all in depth anymore.
 

moop

1K Member
Removed
Account on Hold
Dec 15, 2013
1,785
1,351
Phone addiction is real.

Support the NoPhone campaign, a hassle-free solution to phoneless anxiety: http://nophone.eu
 
Sep 30, 2014
239
191
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Maybe I'm old fashioned but I think it's really disrespectful and rude. And plus it just happened a bunch. I mean you have some control over it. Get more sleep. It's only 8am. You think patients would rave about their doc who walked in the room and started yawning? Apocalyptic standards is an extreme assumption about what I was referring to. It just comes down to respect I think.
Keep in mind many people are flying from across the country. I had to wake up at 2:30am my time to make a 7:30 interview on the east coast, and my flight got in late the night before. I did not yawn away at interviews, but just saying. Not everyone has this luxury,
 

ConsultantMD

7+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2009
1,001
1,034
Status
Medical Student
Keep in mind many people are flying from across the country. I had to wake up at 2:30am my time to make a 7:30 interview on the east coast, and my flight got in late the night before. I did not yawn away at interviews, but just saying. Not everyone has this luxury,
Right I understand that. He was an undergrad there so that doesn't fit this case. Maybe I just have high/old school standards. I was an interviewer for my undergrad and job and have evaluated over a hundred candidates. Yawning is natural yes but I go back to my point of the signal it sends. I had an student show up in sweatpants and flip flops to an interview. Similar idea I think.
 
About the Ads