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Line-by-line PS

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by DVMorBust, Jun 5, 2008.

  1. DVMorBust

    DVMorBust UW SVM Class of 2013
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    I figured we could all use some stress relief this application cycle, and as I'm sure most of you know, the PS is what's been giving me the most grief. I was over on the pre-allo forum a few days ago, and they've got a hilarious line-by-line personal statement thread. Figured we could show them how it's done, folks!

    Copy/Past the personal statement and then add another sentence to it.


    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies.
     
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  2. pressmom

    pressmom Third year!
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly.
     
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  3. VetMed555

    VetMed555 VMRCVM Class of 2012
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends.
     
  4. Hobiecat1642

    Hobiecat1642 U of M c/o 2012!!!
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy.
     
    Annamalita likes this.
  5. ratbandit

    2+ Year Member

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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend.
     
    WateryTart and LetItSnow like this.
  6. starlene45

    starlene45 UC Davis SVM c/o 2013
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture.
     
    ResoluteMike and LetItSnow like this.
  7. Barnaby

    Barnaby Colorado State PVM 2013
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.
     
  8. VAgirl

    VAgirl UC Davis SVM c/o 2012
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.
     
  9. bovine

    bovine OSU CVM Class of 2012
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occured to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "Thats it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing"
     
    Bunny Blaster likes this.
  10. DVMorBust

    DVMorBust UW SVM Class of 2013
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occured to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "Thats it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing"
     
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    #10 DVMorBust, Jun 5, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2008
  11. VAgirl

    VAgirl UC Davis SVM c/o 2012
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    I dunno about you guys, but I'm pretty sure we're developing the most kick butt PS ever. There's no way adcoms don't let this applicant in! (Pardon the double negative.) :laugh::laugh:
     
  12. Barnaby

    Barnaby Colorado State PVM 2013
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    Why do you think we're writing this, VAgirl? DVMorBust is secretly plotting to steal this masterpiece and pass it off as her own personal statement. :laugh:
     
  13. DVMorBust

    DVMorBust UW SVM Class of 2013
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    Ah, but it would be false...I have, in fact, had my hand up a cow's butt.

    Everything else though is spot on! There's a bunch of psychics on here!
     
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  14. Fairyblastt

    Fairyblastt UC Davis class of 2013
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That's it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd.
     
  15. Angie09

    Angie09 Penn c/o 2012
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.
     
  16. david594

    david594 The-OSU CVM c/o 2013
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That's it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.
     
  17. twelvetigers

    twelvetigers stabby cat
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That's it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I...
     
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  18. ShelterGirl

    ShelterGirl UC Davis SVM 2012
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting.
     
  19. rachroo

    rachroo OSU CVM c/o 2013
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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting. In my free time, I also conducted research on local chacma baboons and was accepted into their troop as their alpha female.
     
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  20. Kylana

    Kylana WCVM 2015
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    Status:
    Veterinary Student
    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting. In my free time, I also conducted research on local chacma baboons and was accepted into their troop as their alpha female.

    Even with all these animal and veterinary based accomplishments, I still manage to be a very well balanced individul doing such things as running triathlons, playing varsity rugby, giving cello and tuba lessons, tutoring both French and Spanish to highschool and undergraduate students, and organizing groups to clean up the local bog every second Friday afternoon.
     
  21. LucyLoo

    LucyLoo LucyLoo
    2+ Year Member

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    I not only founded my college's Pre-Vet club, but was the president for three years as well as liason to the teaching hospital and mentored incoming freshmen.
     
  22. twelvetigers

    twelvetigers stabby cat
    Veterinarian 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    3,921 characters so far. :)
     
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    #22 twelvetigers, Jun 5, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2008
  23. LucyLoo

    LucyLoo LucyLoo
    2+ Year Member

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    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting. In my free time, I also conducted research on local chacma baboons and was accepted into their troop as their alpha female.

    Even with all these animal and veterinary based accomplishments, I still manage to be a very well balanced individul doing such things as running triathlons, playing varsity rugby, giving cello and tuba lessons, tutoring both French and Spanish to highschool and undergraduate students, and organizing groups to clean up the local bog every second Friday afternoon.

    I not only founded my college's Pre-Vet club, but I was president for three years as well as liason to the teaching hospital and mentored incoming freshmen.
     
  24. LucyLoo

    LucyLoo LucyLoo
    2+ Year Member

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    Sorry about that guys, thought I would fix it:)
     
  25. lailanni

    lailanni c/o 2012
    Veterinarian 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Status:
    Veterinarian
    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting. In my free time, I also conducted research on local chacma baboons and was accepted into their troop as their alpha female.

    Even with all these animal and veterinary based accomplishments, I still manage to be a very well balanced individul doing such things as running triathlons, playing varsity rugby, giving cello and tuba lessons, tutoring both French and Spanish to highschool and undergraduate students, and organizing groups to clean up the local bog every second Friday afternoon.

    I not only founded my college's Pre-Vet club, but I was president for three years as well as liason to the teaching hospital and mentored incoming freshmen.

    You might wonder how all this was possible since I was born without legs or arms. Only able to turn book pages with my tounge, I was still able to read significant volumes of genetic/stem cell research. As a pre-teen I sequenced my own genome and modified my genes so that I could grow back my limbs. I then went on to earn black belts in 3 different kinds of martial arts.
     
  26. BrumleyVet

    BrumleyVet Oldie but a wanna be!
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Status:
    Veterinary Student
    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting. In my free time, I also conducted research on local chacma baboons and was accepted into their troop as their alpha female.

    Even with all these animal and veterinary based accomplishments, I still manage to be a very well balanced individul doing such things as running triathlons, playing varsity rugby, giving cello and tuba lessons, tutoring both French and Spanish to highschool and undergraduate students, and organizing groups to clean up the local bog every second Friday afternoon.

    I not only founded my college's Pre-Vet club, but I was president for three years as well as liason to the teaching hospital and mentored incoming freshmen.

    You might wonder how all this was possible since I was born without legs or arms. Only able to turn book pages with my tounge, I was still able to read significant volumes of genetic/stem cell research. As a pre-teen I sequenced my own genome and modified my genes so that I could grow back my limbs. I then went on to earn black belts in 3 different kinds of martial arts.

    But over all, my greatest influence was the summer I spent with my Mother, Teresa. My committment to helping all of the animals of the world began as an infant. She would carry me on her back as we traveled from village to village blessing all those who were sickly - man or animal. With acceptance to your program, I will continue that legacy.
     
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    stealthoscope likes this.
  27. Hobiecat1642

    Hobiecat1642 U of M c/o 2012!!!
    2+ Year Member

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    The line about no arms or legs is awesome.
     
    k80rigs likes this.
  28. rachroo

    rachroo OSU CVM c/o 2013
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    :laugh:

    This, my fellow SDN'ers is a masterpiece.

    I literally laughed out loud while reading it! :D
     
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  29. chris03333

    chris03333 Veterinarian
    7+ Year Member

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    :lol: My office is in a room with lots of very busy quiet people right now. I could not stop myself from laughing but held in the verbal (so I was shaking). They all probably think I am having a mini seizure.........................:laugh:

    Thanks guys:smuggrin:
     
  30. elefante7

    elefante7 UW Madison SVM c/o 2013!
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    This is awesome everyone!

    Whenever I get frustrated with my application (or anything else for that matter), I am going to reread this wonderful personal statement.
     
  31. Wolf Vet

    Wolf Vet MSU CVM c/o 2012
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Veterinary Student
    When I was five, I treated a wild squirrel's broken leg with creative use of grape popsicle sticks and barbie clothes; I also cured his rabies. Then when I was ten I raised a litter of bear cubs; they still live in my backyard and their names are Larry, Moe, and Curly. Of course, I realised that strictly animal experience was not enough and, at the age of 15, I started volunteering at an emergency clinic, while working full time at a mixed animal practice and doing relief work with zoo vets on weekends. As each animal was cured, I sobbed profusely with an abundance of soaring joy. I have a VERY strong interest in large animal medicine and have decided to give all further proceeds from my grandfather's book "All Creatures Great and Small" to the school that I attend. Understanding that diversity is important in veterinary medicine, at the age of 18 I legally changed my name to Jane Doe in order to better reflect my uniquely American heritage and culture. It was not long before I found myself back at Harvard completing my thesis examining the role of signaling pathways involved in embryonic development using an antelope model; I hope this research will carry over into one day finding a cure for all sick puppies.

    Despite my unusual experiences, I have a profound appreciation for the role that traditional academics play in veterinary school, a fact best demonstrated by the 4.5 GPA that my undergraduate institution awarded to me. ETS similarly wanted to award my GRE a 1000 V, 1000 A, 7 W, but I insisted they donate the extra points to underprivileged children in developing countries who may never get to experience the joys of standardized testing.

    Do not be led astray, however; my book learning in no way implies a lack of street smarts or social skills. I have managed to develop my people skills, responsibility, and dedication to safety by being the designated driver for every house party at my university for the entire school population.

    In spite of all my amazing accomplishments I felt that something major was lacking in my life. One day it occurred to me that I had never had my arm up a cow's butt. "That’s it" I exclaimed "that what I have been missing". And so, during the 2 and a half years it took me to complete my combined BS/MS program in biomedical and chemical engineering (please reference my attached abstracts and publications), I also operated and managed an 2,000 head dairy herd. While managing the herd, I developed an intense interest in bovine behavior and psychology, leading me to singlehandedly redesign the other 2/3 of the meat plants in the country not already perfected by Temple Grandin, earning me the deep regard of cows nationwide.

    One day while on break from volunteering at the "sick but still lovable puppy shelter" while doing some light reading in organic chemistry the formula for a bovine food additive occurred to me, which allowed me to turn my 2000 head dairy herd into the first ever herd of chocolate milk producing cows.

    After selling Nestle the rights to the herd, I moved on to pursue a PhD one summer; my thesis was focused on the immune response of the tse tse fly. I traveled to Botswana for my studies and had the opportunity to rebuild a village for the Peace Corps while visiting. In my free time, I also conducted research on local chacma baboons and was accepted into their troop as their alpha female.

    Even with all these animal and veterinary based accomplishments, I still manage to be a very well balanced individul doing such things as running triathlons, playing varsity rugby, giving cello and tuba lessons, tutoring both French and Spanish to highschool and undergraduate students, and organizing groups to clean up the local bog every second Friday afternoon.

    I not only founded my college's Pre-Vet club, but I was president for three years as well as liason to the teaching hospital and mentored incoming freshmen.

    You might wonder how all this was possible since I was born without legs or arms. Only able to turn book pages with my tounge, I was still able to read significant volumes of genetic/stem cell research. As a pre-teen I sequenced my own genome and modified my genes so that I could grow back my limbs. I then went on to earn black belts in 3 different kinds of martial arts.

    But over all, my greatest influence was the summer I spent with my Mother, Teresa. My committment to helping all of the animals of the world began as an infant. She would carry me on her back as we traveled from village to village blessing all those who were sickly - man or animal. With acceptance to your program, I will continue that legacy.

    Yet despite these positive experiences, I know it is my hardships that have shaped me into such an ideal applicant. After all, my father, Gandhi, disapproved of my genetically altered chocolate milk cows, and after drinking the milk he refused to eat anything at all in protest. But I gained leadership experience by raising world-wide awarness of his stance...by myself.
     
  32. twelvetigers

    twelvetigers stabby cat
    Veterinarian 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    5,016 characters with spaces. Time to start trimming! And liaison is missing a letter, so that's really 5,017. :)
     
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  33. DVMorBust

    DVMorBust UW SVM Class of 2013
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Sounds like it's time to start a new one! Who wants the first line?

    ready...GO!
     
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  34. twelvetigers

    twelvetigers stabby cat
    Veterinarian 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    From the day I was born, I have had a fervent love for dogs. My parents tell me that my first words were "Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen," but I have since expanded my vocabulary to include many other notable breeds.
     
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  35. Hobiecat1642

    Hobiecat1642 U of M c/o 2012!!!
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    From the day I was born, I have had a fervent love for dogs. My parents tell me that my first words were "Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen," but I have since expanded my vocabulary to include many other notable breeds. Other such childhood anecdotes have since been lost to me, as were my parents when their private single-engine plane mysteriously vanished during a routine flight over the Bermuda Triangle, thus lending a rather lugubrious beginning to my life.
     
  36. Hobiecat1642

    Hobiecat1642 U of M c/o 2012!!!
    2+ Year Member

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    I killed the parents right off, hope nobody minds.
     
  37. Fairyblastt

    Fairyblastt UC Davis class of 2013
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    From the day I was born, I have had a fervent love for dogs. My parents tell me that my first words were "Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen," but I have since expanded my vocabulary to include many other notable breeds. Other such childhood anecdotes have since been lost to me, as were my parents when their private single-engine plane mysteriously vanished during a routine flight over the Bermuda Triangle, thus lending a rather lugubrious beginning to my life.

    I too was in that plane, but after floating lost and alone for several days, barely keeping myself alive through a diet of seaweed and rainwater, I was rescued by a friendly pod of dolphins which raised and protected me during the five years of my childhood that it took to reach civilization once more.
     
  38. PAThbrd

    PAThbrd LA Surgery Resident
    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    *bump*

    i would contribute but my brain is fried and im sleep deprived, but i didnt want this one to die because i loved the first ps so much!

    (ill contribute at some point:))
     
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  39. Tsuky2008

    Tsuky2008 Texas A&M CVM c/o 2013!!
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    From the day I was born, I have had a fervent love for dogs. My parents tell me that my first words were "Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen," but I have since expanded my vocabulary to include many other notable breeds. Other such childhood anecdotes have since been lost to me, as were my parents when their private single-engine plane mysteriously vanished during a routine flight over the Bermuda Triangle, thus lending a rather lugubrious beginning to my life.

    I too was in that plane, but after floating lost and alone for several days, barely keeping myself alive through a diet of seaweed and rainwater, I was rescued by a friendly pod of dolphins which raised and protected me during the five years of my childhood that it took to reach civilization once more. Unfortunately, by that time I had developed river blindness from a severe case of onchocerciasis. Having spent five years with dolphins, however, I was able to use echolocation to find my way around, and I have since then been teaching this skill to blind orphan children, while at the same time developing a global plan to eradicate Onchocerca volvulus without compromising the delicate ecosystem.
     
  40. VAgirl

    VAgirl UC Davis SVM c/o 2012
    2+ Year Member

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    Tsuky2008...:bow:
     
  41. Hobiecat1642

    Hobiecat1642 U of M c/o 2012!!!
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Status:
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    From the day I was born, I have had a fervent love for dogs. My parents tell me that my first words were "Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen," but I have since expanded my vocabulary to include many other notable breeds. Other such childhood anecdotes have since been lost to me, as were my parents when their private single-engine plane mysteriously vanished during a routine flight over the Bermuda Triangle, thus lending a rather lugubrious beginning to my life.

    I too was in that plane, but after floating lost and alone for several days, barely keeping myself alive through a diet of seaweed and rainwater, I was rescued by a friendly pod of dolphins which raised and protected me during the five years of my childhood that it took to reach civilization once more. Unfortunately, by that time I had developed river blindness from a severe case of onchocerciasis. Having spent five years with dolphins, however, I was able to use echolocation to find my way around, and I have since then been teaching this skill to blind orphan children, while at the same time developing a global plan to eradicate Onchocerca volvulus without compromising the delicate ecosystem. At the age of ten, after using the earnings from my eradication strategy to create a scholarship fund for the surviving children of victims of the Bermuda Triangle, I enrolled at Harvard.
     
  42. Tsuky2008

    Tsuky2008 Texas A&M CVM c/o 2013!!
    5+ Year Member

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    Thanks VAgirl! I'm taking parasitology right now and I could not get that scenario out of my head! :laugh:
     
  43. lailanni

    lailanni c/o 2012
    Veterinarian 10+ Year Member

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    Just going to bump this very old but very amusing thread :) Any takers on starting another round?
     
  44. Glammyre

    Glammyre DV(M Ph)D Plan
    Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    New round or continuing with the dolphin girl? This thread is hilarious!
     
  45. ameropean_chelsea

    Joined:
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    Veterinary Student
    I'm thinkin new round...

    The first animal I ever saved was a fire ant whose family had fallen victim to mass genocide by a hose-wielding third grader on the playground of my progressive problem-based elementary school. Within six months I had established an animal welfare organization just for eusocial insects, which continues to receive donations from...
     
  46. Glammyre

    Glammyre DV(M Ph)D Plan
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    The first animal I ever saved was a fire ant whose family had fallen victim to mass genocide by a hose-wielding third grader on the playground of my progressive problem-based elementary school. Within six months I had established an animal welfare organization just for eusocial insects, which continues to receive donations from a Kickstarter I created last year to protest the appellation "killer bee" for the African honey bee.
     
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  47. ameropean_chelsea

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    I'd really like to see what @WildZoo can do with this
     
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  48. WildZoo

    WildZoo Illegal in all 50, Unlynchable Wolf
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 5+ Year Member

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    The first animal I ever saved was a fire ant whose family had fallen victim to mass genocide by a hose-wielding third grader on the playground of my progressive problem-based elementary school. Within six months I had established an animal welfare organization just for eusocial insects, which continues to receive donations from a Kickstarter I created last year to protest the appellation "killer bee" for the African honey bee. Currently I am in conversation with local lawmakers, in the hopes that new legislation will be put in place to protect these insect societies from the whims of homeowners; I have even gone door to door in my town, campaigning for this legislation and offering alternatives to traditional pest control.
     
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  49. Glammyre

    Glammyre DV(M Ph)D Plan
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    I read *lawn*makers.
     
  50. brightimpressio

    brightimpressio PennWe V'19!
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    The first animal I ever saved was a fire ant whose family had fallen victim to mass genocide by a hose-wielding third grader on the playground of my progressive problem-based elementary school. Within six months I had established an animal welfare organization just for eusocial insects, which continues to receive donations from a Kickstarter I created last year to protest the appellation "killer bee" for the African honey bee. Currently I am in conversation with local lawmakers, in the hopes that new legislation will be put in place to protect these insect societies from the whims of homeowners; I have even gone door to door in my town, campaigning for this legislation and offering alternatives to traditional pest control. Realizing that simply attempting to influence policy would be of little-to-no use for the current generation of abused African honey bees, I decided to give up my existence as the Heinz Ketchup heiress and moved to the nearest meadow to raise awareness for, and live among, the bees. Little did I know that I was deathly allergic to honey, which I realized one day...
     
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