psydstudent2020

2+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2016
403
513
81
New York
Status
Psychology Student

I’ve always wondered if my non-terminal masters (the one you get along the way to doctorate) in clinical psych could be licensable. I was always told it wasn’t, but then others have told me it depends on the state. According to this site, it states a mental health counseling program OR a related program (which my masters obviously meets the required courses). Does this mean my masters would be licensable in Florida?
 

MAClinician

Masters level clinician
2+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2016
213
179
81
Status
Non-Student
Do you have 1000 hours PRE-Masters of field work? I find that hard to believe you could accrue that many hours in 2-3 years early in your training. Plus it looks like in FL you need to be registered/pre-approved for post degree experience but maybe I’m reading it wrong? You should also look at psych license regulations in FL. In MA, a person who has earned a doctorate in psychology but tries to get LMHC license is considered to be “circumventing “ psych license regulations and that is not ok with the psych board. Not sure if FL has anything similar.
 
OP
psydstudent2020

psydstudent2020

2+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2016
403
513
81
New York
Status
Psychology Student
Do you have 1000 hours PRE-Masters of field work? I find that hard to believe you could accrue that many hours in 2-3 years early in your training. Plus it looks like in FL you need to be registered/pre-approved for post degree experience but maybe I’m reading it wrong? You should also look at psych license regulations in FL. In MA, a person who has earned a doctorate in psychology but tries to get LMHC license is considered to be “circumventing “ psych license regulations and that is not ok with the psych board. Not sure if FL has anything similar.
I would have those hours after internship. And idk why someone with a doctorate would want the LMHC license, this is a “just in case” kind of question.
 

MamaPhD

Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
7+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2010
2,002
1,826
181
Status
Psychologist
It depends on the state. Master's level credentials seem to vary a lot between jurisdictions. I think it's usually easier to get a midlevel psychology license (eg, psychological associate working under the supervision of a doctoral level licensee) than a professional counseling license with an academic master's degree.
 
Jun 21, 2018
45
55
31
In my state, not FL, you can. Some of the clinical or counseling programs have their students take the EPPP and get licensed at the masters level in order to help them have more weight when vying to get clinical practicums. I like the idea because then you get the EPPP out of the way.
 
OP
psydstudent2020

psydstudent2020

2+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2016
403
513
81
New York
Status
Psychology Student
In my state, not FL, you can. Some of the clinical or counseling programs have their students take the EPPP and get licensed at the masters level in order to help them have more weight when vying to get clinical practicums. I like the idea because then you get the EPPP out of the way.
Oh wow. My cohort tried to do that but the program told us no.
 

WisNeuro

Board Certified Neuropsychologist
10+ Year Member
Feb 15, 2009
9,683
8,114
281
Somewhere
Status
Psychologist
In my state, not FL, you can. Some of the clinical or counseling programs have their students take the EPPP and get licensed at the masters level in order to help them have more weight when vying to get clinical practicums. I like the idea because then you get the EPPP out of the way.
Some states will not let you sit for the EPPP until you have provided documentation that you already have your doctoral degree. Mine is one. The statutes are vague regarding on if earlier examinations are acceptable, or if you'd have to take it over again. Always worth checking the statutes/boards of where you are applying as this and other requirements can vary quite a bit.
 

Justanothergrad

Counseling Psychologist
5+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2013
1,640
1,351
131
Some states will not let you sit for the EPPP until you have provided documentation that you already have your doctoral degree. Mine is one. The statutes are vague regarding on if earlier examinations are acceptable, or if you'd have to take it over again. Always worth checking the statutes/boards of where you are applying as this and other requirements can vary quite a bit.
Yup.

Texas allows masters students to take the EPPP. So does North Carolina. I don't know which others. Most require a doctorate.
 

AcronymAllergy

Neuropsychologist
Moderator
Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2010
7,232
1,529
281
Status
Psychologist
I agree with recommendations to check with individual state boards, both with respect to licensability of a non-terminal masters, and whether an EPPP taken prior to earning your doctorate can be used for psychologist licensing or if you'd need to re-take. There's just so much variability across states, and it can be tough to keep up with recent changes.
 

StellaB

7+ Year Member
Jun 3, 2011
199
272
181
Status
Psychologist
Oh wow. My cohort tried to do that but the program told us no.
Program said 'No it can't be done', or 'No you're not allowed while a student'? They're different. Most programs won't let you work under a license if you're still working toward a different licensable MH degree. It muddies the water as to which ethics code you're working under, how you're being supervised, and whether you're representing yourself accurately to clients, among other potential issues.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LadyHalcyon