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Is my clinical experience ethical enough to put in my secondary?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by msavvy, Aug 1, 2015.

  1. msavvy

    5+ Year Member

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    While I was volunteering in the ER, I was offered an opportunity to do chest compressions on a patient under the supervision of a doctor. I was trained in CPR at the time and did not see why not, since the doctor, a whole team of nurses, and ER techs were there.

    I am consider writing this in my secondary as a clinical experience that influenced me to study medicine, but I do not know if my action would violate any type of ethics. Should I write about it?
     
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  3. Spector1

    Spector1 Orbis non Sufficit
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    what's the hospital policy on that
     
  4. ChillDawg

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    I was allowed to do that as an EMT student...assisted breathing, actually
     
  5. Grace184

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    What was the scope of your volunteering (read: what was your volunteer position?)? Even if the doctor gave you permission, you crossed a very dangerous line, because I very highly doubt assisting in codes was part of it- certified or not. What would have happened if something went wrong? You would have been involved and been liable, because you have no malpractice coverage (I'm assuming....) and the hospital certainly wouldn't be responsible for you and probably sue you as well. Always remember the scope of the position you are in and what you can and can't do. It's best you learn that now before progressing further into your career.

    Don't mention it. It was unethical and illegal. You dodged a bullet.

    Think of a different example.
     
  6. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    How could it be illegal if the OP was certified to perform CPR unsupervised in the field and was performing this act under the supervision of a physician in a hospital? I'm pretty sure that the physician and/or hospital has malpractice insurance that covers the unlikely event of a volunteer accused of malpractice while being supervised and directed by a physician. Furthermore, CPR is physically exhausting if it is done properly and it would not be unheard of for members of a team to switch off during a long code.

    My only concern would be that you had already been certified in CPR and were volunteering in an ED. If you weren't doing that because you were considering a career in medicine, why were you there? I always thing it is silly to be half-way through a pre-med curriculum and a bunch of activities aimed at getting into med school and then claim to have been influenced half way through it all. Of course, I suppose that you could have been considering several different careers including podiatrist and dentist before having your interest in medicine cemented in the ED.
     
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  7. NickNaylor

    NickNaylor Thank You for Smoking
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    Perfectly appropriate if you're CPR-certified. Hell, even if you're not it'd still be appropriate (even if you're providing inadequate compressions) until someone else could come tap you out. I don't think it'd be a problem to mention it in your app.
     
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  8. Grace184

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    I'm referring to if OP was there as a volunteer to bring ginger ale and crackers to patients as a volunteer, or if he/she was there to restock, etc. I'm going off that based on the question of this this thread referring to it being "ethical" to have helped, which leads me to believe there were specific policies in place for volunteers which were violated.
     
  9. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    If a physician says, "You, come over here and help us out, we need some fresh arms." you're going to say, "not my job, I'm just here to stock shelves." ?? BTW, you can do far more damage in the ED with gingerale and crackers if the patient should be NPO or have other contraindications than you can in doing CPR under the direction of a licensed physician.
     
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  10. Grace184

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    I am aware of NPO and contraindications. I understand where you're coming from.
     
  11. samac

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    In prepping for shadowing I was told no matter your certification don't touch the patient. If something goes wrong your medical career is dead before it starts. Most hospitals around me have malpractice insurances that don't cover someone who isn't on the payroll.

    Talking to my rep from my by state school, they said that if an applicant writes about doing something like that then they show bad judgement, but it could honestly just be a KY thing.
     
  12. Glazedonutlove

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    I would check the hospital policy to make sure...some strictly discount any qualifications you may have, including CPR/EMT/CNA while you are volunteering (so you are to act as if you don't have these certifications).
     
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  13. msavvy

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    The question asks for a clinical experience that significantly influenced my decision to go into medicine.. I hadn't gotten involved in clinical experiences after I was interested in medicine. I was thinking of saying that it gave me insight into what I was getting into.

    I've checked everywhere and the only policy for volunteers that I could find is that we weren't allowed to " performing any service for which they are not adequately trained". I'm guessing the CPR certification that was required of all volunteers would suffice.
     
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